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  • ableabe commented on ThomasVDD's instructable Upgrade Your CNC7 months ago
    Upgrade Your CNC

    Thomas, Interesting project. Thanks. Can you please give us an idea of the rigidity when machining aluminum? Something like machining accuracy in thousands of an inch for a given span, depth of cut, and feed rate? I don't mean a general specification, but an example of what you achieved in a particular instance. Thanks.

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  • How to Process Acorns and Make Acorn Flour

    Hi Matt, I know American Indians ate acorns, but I was under the impression that they ate only corns from White Oak. The leaves of the White Oak have rounded edges, and the meat of freshly fallen corns are not very bitter at all, though I'm sure your recipe will provide a much milder product. Years ago, I tried boiling red oak corns, but I didn't peel them, as you suggest. The result was that it was impossible to get rid of the tannin, after countless changes of boiling water. I wasn't able to even get clear water. After reading your recipe, I conclude that the shells contain a hopeless amount of tannin, and they must be peeled. Thanks much for this information.

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  • ableabe commented on TheTNR's instructable TRIPLE CNC MACHINE10 months ago
    TRIPLE CNC MACHINE

    Great project. Thanks for sharing. Can you please give us an idea about the resolution or accuracy we can expect from this? I know it depends on forces, so have you tried measuring a spring constant for deflection of the business end of the tool? Have you estimated backlash error? Thanks again.

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  • ableabe commented on Healthy Kadai's instructable Pickled Green Beans2 years ago
    Pickled Green Beans

    Looks delicious. Thanks. How much salt for the 1/2 kilo beans?

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  • ableabe commented on iccycold3000's instructable 3D Printed Lathe2 years ago
    3D Printed Lathe

    Hi, and thanks for this great instructable. It must've taken a lot of work and time, and congratulations for the successful outcome. I think it's a valuable entry into the Instructable's repertoire of stuff, and I think it helps broaden the envelope on the kinds of things that are possible to make at home. I do have a couple questions. What are the maximum work piece dimensions; e.g., the max swing diameter and max length? Do you have any idea of the rigidity? Maybe you could think of a way to get an estimate. Here's one suggestion. Take two rods of two different materials with the same diameters and the same lengths. The lengths should be short enough so that the work piece flex is much smaller than the flex in the lathe itself (say, 20 mm dia and 20cm long). One material shou...

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    Hi, and thanks for this great instructable. It must've taken a lot of work and time, and congratulations for the successful outcome. I think it's a valuable entry into the Instructable's repertoire of stuff, and I think it helps broaden the envelope on the kinds of things that are possible to make at home. I do have a couple questions. What are the maximum work piece dimensions; e.g., the max swing diameter and max length? Do you have any idea of the rigidity? Maybe you could think of a way to get an estimate. Here's one suggestion. Take two rods of two different materials with the same diameters and the same lengths. The lengths should be short enough so that the work piece flex is much smaller than the flex in the lathe itself (say, 20 mm dia and 20cm long). One material should be a plastic and the other mild steel. Machine down the diameters, first by a small amount in order to get an accurate starting point, then by a considerable amount, say 0.5 mm, then measure the resulting diameters as they (may) vary along the rods' lengths. I think the results should give a good idea how rigid the lathe is.

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  • ableabe commented on Nate01's instructable How To: STAR TRAILS2 years ago
    How To: STAR TRAILS

    I think I'm missing something here. Can't you make these photos with a single shot that has a long exposure? Does GoPro allow very long exposures (say, hours)? Wouldn't this technique replace the "blending" technique you used?

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  • ableabe commented on RCLifeOn's instructable Instant Drink Cooler Machine2 years ago
    Instant Drink Cooler Machine

    I think your explanation of the underlying Physics needs refinement. For a can sitting submerged in an ice bath, there are basically only gravitational-induced convection currents aiding heat transfer. These currents move relatively slowly, both inside the can and without. With the spinning can and liquid falling on it, there is much enhanced convection. On the un-submerged part of the can, there is a "falling film," which is very thin, and so, presents greatly-reduced resistance to heat transfer, by virtue of its thinness (you can study "falling film" heat transfer on the web). Below the ice water surface next to the outside surface of the spinning can, again, the spinning maintains a relatively thin boundary layer next to the can, which greatly increases heat t...

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    I think your explanation of the underlying Physics needs refinement. For a can sitting submerged in an ice bath, there are basically only gravitational-induced convection currents aiding heat transfer. These currents move relatively slowly, both inside the can and without. With the spinning can and liquid falling on it, there is much enhanced convection. On the un-submerged part of the can, there is a "falling film," which is very thin, and so, presents greatly-reduced resistance to heat transfer, by virtue of its thinness (you can study "falling film" heat transfer on the web). Below the ice water surface next to the outside surface of the spinning can, again, the spinning maintains a relatively thin boundary layer next to the can, which greatly increases heat transfer by virtue of its thinness. Judging from the rpm you spin at, I'd guess that this boundary layer is "Laminar." In your explanation, you say that, inside the can, warmer liquid moves from central portions to outer, colder portions. That needs more analysis, since cooler water is denser than warmer water (true for most other liquids). There thus tends to develop a stable stratification, with the inside liquid rotating as a rigid body, once past a short, initial period when there will be a thin boundary layer, as there is on the outside of the can. Thus, heat transfer from the warm liquid inside the can will start at a larger level once you flip the switch, then settle down to a minimal level, with the dominant mode of heat transfer in that case being pure conduction, without much help from any convection. Thus, the heat transfer enhancement because of the thin layers acting on the outside surfaces of the can and for a short time acting on the inside surface of the can are enough to overcompensate for any inside heat transfer that is reduced because of the rigid-body rotation of the internal liquid.

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  • ableabe commented on pfred2's instructable Cheap CNC Dos and Don'ts2 years ago
    Cheap CNC Dos and Don'ts

    Please bear with me. What exactly is a gantry? Thanks for the write-up, which contains some important details that are not easy to communicate. I think more pictures would help us get more out of your CNC wisdom.

    Construction lumber is often not fully cured before sale, and I've seen some of it warp quite a bit, even after only a year of purchase. How confident are you that wood warping won't cause problems down the road? Thanks.

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  • ableabe commented on AnnaJ24's instructable Homemade Watermelon Moonshine3 years ago
    Homemade Watermelon Moonshine

    Thanks for this interesting project. Let's say I have very sweet watermelon that has 100 g sugar per kilo of fruit. Thus ten kilos of this fruit will give one kilo of sugar. I believe a kilo of sugar, when fermented, will make about a half kilo of alcohol (neglecting mass and volume differences). Thus, my ten kilos of fruit will give me a half kilo of alcohol, and if I make my moonshine about 100 proof (50%) alcohol, I'll get about a liter (kilo) of moonshine. Going through these calculations for fruit having 50 g sugar per kilo will give me only a half liter moonshine. Does this sound right to you?Thus, your suggestion to add a kilo of sugar per ten kilos of fruit will basically double the amount of sugar if we start with the sweetest fruit and would, if fermented using plain wat...

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    Thanks for this interesting project. Let's say I have very sweet watermelon that has 100 g sugar per kilo of fruit. Thus ten kilos of this fruit will give one kilo of sugar. I believe a kilo of sugar, when fermented, will make about a half kilo of alcohol (neglecting mass and volume differences). Thus, my ten kilos of fruit will give me a half kilo of alcohol, and if I make my moonshine about 100 proof (50%) alcohol, I'll get about a liter (kilo) of moonshine. Going through these calculations for fruit having 50 g sugar per kilo will give me only a half liter moonshine. Does this sound right to you?Thus, your suggestion to add a kilo of sugar per ten kilos of fruit will basically double the amount of sugar if we start with the sweetest fruit and would, if fermented using plain water (and yeast nutrients) instead of fruit, give about a liter of moonshine, although not very good tasting moonshine. I'm just trying to get a better feel for the input and output.What do you mean by "degrees"? Thanks.My other question is that you say that if you just mash the fruit and ferment, the moonshine will end up being bittersharp and smelly (which I can verify from experience), and that there's a "right technology" for making watermelon brew. Where in your method is there a significant difference from simply fermenting the fruit? Thanks. I'm anxious to try this, as I haven't been successful with fermenting watermelon (or Maple syrup). How does the watermelon beer taste? Thanks again.

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