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7CommentsDumaguete CityJoined September 22nd, 2012
Getting there - slowly!
  • agee1 commented on MiiBooth's instructable Make your own charcoal at home (Video)2 years ago
    Make your own charcoal at home (Video)

    I'm surprised you can even cross a road. You're talking about homeopathic quantities of compounds which exist in thousands of times more concentration in every park and garden. Maybe we should all wear a hazmat suit when we have a picnic my the river but until a significant risk is scientifically identified I'm going to take my chances with charcoal made at home!

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  • agee1 commented on MiiBooth's instructable Make your own charcoal at home (Video)2 years ago
    Make your own charcoal at home (Video)

    You'll go a long way in life with truth as your master, you're one of the lucky few ;)

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  • agee1 commented on MiiBooth's instructable Make your own charcoal at home (Video)2 years ago
    Make your own charcoal at home (Video)

    A wood fire becomes hotter over time, based on how much material is burnt and released as a gas. In the initial stages, fire heats wood to 212F, releasing the water within the wood as steam. When the wood dries, it releases gases, raising the temperature to well over 1,000F.Like a wood burning pizza oven the temperature is around 800°F or 425°C perfect for making fast in 90 seconds thin and crispy pizzas.

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  • agee1 commented on MiiBooth's instructable Make your own charcoal at home (Video)2 years ago
    Make your own charcoal at home (Video)

    Charcoal can be used to BBQ food such as burgers, chicken, fist etc where wood cannot. Converting it to charcoal removes toxins and odors that could affect the safety and taste of the food. Also charcoal can be used in art, medicine and deodorizing etc.

    There is nothing dangerous about using paint tins, coated or uncoated. The wood itself often contains toxins but by converting it to charcoal all of those toxins are gassed off. This is exactly why charcoal is used for BBQ cooking rather than wood.

    Maybe where you live this is true but that's hardly a standard.In the Philippines where I live less than 1% use gas burners for BBQ and we make charcoal in exactly the same way, just on a slightly larger scale. Furthermore most families have a BBQ at least 1-2 times a week. We also cook with wood fires but not in a BBQ, only convection cooking is possible with wood fires.Evolving wood into safe charcoal takes 30-90 minutes (depending on the size of the hopper and the altitude)All volatile substances either in the wood or the hopper are gassified at around 350C to 500C and as wood burns at 593C (in the presence of oxygen) the charcoal will have no noxious chemicals.For industrial use there are flash burners which heat the biomass to just 350C for 30 minutes, this is not safe for cooking ...

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    Maybe where you live this is true but that's hardly a standard.In the Philippines where I live less than 1% use gas burners for BBQ and we make charcoal in exactly the same way, just on a slightly larger scale. Furthermore most families have a BBQ at least 1-2 times a week. We also cook with wood fires but not in a BBQ, only convection cooking is possible with wood fires.Evolving wood into safe charcoal takes 30-90 minutes (depending on the size of the hopper and the altitude)All volatile substances either in the wood or the hopper are gassified at around 350C to 500C and as wood burns at 593C (in the presence of oxygen) the charcoal will have no noxious chemicals.For industrial use there are flash burners which heat the biomass to just 350C for 30 minutes, this is not safe for cooking with and can be identified by it's brown tinge, heavy weight and crumbly formation. For cooking with charcoal it should be brittle, black and lightweight.

    Thermal decomposition of polymers occurs between 100C to 200C

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