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  • enl_public's instructable Cleaning a Starrett 196's weekly stats: 5 weeks ago
    • Cleaning a Starrett 196
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  • enl_public commented on enl_public's instructable How to Adjust an Older Micrometer5 months ago
    How to Adjust an Older Micrometer

    To adjust this mic, loosen the screw in the side by the anvil. The anvil stem is threaded, and you rotate it from the bottom to adjust the position. The adjustment lock screw only need be loosened a tiny bit, as the (tapered) lower face of the screw head bears directly on the anvil stem. Snug the lock screw and recheck. It may take several iterations to get it right. If you unthread the stem lock screw all of the way out, you will see the setup. It is dead simple. Be careful. It is easy to drop the screw. Note that on many of these mic's, ham-handed users have damaged the screw slots or bent the anvil stem. Your slots look ok in the pictures, but whether the stem is straight, so that the faces are parallel, only you can tell with the unit in hand. I would guess that one reason this styl...

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    To adjust this mic, loosen the screw in the side by the anvil. The anvil stem is threaded, and you rotate it from the bottom to adjust the position. The adjustment lock screw only need be loosened a tiny bit, as the (tapered) lower face of the screw head bears directly on the anvil stem. Snug the lock screw and recheck. It may take several iterations to get it right. If you unthread the stem lock screw all of the way out, you will see the setup. It is dead simple. Be careful. It is easy to drop the screw. Note that on many of these mic's, ham-handed users have damaged the screw slots or bent the anvil stem. Your slots look ok in the pictures, but whether the stem is straight, so that the faces are parallel, only you can tell with the unit in hand. I would guess that one reason this style eventually disappeared (other than in crummy not-a-bargain models) is that the adjustment is finicky and the anvil stem has the unsupported section above the frame which can be bent easily. If it is bent, you have an ornament. Hang it on the wall. It is not practical to straighten, and regrinding the face to match the spindle costs more than a decent user.

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  • Evaluate, Repair and Adjust a Second-Hand Micrometer

    As far as I know, it is not practical. This is really a part of the heart of the tool, and is key to alignment and precision. On all examples I have knowledge of, the threaded sleeve is brazed into the body of the barrel (see photos-- yes, I ruined one so you don't have to. It was already machined for special jobs more than once, starting with cutting the frame to use it as a reach-over height mic in a lab setup, then as a stop on a lathe).Swapping parts is sometimes possible, but there have been a number of variants over the years, and there are parts that are incompatible,. even among different instances of the same model with the same features. In many cases, the graduated sleeve can be moved from one barrel to another. It can be worked off the barrel, but there is a friction spring ...

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    As far as I know, it is not practical. This is really a part of the heart of the tool, and is key to alignment and precision. On all examples I have knowledge of, the threaded sleeve is brazed into the body of the barrel (see photos-- yes, I ruined one so you don't have to. It was already machined for special jobs more than once, starting with cutting the frame to use it as a reach-over height mic in a lab setup, then as a stop on a lathe).Swapping parts is sometimes possible, but there have been a number of variants over the years, and there are parts that are incompatible,. even among different instances of the same model with the same features. In many cases, the graduated sleeve can be moved from one barrel to another. It can be worked off the barrel, but there is a friction spring under it (in every instance I have seen) that will come loose. I suggest rotating the sleeve with an adjusting wrench while providing force toward the open end. It will move.As to the problem, the most common, in my experience, is a sprung lock. You appear to have the lock removed, so the next most likely is that there is debris in the unit, either in the threads or the bushing end of the bore. Even a single strand of lint can make you day go bad. Check the threads on the spindle, as well. You will need to remove the thimble to do this. Any lint or grit will jam things up. Next is sprung fingers on the play/friction adjustment. If the adjustment nut has been tightened with the spindle out, this is a distinct possibility. This is tough to deal with, as the only remedy (short of replacing parts) is to spring the segments back out. This can be done, but it takes care to do it uniformly and without raising any burrs. ANY burr raised on the thread, inside or the adjustment threads, will ruin your day. I made up special tools for dealing with this (and a special tool with tapered threads for springing the segments back out) , but I, obviously, am not well. It can be done with a small slot-type screwdriver as a wedge in the slots, but is touchy. If there is a burr in the threads, send it in, as it will cost you much more in time and effort to deal with it.There are other possible reasons for tightness (mechanical damage such as a bent spindle, raised dings, wrong spindle in the body, for example) but I can't address these issues without seeing the unit, and Starrett is easier and less expensive than I am, and they have a full stock of spare parts.

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  • Evaluate, Repair and Adjust a Second-Hand Micrometer

    There are two primary reasons for the lock to not work: a) the roller pin is missing or stuck, and 2) the ring is plain worn out (either the ramp the roller rides or the bore that grabs the spindle). If the roller is stuck, a soak in mineral spirits or kerosene will free it. Follow up with a drop of oil applied with a pin. If the roller is missing, you can make one (not a beginner task), or just replace the assembly. If it is worn out, replacing the assembly is the only practical option. Starrett still supplied them a few years ago, even for the oldest units, but eventually they will run out of the old stock. Parts aren't cheap, so, given my proclivities, I keep a stock of part units around and grab pretty much every one I can cheaply at yard sales and flea markets. Unfortunately, the f...

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    There are two primary reasons for the lock to not work: a) the roller pin is missing or stuck, and 2) the ring is plain worn out (either the ramp the roller rides or the bore that grabs the spindle). If the roller is stuck, a soak in mineral spirits or kerosene will free it. Follow up with a drop of oil applied with a pin. If the roller is missing, you can make one (not a beginner task), or just replace the assembly. If it is worn out, replacing the assembly is the only practical option. Starrett still supplied them a few years ago, even for the oldest units, but eventually they will run out of the old stock. Parts aren't cheap, so, given my proclivities, I keep a stock of part units around and grab pretty much every one I can cheaply at yard sales and flea markets. Unfortunately, the first parts to get glommed for repairs tend to be the ratchet and the lock, as they are most often the part damaged or worn out on otherwise good units. Also note that, over the years, there have been a number of subtle changes in these, including spindle diameter and exact dimentions/form of threads, so not all parts are compatible. (I have three 436-2's with no interchangable parts-- different spindles, thimbles, and frames, including two different tapers for the thimble mount-- except the ratchet and the lock)As for adjustment, you can reseat the thimble if you don't have a wrench (or it is more than about 0.002" off), get a wrench (cheap online, often can be borrowed), or make a wrench. See my adjusting and older micrometer instructable for and example of how a wrench might be made.Have fun. Glad this helped you

    Starrett has used several mount methods. On most, it is not a user task, as it is pressed and swaged in (roating type) or is brazed (fixed type). I don't think Starret makes/has made interchangable anvil thread mic's like Mitutoyo (and the generic import suppliers).

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