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  • Inexpensive Garage Lights From LED Strips

    "Cool" white is actually (or is supposed to be) the equivalent of daylight -- a combination of sunlight and 'skylight' (the blue of the sky). Warm white is an imitation of incandescent light (light bulbs). Human vision evolved long before we had incandescent lights, so our ability to see colors accurately is greatest under daylight. Yes, we've had torches, candles, kerosene lamps and finally incandescent bulbs for some time, but our eyes are still designed (primarily) for use in daylight.Why is "cool" a higher color temperature than "warm"?Let me see if I can explain it simply...Lord Kelvin, an English scientist/physicist, came up with a way of describing the color of naturally-occurring light, based on a theoretical model:Imagine a black piece of pottery, ...

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    "Cool" white is actually (or is supposed to be) the equivalent of daylight -- a combination of sunlight and 'skylight' (the blue of the sky). Warm white is an imitation of incandescent light (light bulbs). Human vision evolved long before we had incandescent lights, so our ability to see colors accurately is greatest under daylight. Yes, we've had torches, candles, kerosene lamps and finally incandescent bulbs for some time, but our eyes are still designed (primarily) for use in daylight.Why is "cool" a higher color temperature than "warm"?Let me see if I can explain it simply...Lord Kelvin, an English scientist/physicist, came up with a way of describing the color of naturally-occurring light, based on a theoretical model:Imagine a black piece of pottery, rather round, and with a textured outer surface so that absolutely NO light is reflected from the surface. Now imagine putting a torch inside this pot and heating it up.Gradually, the pot will begin to glow a deep red, which will get brighter and more orange as we turn up the heat. At a temperature of 1800 degrees, the pot will glow orange-yellow, and be producing the same color of light that is produced by a candle.At 2800 degrees, it will be a yellow-white, about the same color as a 100-watt bulb.At 3200 degrees, it will be a whiter yellow-white -- This is the "official" warm white that is used for professional photographic lighting, including both still photo, movie film, and most television studios. If you take photos under these lights, using 'incandescent' film, the photos will look good -- The colors will appear natural.If you heat the pot even more, until it reaches a temperature of 5000 to 5800 degrees, it will be a bluish white, which matches "daylight" film, and photos taken with daylight film under daylight (real outdoor daylight or artificial 'daylight' lamps) again the colors will appear as they do in person. Taking photos with daylight film under incandescent lights will result in very orange photos, so much so that it's not possible to 'correct' the color completely. Blues and greens were not recorded accurately, and you can't "put them back" into the photo.The same goes for incandescent/indoor film shot out in the back yard -- The color will be way off, but everything will be too blue rather than orange.As I said at the beginning, this is a purely theoretical scale for describing light color, and is not designed to describe colors of light that are not produced by heat. But of course we can now produce the same colors 'heatlessly' with fluorescent lamps or LEDs. (Fluorescents can be made fairly accurate in daylight, but incandescent versions are less accurate, as not all the extra green can be filtered out by the coating on the inside of the glass tube)So if you think of a torch starting with a red flame, going to orange, then yellow, then blue, you'll understand the Kelvin Color Temperature scale.Hope this clarifies the issue for you.

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  • garbo45acp commented on Texas_Mike's instructable HUMAN HEAD PATTERN MODEL8 weeks ago
    HUMAN HEAD PATTERN MODEL

    I was surprised to see this male styro head for sale at my local Walmart (fabric department).Maybe I didn't read your instructions closely enough, but I didn't see that you measured the size of the head before beginning, on the assumption that the size of the mannequin head should be at least as large as the head of the person who will wear the cap. 100 years ago, when I was working on commercials and in live theater, I used head forms that were made of canvas and stuffed with sawdust. I had 4 of them from 'average' female head to large male head, and used them for making or dressing wigs, as well as 'helmets' or similar devices (I covered them with plastic and tape when using messy stuff like fiberglass).I've heard of people using spackle to enlarge the size of a styro head, but that w...

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    I was surprised to see this male styro head for sale at my local Walmart (fabric department).Maybe I didn't read your instructions closely enough, but I didn't see that you measured the size of the head before beginning, on the assumption that the size of the mannequin head should be at least as large as the head of the person who will wear the cap. 100 years ago, when I was working on commercials and in live theater, I used head forms that were made of canvas and stuffed with sawdust. I had 4 of them from 'average' female head to large male head, and used them for making or dressing wigs, as well as 'helmets' or similar devices (I covered them with plastic and tape when using messy stuff like fiberglass).I've heard of people using spackle to enlarge the size of a styro head, but that would make it impossible to use pins.

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  • garbo45acp commented on itskeeton's instructable Leather Hatchet/Ax Sheath2 months ago
    Leather Hatchet/Ax Sheath

    I made one very similar, but used 5 rivets across the blade end to join the front and back, and two more rivets to add a strap to the back that goes over the top and closes with a snap. I was afraid that the blade would cut the stitching during handling. I made my own stitching pony some years ago because (1) I was too cheap to buy one and (2) I had a band saw to cut the two curved pieces. Everything else is pretty much square cuts and holes for stove bolts. It's not that hard to do just by looking at photos. I did not join the two long pieces at the base, so I can add wooden blocks and get any spacing I want from 3/4" and up. The inside surfaces of those long pieces required a fair amount of sanding, but again I had power tools. I think I got the best tips on features from one of ...

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    I made one very similar, but used 5 rivets across the blade end to join the front and back, and two more rivets to add a strap to the back that goes over the top and closes with a snap. I was afraid that the blade would cut the stitching during handling. I made my own stitching pony some years ago because (1) I was too cheap to buy one and (2) I had a band saw to cut the two curved pieces. Everything else is pretty much square cuts and holes for stove bolts. It's not that hard to do just by looking at photos. I did not join the two long pieces at the base, so I can add wooden blocks and get any spacing I want from 3/4" and up. The inside surfaces of those long pieces required a fair amount of sanding, but again I had power tools. I think I got the best tips on features from one of the Stohlman (?) books that Tandy sells. The curved ends are wrapped with a layer of garment leather I salvaged from an old bomber jacket. It's just enough to grip well without leaving marks on whatever I'm sewing.No offense, but I think you intended to say "time LAPSE". If two clocks were sitting down they might have 'time laps', but when a camera is run at a low frame rate so that the speed of the action is greatly sped up when viewed, that's "time lapse.""Lapse" is from Latin, meaning slip or slide, and is also used in expressions such as "a lapse in judgement" or "my concentration lapsed". "Elapsed" -- meaning passed -- is from the same origin, so it would be proper to say "The action in the time lapse film was greatly sped up because one second elapsed between each exposure."

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  • garbo45acp commented on TwoDudesMakingStuff's instructable Make a Waterproof Fire Starter10 months ago
    Make a Waterproof Fire Starter

    I have made dozens of these for students in my (state) Dept of Natural Resources classes; each student gets 2 or 3 in a Ziplock snack bag, along with some other freebies.I have to admit that the DRYER LINT caught my eye the first time I saw it mentioned, but I found out a few things about it: It must be from drying cotton fabric, like towels.Synthetic lint does not light as easily. Dryer lint is also composed of very short (broken) fibers, so picking at the edge to get some "fuzz" to light is difficult. Cotton balls are actually a much better filler for the egg cartons than drier lint, sawdust, or anything else. I put two in each egg carton 'cup', side by side, with the coils of cotton vertical. This makes it easier to light them (read on).The COTTON BALLS work better than dr...

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    I have made dozens of these for students in my (state) Dept of Natural Resources classes; each student gets 2 or 3 in a Ziplock snack bag, along with some other freebies.I have to admit that the DRYER LINT caught my eye the first time I saw it mentioned, but I found out a few things about it: It must be from drying cotton fabric, like towels.Synthetic lint does not light as easily. Dryer lint is also composed of very short (broken) fibers, so picking at the edge to get some "fuzz" to light is difficult. Cotton balls are actually a much better filler for the egg cartons than drier lint, sawdust, or anything else. I put two in each egg carton 'cup', side by side, with the coils of cotton vertical. This makes it easier to light them (read on).The COTTON BALLS work better than drier lint because it's actually the fibers of the cotton that start the fire going, and the wax melts from the heat of the burning cotton, turning the cotton fibers into a wick. For this reason, it is essential not to completely saturate the cotton balls with wax. In warm weather, you may still be able to pry some fibers loose to get the fire started, but in cold weather the wax is like a rock, and is equally hard to light without a wax-free wick of cotton. So I pour the wax down the center of each half of the egg carton, let it soak in for a couple of minutes (that's plenty) and then add a second layer of wax. But the cotton on two sides of each 'cup' remains wax-free, so you can tease up strands of cotton to start with sparks or matches, etc. Try lighting one without these loose dry fibers and you'll seen understand why they are so important.I usually buy candles at Salvation Army or Goodwill. Broken or unattractive doesn't matter, but I avoid ones with glitter or other stuff in or on them. If I can't find candles, I'll buy canning wax at the grocery or hardware store.Crayons can be used to tint the candle wax, but is harder and a different formula than candle wax, so it doesn't burn nearly as well. Use it for color only.In the photos, I used a dark green Christmas candle, hence the color. Note that cotton on the outer edges of each "cup" is free of wax, so it will be easier to light. This is a variation I tried because I came across some cotton squares really cheap when I was shopping for cotton balls. In this case I put in two cotton balls, as previously described, and the first dose of wax, then laid one the 2x2" cotton squares on top of each "cup" before adding a second dose of wax. Keep in mind that the fire-starters I make could be lit with a spark under good conditions, or matches, etc. under less favorable conditions, as you might find when camping or - heaven forbid - lost in the woods during deer season.

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  • garbo45acp commented on jessyratfink's instructable DIY Moisturizing Hand Salve 2 years ago
    DIY Moisturizing Hand Salve

    This reminds me of Dr. Naylor's "Udder Balm" (H. W. Naylor Co, Morris, NY) and Vermont's Original "Bag Balm" (Vermont Original LLC, Lydonville, VT), both intended for use on the udders of milk cows, but similar in appearance and use to the product of this instructable. (Both are available from farm supply sources, such as Tractor Supply Co.) Naylor's is scented with Oil of Cloves, but bag balm is essentially unscented, though it has a mild 'medicinal' odor.The active ingredient in both products is 8-hydroxyquinolone (0.14 and 0.3% respectively), which is a naturally occurring antiseptic, disinfectant and pesticide. It can be extracted from the Centaurea difussa plant (diffuse knapweed, aka white knapweed or tumbling knapweed), which is native to the region from Asia ...

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    This reminds me of Dr. Naylor's "Udder Balm" (H. W. Naylor Co, Morris, NY) and Vermont's Original "Bag Balm" (Vermont Original LLC, Lydonville, VT), both intended for use on the udders of milk cows, but similar in appearance and use to the product of this instructable. (Both are available from farm supply sources, such as Tractor Supply Co.) Naylor's is scented with Oil of Cloves, but bag balm is essentially unscented, though it has a mild 'medicinal' odor.The active ingredient in both products is 8-hydroxyquinolone (0.14 and 0.3% respectively), which is a naturally occurring antiseptic, disinfectant and pesticide. It can be extracted from the Centaurea difussa plant (diffuse knapweed, aka white knapweed or tumbling knapweed), which is native to the region from Asia Minor up into Russia, but somehow made its way to North America a hundred or so years ago, and is now found in every state west of the Rockies, as well as Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Jersey.Both products are based on a blend of petrolatum (petroleum jelly) and lanolin (aka wool fat or wool grease). Lanolin is not a fat, but a grease, and it is the closest natural product to human skin oil. Therefore it is an excellent choice for preserving the moisture in the skin or restoring softness to dry skin. The downside of lanolin is that it is more likely to produce an allergic reaction than petrolatum or beeswax, and in its pure form is as thick as cold pancake syrup and quite sticky, making it difficult to use. No one is actually allergic to wool, but some are allergic to lanolin, and wool clothing has traces of lanolin in it even after the 'de-fatting' process. It's what keeps the wool waterproof, and the sheep warm by keeping water out and away from the skin.When I need a really intense treatment, just before bed I run my hands under hot water, apply a few drops of lanolin, and use the water to help spread it over my hands. I then put on cotton or synthetic gloves (glove liners) to keep it from getting all over everything I touch.So as long as you not allergic to lanolin, that could be a good ingredient to add or as a substitute for the other oils. The health claims for Vitamin E oil are mixed, and most show it has little or no effect when applied topically. You won't hear that from people who sell it, of course, but there's no scientific reason to believe it is any more beneficial from any number of other vegetable oils. Also be aware that Vitamin E applied to the skin increases the severity of sunburn.What I don't like about the beeswax is that it's still beeswax, even after you thin it with oils. You're still putting a layer of this solid material on your skin. I don't believe that using petrolatum is a sin just because it's a byproduct of the petroleum refining process, but if you do, then I suppose that's a problem. Lanolin is a 100% organic product from a renewable resource, if that's any consolation, and it's extracted from the wool after the sheep is sheared, so it only suffers the indignity of being shaved. Also keep in mind that you cannot actually 'moisturize' skin. Anything you apply is only a temporary coating, but such products can be beneficial because they help protect the skin from further damage while it repairs itself, from the inside out. In the photo, note how the Dr. Naylor product looks very similar to your beeswax product. These tins are roughly 3 x 3 x 2.5", 9 oz. and 8 oz.

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