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  • How to Store 3D Printing Filament

    Just to correct back to basics about polymers and moisture!The moisture content on it´s own doesn´t degrade the polymer. Most thermoplastic are hydrophobic and will find its own equilibrium in any environment. A dry winters day won´t present problems compared to a rainy summer.The problem you face is mostly due the humidity in the polymer creating vapour which is visible mostly on the surface of the melt but also creates voids inside the frozen solid.Only a very few thermoplastics degrade chemically from water content and to my knowledge ABS is not among those. Beware of PET.So what you are facing is water boiling inside the melt due to the rapid transformation from solid to melt. Drying the polymer prior to melting of course lowers this risk as the moisture level is r...

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    Just to correct back to basics about polymers and moisture!The moisture content on it´s own doesn´t degrade the polymer. Most thermoplastic are hydrophobic and will find its own equilibrium in any environment. A dry winters day won´t present problems compared to a rainy summer.The problem you face is mostly due the humidity in the polymer creating vapour which is visible mostly on the surface of the melt but also creates voids inside the frozen solid.Only a very few thermoplastics degrade chemically from water content and to my knowledge ABS is not among those. Beware of PET.So what you are facing is water boiling inside the melt due to the rapid transformation from solid to melt. Drying the polymer prior to melting of course lowers this risk as the moisture level is reduced. I kindly advice all of you printers to go to suppliers of thermoplastics websites to gather a better understanding on this issue. Just look for drying process for type of polymer, it will vary with type and gradeBut drying is the way, always! And it will take time to achieve.Try to get a dough rise in 30 seconds!Good luck, keep on printing,Regards, Ernie

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  • How to Bend PVC & Make Incredible Shapes

    I would go for trial guided by error! You are right when looking att properties, this will give you a guide but practical result is what counts. Just for bending, anything that looks ok is ok. As long as it keeps its circular shape and bends with little resistanceBut for a pressurized och chemical system I never would use bending, cold or heated, as there is a risk of damaging the properties of the tube. Then it is pipe and fittings.As pointed out here, never use an open flame! PVC can be extruded as well as molded. Just different grades with differnt additives.Good luck to You, learning by way of doing!Ernie

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  • erniewallbanger followed 3D-Printing, guitars, cnc, lasers and 7 others channel 3 years ago