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  • iancarbarns commented on Hackviking's instructable Raspberry Pi VPN Gateway1 year ago
    Raspberry Pi VPN Gateway

    Did you ever get this working?I've had a Pi running as per this tutorial and another running as a VPN Access Point. Then occurred to me that one Pi should be able to do both, and am nearly successful. The tip was that need to open a second VPN channel (eg, have 2x *.conf files). Then one loads as tun0 (used in iptables for eth0) and the second loads as tun1 (used in iptables for wlan0 set up as an access point as per other tutorials). Aside: For use as an access point, a finding not covered in other tutorials was a need to add @reboot (sleep 20;sudo service dnsmasq restart) & in crontab else the access point did not assign IP addresses.Presently, I have VPN sevice on LAN over the Pi's eth0, and can see WiFi with my new ssid, and can connect to it, but it's not providing internet ac...

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    Did you ever get this working?I've had a Pi running as per this tutorial and another running as a VPN Access Point. Then occurred to me that one Pi should be able to do both, and am nearly successful. The tip was that need to open a second VPN channel (eg, have 2x *.conf files). Then one loads as tun0 (used in iptables for eth0) and the second loads as tun1 (used in iptables for wlan0 set up as an access point as per other tutorials). Aside: For use as an access point, a finding not covered in other tutorials was a need to add @reboot (sleep 20;sudo service dnsmasq restart) & in crontab else the access point did not assign IP addresses.Presently, I have VPN sevice on LAN over the Pi's eth0, and can see WiFi with my new ssid, and can connect to it, but it's not providing internet access. I'm still trying fiddling with the many possible settings; hope to be successful soon and will share instructions if so.

    This probably didn't work when you wrote it, but current Raspbian releases allow you to do a completely headless setup (ie never having a keyboard, mouse or monitor connected). It's great for Pi Zero W with it's few physical connections!All you need do is:1. on your computer, open up the visible(non-linux) partition on SD card2. add an empty file called SSH (no extension, no content, just the filename)3. add a file called wpa_supplicant.confwith the following content added with Notepad++ (not a word processor - the file is very sensitive to format and CR vs CRLF). My example here will automatically connect the Pi to the first one of two networks (ie my 5GHz preferred to my 2.4GHz) - you can omit one of the blocks [and the priority=x lines] if you only have 1 network.In the b...

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    This probably didn't work when you wrote it, but current Raspbian releases allow you to do a completely headless setup (ie never having a keyboard, mouse or monitor connected). It's great for Pi Zero W with it's few physical connections!All you need do is:1. on your computer, open up the visible(non-linux) partition on SD card2. add an empty file called SSH (no extension, no content, just the filename)3. add a file called wpa_supplicant.confwith the following content added with Notepad++ (not a word processor - the file is very sensitive to format and CR vs CRLF). My example here will automatically connect the Pi to the first one of two networks (ie my 5GHz preferred to my 2.4GHz) - you can omit one of the blocks [and the priority=x lines] if you only have 1 network.In the below, the formatting has unfortunately been destroyed by this forum. Each of the lines starting ssid, psk, key, id and priority need to be indented by 4 spaces. Change the Network name and passphrase to match your network (Duh!!)ctrl_interface=DIR=/var/run/wpa_supplicant GROUP=netdevupdate_config=1country=GBnetwork={ ssid="Network1name" psk="Network1passphrase" key_mgmt=WPA-PSK id_str="5Ghz" priority=9}network={ ssid="Network2name" psk="Network2passphrase" key_mgmt=WPA-PSK id_str="2.4GHz" priority=8}Then when you reboot the Pi, it will connect to your network with SSH enabled so you can immediately log in over SSH. (you'll need to find its IP address eg from your router)Note that these 2 files are deleted when the Pi processes them, so you should keep copies for re-use (they can be in the same place on the SD card with different filenames)

    That's not right (and you're the author!).For the device you want to give VPN'd access to (whether wireless or wired), you need to go into it's connection settings. Usually this will be set to automatic (so it gets it's settings from the router). Change this to 'Manual' (or change existing manual settings) so that the IP address for "Gateway" (called"Router" on some devices eg iPhone) is the IP address of Raspberry Pi, instead of that of your router.On a home network, this would often be a chnage from 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1 xxx where xxx is the Pi's IP address.You may be forced to change the DNS server address as well. Try entering the Pi's IP address there as well; if that doesn't work, use 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 (the Cloudflare DNS servers; or you can use Google's 8...

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    That's not right (and you're the author!).For the device you want to give VPN'd access to (whether wireless or wired), you need to go into it's connection settings. Usually this will be set to automatic (so it gets it's settings from the router). Change this to 'Manual' (or change existing manual settings) so that the IP address for "Gateway" (called"Router" on some devices eg iPhone) is the IP address of Raspberry Pi, instead of that of your router.On a home network, this would often be a chnage from 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1 xxx where xxx is the Pi's IP address.You may be forced to change the DNS server address as well. Try entering the Pi's IP address there as well; if that doesn't work, use 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 (the Cloudflare DNS servers; or you can use Google's 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 or any others you know and like ...)

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  • iancarbarns commented on tjaap's instructable Literary Clock Made From E-reader1 year ago
    Literary Clock Made From E-reader

    The time on your kindle should periodically synchronise with Internet Time if WiFi is turned on. It shouldn't drift out much even if WiFi is off (until the battery goes flat).In the formats you are quoting, an equivalent of TZ=CEST would be 'Europe/Zurich' so you're maybe on the wrong track. Have you tried "TZ=EST" (ie US Eastern Standard Time)?If you want to do it yourself in Linux, see https://community.intersystems.com/post/setting-tz-environment-variable-linux

    The kindle's clock runs anyway. This project just displays the clock, continuously, having turned off the 'power down the kindle if it's not being used' feature. Power is used by the eink display every time the image is changed (ie once/minute). So basically it uses the same power as reading a book at 1 page per minute.Battery life would be prolonged by turning off WiFi, but in theory that would allow the time to drift away from precise, as the Kindle synchronises with Internet Time in the background. I don't think that would be a problem in real life - should stay as accurate as any other non-synchronised digital clock (as long as the battery doesn't go flat.I have mine connected to a solar-recharging USB power bank!

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  • iancarbarns commented on tjaap's instructable Literary Clock Made From E-reader1 year ago
    Literary Clock Made From E-reader

    On my old kindle, the battery lasts a couple of days

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  • iancarbarns commented on tjaap's instructable Literary Clock Made From E-reader1 year ago
    Literary Clock Made From E-reader

    Worked similarly for me EXCEPT there was no need to either generate, remember or type in the RSA public/private key pair.And in Step 5 a, when editing \usbnet\etc\config, also edit the lines where the Kindle's IP address is stated (in my case 192.168.1.199) and the Host IP address (ie for your PC) (192.168.1.20 for me).Maybe entering the IP addresses there is an alternative to needing the authorisation keys? I'm not 100% on how this pairing works.

    For page advance not showing the quote source, the author's suggestion to me of (a) deleting the 'clockisticking' file so the clock does not start 'ON' and(b) running the script from the linux command line a single time:sh /mnt/us/timelit/showMetadata.shI'm just guessing, but I think the issue is that it doesn't like the empty 'clockisticking' file but is OK when it gets some valid content there to start with

    The author's suggestion to me of (a) deleting the 'clockisticking' file so the clock does not start 'ON' and(b) running the script from the linux command line a single time:sh /mnt/us/timelit/showMetadata.shI'm just guessing, but I think the issue is that it doesn't like the empty 'clockisticking' file but is OK when it gets some valid content there to start with

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  • iancarbarns commented on tjaap's instructable Literary Clock Made From E-reader1 year ago
    Literary Clock Made From E-reader

    See my earlier post - might help:Wasted ages trying to get SSH to work for the couple of steps that need it as the linked mobileread.com instructions for that aren't so good. The instructions at https://wiki.mobileread.com/wiki/Kindle_Touch_Hacking#USB_Networking are better, but the IP addresses need modified for Kindle 3 (set PC to 192.168.2.1 and the Kindle appears at 192.168.2.2).There are Mac as well as PC instructions there

    This fix for the time works, except you missed a space out.With the line in timelit.sh changed to remove TZ=CEST so it looks like MinuteOTheDay="$(date -R +"%H%M")"; the literary clock seems to simply pick up the Kindle's time (as set in [Menu] [Settings]). And that should be good for everyone!

    You may not have gone wrong at all. If you look in the 'images' folder, you will see that there isn't a quote for every single minute of the day. So, if you happen to start the clock and the time is one that has no image, you'll get a blank screen. Leave it a while, and as soon as there is a time which has an image, it should appear.Once the clock is running, the 'old' time remains on screen rather than a blank page appearing

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  • iancarbarns commented on tjaap's instructable Literary Clock Made From E-reader1 year ago
    Literary Clock Made From E-reader

    Great idea! But I have a couple of problems you might be able to help with! See below.I installed it on a Kindle 3 (same as yours). Wasted ages trying to get SSH to work for the couple of steps that need it as the linked mobileread.com instructions for that aren't so good. The instructions at https://wiki.mobileread.com/wiki/Kindle_Touch_Hacking#USB_Networking are better, but the IP addresses need modified for Kindle 3 (set PC to 192.168.2.1 and the Kindle appears at 192.168.2.2).My problems are:1. The time is exactly 2 hours out. It's showing GMT and I am in CEST. My Kindle's time is set correctly. I saw your instruction that I might need to change TZ=CEST in timelit.sh, but that should be correct. It also doesn't seem to make any difference if I do change it. What could be wrong?2. Pr...

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    Great idea! But I have a couple of problems you might be able to help with! See below.I installed it on a Kindle 3 (same as yours). Wasted ages trying to get SSH to work for the couple of steps that need it as the linked mobileread.com instructions for that aren't so good. The instructions at https://wiki.mobileread.com/wiki/Kindle_Touch_Hacking#USB_Networking are better, but the IP addresses need modified for Kindle 3 (set PC to 192.168.2.1 and the Kindle appears at 192.168.2.2).My problems are:1. The time is exactly 2 hours out. It's showing GMT and I am in CEST. My Kindle's time is set correctly. I saw your instruction that I might need to change TZ=CEST in timelit.sh, but that should be correct. It also doesn't seem to make any difference if I do change it. What could be wrong?2. Pressing 'page forward' doesn't show the image version with source details. All the metafile *.png's are present, it's as though it doesn't tell that I have pressed 'page forward'. I do have Launchpad installed and working (it reacts properly to Shift-C). What could be wrong?

    There are Mac instructions on getting SSH working at https://wiki.mobileread.com/wiki/Kindle_Touch_Hacking#USB_Networking, but the IP addresses need modified for Kindle 3 (set PC to 192.168.2.1 and the Kindle appears at 192.168.2.2).Otherwise should be pretty similar to install

    Great idea!I installed it on a Kindle 3 (same as yours). Wasted ages trying to get SSH to work for the couple of steps that need it as the linked mobileread.com instructions for that aren't so good. The instructions at https://wiki.mobileread.com/wiki/Kindle_Touch_Hacking#USB_Networking are better, but the IP addresses need modified for Kindle 3 (set PC to 192.168.2.1 and the Kindle appears at 192.168.2.2).

    You don't need the *.csv file at all - that was just the description of how the author made the images. All you need is the images folder (for the pages showing the quotes) and (within it) the metadata folder (with the pages showing the quotes with the source at the bottom)

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  • iancarbarns followed tjaap1 year ago
      • Literary Clock Made From E-reader
      • Faux Power Plug As a Switch
      • Cheap Web-connected Thermostat
  • Super Simple Electrocardiogram (ECG) Circuit

    Link has moved to http://www.swharden.com/wp/category/electronics/di...

    Our chat is getting too long. My comment meant "good enough for experimentation use" not medical diagnostic use. The article I was unable to find wasn't on Instructables after all. It's at https://blog.adafruit.com/2016/08/31/electrocardio... I am a physician too, not an engineer, British but now live in Switzerland. I do Patient Safety in the pharma industry. My best claim to fame is that I nearly invented Windows, but unfortunately didn't realise how revolutionary it was - things could have worked out rather differently ...

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  • Super Simple Electrocardiogram (ECG) Circuit

    I described a chest lead, not aVL.Your 'fake ground' is properly called 'Goldberger's Central Terminal'. It's all described nicely in the Wikipedia linked from the original article - ie https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography For measuring the the chest leads V1-V6 the exact ground does not really matter, and using the two wires connected to right arm and a leg will be quite OK.The main quality issue with this circuit is that the author has not implemented a low-pass filter to get rid of the 50 Hz mains hum (60 Hz if you are unlucky enough to be ruled by Mr Trump!).

    You can send the signal to the sound card on your PC, using that as an A/D converter. Then display the result using a Python script. That's all shown at http://www.swharden.com/wp/20160808diyecgwith1opamp/ . It's also presented on here as an Instructable, but I cannot find it just now. His circuit, by the way, is simpler using just a 741 Op Amp and seems to work quite well. He implements a low-pass filter in software (adjustable) to get rid of mains hum.

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  • Super Simple Electrocardiogram (ECG) Circuit

    There's an inconsistency here. If you build yourself an ECG, heart-monitoring machine, ie a kit of parts with wires to wrists and ankles, you all worry you might get electrocuted by your 5v mains PSU. But if you instead built say a radio or anything else powered by that same PSU, you would not be in the slightest concerned if you touched live wires during the construction process because its only 5v. But thats the same 5v, connected to your hands. Its either dangerous in both circuits or safe in both circuits - completely irrelevant that one happens to be measuring your heart.I suggest to you that this circuit is perfectly safe, unless your mains adaptor is faulty - then it is dangerous whatever the circuit you construct!The body has a high resistance and is immune to low voltages like ...

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    There's an inconsistency here. If you build yourself an ECG, heart-monitoring machine, ie a kit of parts with wires to wrists and ankles, you all worry you might get electrocuted by your 5v mains PSU. But if you instead built say a radio or anything else powered by that same PSU, you would not be in the slightest concerned if you touched live wires during the construction process because its only 5v. But thats the same 5v, connected to your hands. Its either dangerous in both circuits or safe in both circuits - completely irrelevant that one happens to be measuring your heart.I suggest to you that this circuit is perfectly safe, unless your mains adaptor is faulty - then it is dangerous whatever the circuit you construct!The body has a high resistance and is immune to low voltages like this. I am not in the slightest concerned to grab the terminals of a 12v car battery one in each hand.

    It's V1 to V6 actually - the electrodes placed across the left front of the chest wall.This circuit is in effect displaying Electrode 2 (left arm) (ie the heart as viewed from left shoulder - where the left arm joins the body!), using Electrode 1 as reference and Electrode 3 as a ground.So to view V1 to V6, simply move the Electrode 2 from left wrist to the desired place on chest wall and that will do the trick. Maybe not medically perfect, but close enough.

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  • iancarbarns commented on pinchan's instructable Use Your Tablet As Raspberry Pi Screen2 years ago
    Use Your Tablet As Raspberry Pi Screen

    You don't need a monitor. You should be able to look up the RPi's IP address by looking at your router's interface - in fact, better to look there anyway, because you will probably want to switch it to be a fixed local IP address which does not change day by day ...So you may as well look it up and make it fixed in the same step ...

    Rather than opening ports (which is inherently insecure) you can set up a free VPN service using Weave. See Raspberry Pi instructions at https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/remote-access/access-over-Internet/README.md

    The number after the colon in VNC-Viwer is NOT a port number, it is the monitor number on the Raspberry Pi's VNC-Server, usually it will be :1.In the picture in the Instructable, it does show :1, but the IP address shown only has 3 sections instead of 4!! (it says 192.168.16:1)Usually it will be 192.168.XXX.YYY:1 where XXX:YYY need to be substituted by your RPi's local IP address on your home network

    See https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/remote-access/vnc/ for better instructions how to achieve this, including over internet using Weave

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  • iancarbarns commented on pchretien's instructable The Fibonacci Clock3 years ago
    The Fibonacci Clock

    A great gift idea for my mathematical relatives!I made mine using Excel, entirely in software!

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