author
8Instructables277,416Views197CommentsGreece
I'm an electronic and computer engineer. Web development and electronics design is what I mostly do, but I do enjoy working on personal projects that involve electronics but also 3D printing. And if it happens to I come up with something that I think it might be useful to others I usually share it.

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100+ Comments Earned a bronze medal
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Raspberry Pi Contest
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Raspberry Pi Contest
Microcontroller Contest 2017
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Microcontroller Contest 2017
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  • Design Your Own Raspberry Pi Compute Module PCB

    Hi,Unfortunately, I don't have the time to do a tutorial where I recreate the schematic and explain step by step why I pick each component. However, if you have any specific questions I'd be happy to answer. I do believe though that most things are pretty much straightforward.For example regarding the power I'm not even using a switching regulator 5V, is provided by the power input and the 3.3V and 1.8V by the two REG1117 linear regulators. Why I picked two 10uF tantalum capacitors for each of them? Well, apart from these being basically standard values it's what's also recommended by the datasheet. As for the 100nF capacitors that you can see everywhere in the board, you should know that when dealing with digital circuits it's standard practice to place an 100nF ceramic cap as close as...

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    Hi,Unfortunately, I don't have the time to do a tutorial where I recreate the schematic and explain step by step why I pick each component. However, if you have any specific questions I'd be happy to answer. I do believe though that most things are pretty much straightforward.For example regarding the power I'm not even using a switching regulator 5V, is provided by the power input and the 3.3V and 1.8V by the two REG1117 linear regulators. Why I picked two 10uF tantalum capacitors for each of them? Well, apart from these being basically standard values it's what's also recommended by the datasheet. As for the 100nF capacitors that you can see everywhere in the board, you should know that when dealing with digital circuits it's standard practice to place an 100nF ceramic cap as close as possible to each pair of power pins.

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  • Design Your Own Raspberry Pi Compute Module PCB

    I used a piece of software called Saturn PCB Design Toolkit. You can download it for free though it's only available for windows, but it does run just fine under Wine. In order to use the right numbers I had a look at the Standard PCB Manufacturing Capability sheet for ALLPCB, but I did made a couple of assumptions regarding the distance between the copper layers (Conductor Height) as it doesn't appear to be mentioned by ALLPCB.

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  • Design Your Own Raspberry Pi Compute Module PCB

    No, I haven't noticed any issues with the design so far and neither I have received any reports from others. As for the OSHPark listing you're referring to is it this one, https://oshpark.com/shared_projects/VVf0DE0r?Honestly, I don't really mind if someone wants manufacture and sell boards based on my design even unchanged. The fact though that the said person decided to upload just the gerber files without including the source KiCAD files, or at least a link to the GitHub repository so other can easily find them is something I don't particularly like. Thanks for letting me know, I'm not familiar with OSHPark but I'll see if I can find a way to contact the owner of the particular listing.

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  • Design Your Own Raspberry Pi Compute Module PCB

    Yeah, I've seen that project before, though the goal of my own project was a bit different. What I was trying to do is design a board that can work as a base for designing your own custom PCB. For this reason the design had to be as simple as possible, while still maintaining the majority of the most popular features found on the other Raspberry Pi boards.StereoPi may be nice and compact but in reality it's a quite complex board, so not really what I was after with mine. Changing my design to include a second camera connector isn't actually that hard. The thing is that that's a pretty niche feature that not many people need on a their projects, so it didn't make much sense to include it on the board by default and make the design more complex for no good reason.By the way, do you know w...

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    Yeah, I've seen that project before, though the goal of my own project was a bit different. What I was trying to do is design a board that can work as a base for designing your own custom PCB. For this reason the design had to be as simple as possible, while still maintaining the majority of the most popular features found on the other Raspberry Pi boards.StereoPi may be nice and compact but in reality it's a quite complex board, so not really what I was after with mine. Changing my design to include a second camera connector isn't actually that hard. The thing is that that's a pretty niche feature that not many people need on a their projects, so it didn't make much sense to include it on the board by default and make the design more complex for no good reason.By the way, do you know where I can find the design files for the StereoPi? Because I've looked and I couldn't figure out where to get them.

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  • magkopian's instructable Design Your Own Raspberry Pi Compute Module PCB's weekly stats: 6 months ago
    • Design Your Own Raspberry Pi Compute Module PCB
      31,111 views
      121 favorites
      14 comments
  • Design Your Own Raspberry Pi Compute Module PCB

    What drove your decision to power VBAT with 5V, and not 3.3V? Smaller 3.3V regulator required?One of my goals for the board was to have a 40 pin GPIO header that will be pin to pin compatible with the preexisting Raspberry Pi boards. This makes it easier for people (including me) who have already designed a project around let's say a RPi3, and want to transition to a single Compute Module based PCB. Furthermore, it maintains compatibility with preexisting Raspberry Pi HATs which is nice.Have you experienced any lock ups with your design as it appears the there is no facility for this on the 3.3/1.8V rails?No, I haven't had issue such issues, but since I'm using two linear regulator both powered from the same 5V power source they should be coming up pretty much at the same time. I haven'...

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    What drove your decision to power VBAT with 5V, and not 3.3V? Smaller 3.3V regulator required?One of my goals for the board was to have a 40 pin GPIO header that will be pin to pin compatible with the preexisting Raspberry Pi boards. This makes it easier for people (including me) who have already designed a project around let's say a RPi3, and want to transition to a single Compute Module based PCB. Furthermore, it maintains compatibility with preexisting Raspberry Pi HATs which is nice.Have you experienced any lock ups with your design as it appears the there is no facility for this on the 3.3/1.8V rails?No, I haven't had issue such issues, but since I'm using two linear regulator both powered from the same 5V power source they should be coming up pretty much at the same time. I haven't made any rise time measurements though to be honest.On the official IO board they use a dual regulator and have created an RC delay between the enable pins to ensure they are brought up sequentially.That was actually what I was planning doing at first, but I opted to using a couple of linear regulators to keep things simple and also make sure that my power rails are nice and noise free.

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  • Design Your Own Raspberry Pi Compute Module PCB

    And not only that, but literally a day after publishing my project the Raspberry Pi Foundation releases the CM3+. I really don't think the timing could be any better.

    Well, not strictly required, with a few changes on the design you could make the flashing of the eMMC possible without the need for the IO board. However, if you need to do any serious development you need the IO board as it gives you access to a lot more connectors to experiment with and all the GPIO pins of the CM. The IO board itself may be a bit pricey but you only have to buy it once and use it for the development of any project.

    Thanks, actually I was also thinking about working on a board that will feature Ethernet with PoE for some time. Maybe this will be one of my next projects.

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  • Design Your Own Raspberry Pi Compute Module PCB

    Honestly, the particular board was probably the most expensive personal project I've worked on so far. The PCBs alone ended up costing me near 80€, but that's to be expected from a medium size 4 layer PCB with gold finish plus the cost of DHL shipping from China. As for the components, I think I ended up paying roughly 100€ and that without including the Compute Module. And that's partly because when I design a new board I tend to buy genuine parts from reputable suppliers like TME and Mouser in order to avoid headaches.This project though is probably not a very good example on what to expect regarding the cost of designing a custom PCB. For example, if I only needed a 2 layer board of the same size and without gold finish which is most often the case, I'd probably wouldn't have paid ov...

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    Honestly, the particular board was probably the most expensive personal project I've worked on so far. The PCBs alone ended up costing me near 80€, but that's to be expected from a medium size 4 layer PCB with gold finish plus the cost of DHL shipping from China. As for the components, I think I ended up paying roughly 100€ and that without including the Compute Module. And that's partly because when I design a new board I tend to buy genuine parts from reputable suppliers like TME and Mouser in order to avoid headaches.This project though is probably not a very good example on what to expect regarding the cost of designing a custom PCB. For example, if I only needed a 2 layer board of the same size and without gold finish which is most often the case, I'd probably wouldn't have paid over 25€ for 10 boards. Also, some parts like the SODIMM connector are quite pricey but that's a type of connector you don't use often. I'd say 50€ total for each project that involves a custom PCB is probably a good average.As for the complexity of the project, yeah, if you are just starting out you probably want to start with something simpler. Probably start playing around with an Arduino and from there start learning about PCB design and eventually move your project to a custom board.

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  • Raspberry Pi Zero HDMI / WiFi Soldering Microscope

    The list of the parts I used is on "Step 1: Tools and Parts", but pretty much yeah the important parts are the monitor, the HDMI cable, the microSD card, the camera module and the Pi itself. Unless you just want to stream the video over the network in which case the monitor and the HDMI cable aren't needed.As long as you follow the steps of making the filesystem read-only you don't need a button to send the shutdown signal to the Pi, you can simply unplug the power without risking the filesystem getting corrupted.

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  • Raspberry Pi Zero HDMI / WiFi Soldering Microscope

    You need the following three lines in your fstab because you want /tmp, /var/log and /var/tmp to be moved on RAM in order to be writable. If you don't do that you're going to have issues, such sudo not working properly for not being able to write on /var/tmp.tmpfs /tmp tmpfs nosuid,nodev 0 0tmpfs /var/log tmpfs nosuid,nodev 0 0 tmpfs /var/tmp tmpfs nosuid,nodev 0 0

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  • Raspberry Pi Zero HDMI / WiFi Soldering Microscope

    It should be,raspivid -t 0 -w 1920 -h 1080 -fps 30 -b 2000000 -o - | gst-launch-1.0 -v fdsrc ! h264parse ! rtph264pay config-interval=1 pt=96 ! gdppay ! tcpserversink host=192.168.1.56 port=5000without the "<>".

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  • magkopian followed voltlog1 year ago
      • Making My Own Trezor Crypto Hardware Wallet
      • Getting Started With E-Paper Display Modules
      • DIY Hakko T12 Compatible Soldering Station
  • Raspberry Pi Zero HDMI / WiFi Soldering Microscope

    I've noticed that as well, I don't know maybe it's a bug with the website. There were made a lot of interface changes on Instructables lately, so that could be a possible explanation.

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  • Raspberry Pi Zero HDMI / WiFi Soldering Microscope

    That is probably more useful than my version, since this way you can still work with a board on a PCB vice or just directly on your bench. Unfortunately, that is not an option for me because I always have my fume extractor hanging above the board I'm working on, unless of course I find a way to mount the camera on my fume extractor. Great job and thank you for sharing it.

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  • magkopian commented on magkopian's instructable Temperature and Humidity Monitor1 year ago
    Temperature and Humidity Monitor

    Ok, the issue is now fixed on the latest commit.

    I see, that's probably because there is no data for some hours of the day and that results to an undefined offset notice for those specific hours. I already had my database full of data when I was writing the web interface, so I've must missed that case. I'll take a closer look at this and update my code on GitHub, thanks for letting me know.

    I'm not really sure I understand your issue. In your database from bottom to top you have a 20°C measurement at 12 AM, then a 21°C at 1 AM, a 22°C at 2 AM, etc. And then this exactly what I also see on the chart. The chart is supposed to display an average of all the measurements taken by hour, if you have only a single measurement for that hour of the day this is what you'll see on the chart.

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  • magkopian's instructable Temperature and Humidity Monitor's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • Temperature and Humidity Monitor
      2,043 views
      68 favorites
      4 comments
  • Picroscope: Low-Cost Interactive Microscope

    The amount of magnification you managed to achieve is very impressive, well done! I also like the fact that your design doesn't require a lot of material to print.Just one question, I see you're using OpenCV why exactly is that? Aren't you basically just doing live streaming?

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  • magkopian commented on psbass2001's instructable Huge Roman Numeral Clock1 year ago
    Huge Roman Numeral Clock

    That looks rather high quality for a first instructable, good documentation and very nice and clear pictures.Just one small tip. I see that all your measurements appear to be in inches, so I think that if you could include the conversion to mm next to each one it would be very handy. Instructables is an international website and many of us are not familiar with the Imperial system, and having to use Google to convert from inches to mm all the time can get quite tedious.

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  • magkopian commented on W4KRL's instructable Dollar Store Soldering Iron Tip Cleaner1 year ago
    Dollar Store Soldering Iron Tip Cleaner

    I've heard that thermally shocking your tip by using a wet sponge creates microcracks, which as a result limits the lifespan of your tip. Not sure how much truth is in that, but that's what I've heard.

    Not doubting your experience, as I said this is just what I've heard and I don't actually know if it's the truth or just a myth. I just thought it would be a good idea to mention it just to add to the discussion. Anyway, personally the main reason that I prefer the brass sponge is because I find it more convenient, not becuase I'm concerned about the life of my tip.

    Maybe it's just me, but I always had the impression that brass sponges made a better job for cleaning my tip compared to the copper ones. I get mine from eBay they only cost about 1€ as well.

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  • magkopian commented on magkopian's instructable Temperature and Humidity Monitor1 year ago
    Temperature and Humidity Monitor

    Thank you! This is actually my first attempt of designing an enclosure for one of my projects. I'm really happy with how it turned out.

    Thanks! Don't forget to post some pictures if you do. By the way, I should mention that the LCD is in fact optional. So, if you want to make a few of them and put them in different places just for collecting data you can. I will likely also design a small case for people who want to use it without an LCD.

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  • magkopian commented on MakersBox's instructable RPi MacroScope1 year ago
    RPi MacroScope

    Very nice project. I think the only thing missing now is an IR receiver, so you’ll be able to take pictures without the risk of shaking the camera when you push the button. But I guess since your Pi already has WiFi, this could also be implemented purely as a software based solution by using an app on your phone as remote.

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  • magkopian commented on magkopian's instructable Raspberry Pi Cloud IP Camera With POE1 year ago
    Raspberry Pi Cloud IP Camera With POE

    In my project I'm using an active PoE splitter together with the Pi. So, if you do the same you'll need to use either an active PoE injector, or a router with PoE support built in. Any router or injector which supports the 802.3af standard should work.

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  • Raspberry Pi Zero HDMI / WiFi Soldering Microscope

    Thanks for the link, I added a mention to your project after the project overview.

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  • Raspberry Pi Zero HDMI / WiFi Soldering Microscope

    That looks amazing! Please let me know when you upload the files, I'd really like to give a mention to your project on my intructable.

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  • PIC18 Development Board With Ethernet and USB

    As far as I know, basically the only difference between 18F4550 and 18F4553 is that the later has a 12-bit ADC. In fact, if I'm not mistaken they are so similar that a hex file compiled for one should also work for the other. So, to answer your question no you don't need to change anything, the same PCB design will work for both.

    By the way, the datasheet for the PIC18F2458/2553/4458/4553 is only 46 pages compared to the one for PIC18F2455/2550/4455/4550 which is 430. And basically only thing it does is list the minor difference between the two.

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  • Raspberry Pi Zero HDMI / WiFi Soldering Microscope

    Are you using hot glue as a light diffuser for the LEDs? Never thought of that actually, keeping it in the back of my head for future projects. Thanks for sharing!

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  • magkopian made the instructable Homemade DIY Caliper in 30 Minutes!2 years ago
    Homemade DIY Caliper in 30 Minutes!

    Unfortunately, my printer just decided to run out of ink so I had to do the marking by hand. I'm only able to measure with a resolution of half a centimeter, but seems to work nonetheless. If I replace my ink cartridges and print the ruler pieces I should be able to measure 1mm quite accurately, which is at least the same resolution that a regular ruler provides.

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  • magkopian commented on Siliffe's instructable Homemade DIY Caliper in 30 Minutes!2 years ago
    Homemade DIY Caliper in 30 Minutes!

    I used the only caliper I had for the z-axis of my microscope and now, I have to wait a month for a new one to arrive from eBay. Using a ruler to measure widths is a really big pain, maybe I'll give your project a try and see how it goes until my new caliper arrives.

    I used the only caliper I had for the z-axis of my microscope and now, I have to wait a month for a new one to arrive from eBay. Using a ruler to measure widths is a really big pain, maybe I'll give your project a try and see how it goes until my new caliper arrives.

    I used the only caliper I had for the z-axis of my microscope and now, I have to wait for a new one to arrive from eBay. Using a ruler to measure widths is a really big pain, maybe I'll give your project a try and see how it goes until my new caliper arives.

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  • magkopian commented on vhaa's instructable ProBot - the Protesting Robot2 years ago
    ProBot - the Protesting Robot

    That looks really creepy, I'd really love to see this project among the winners of the robotics contest. Building a self-balancing robot at such a scale is quite an achievement.

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  • magkopian commented on magkopian's instructable SMD Decade Resistance Box2 years ago
    SMD Decade Resistance Box

    That's quite unfortunate, I just searched on eBay myself and surprisingly I wasn't able to find the rotary switch encoders with the right numbering. There were some listings which didn't display an image of the numbering at all, which might be the ones, but you're basically gambling with those.A lead that will extend all the way from 4 to 5, I think it's safe to assume that will add at least 50nH of parasitic inductance to each encoder. Which is not really that much, but still a considerable amount compared to the total inductance of the system that I calculated.Regarding the resistor size you are right, it is indeed 0805 not 0806. I'll update the article to fix this typo, thanks for pointing it out.

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  • How to Stretch Images Through Time With Space-time Camera and Processing

    I don't know if it was intentional, but the honeycomb pattern caused by the infill structure actually gives a really cool and unique look to the camera. Overall, the end product looks absolutely great.

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  • Raspberry Pi Zero HDMI / WiFi Soldering Microscope

    For capturing images you can use the following command,raspistill -o /path/to/image.jpgand this for video,raspivid -o /path/to/image.jpgWith both commands, you can use the -vf and -hf flags to flip the picture horizontally or vertically if needed.If you have a fully working microscope by following all the instructions I wrote about the software, you will need to stop the network-streaming service before using those commands, as you can't have two different processes accessing the camera the same time.Also, since the filesystem will be read-only, you will have to connect an external USB storage media to store the footage. Alternatively, if you just want to take a few pictures you can save them on /tmp until you download them to your computer, which will be mounted on RAM.While capturing ...

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    For capturing images you can use the following command,raspistill -o /path/to/image.jpgand this for video,raspivid -o /path/to/image.jpgWith both commands, you can use the -vf and -hf flags to flip the picture horizontally or vertically if needed.If you have a fully working microscope by following all the instructions I wrote about the software, you will need to stop the network-streaming service before using those commands, as you can't have two different processes accessing the camera the same time.Also, since the filesystem will be read-only, you will have to connect an external USB storage media to store the footage. Alternatively, if you just want to take a few pictures you can save them on /tmp until you download them to your computer, which will be mounted on RAM.While capturing video using the raspivid command the HDMI streaming will also remain active, so you can still use it as a microscope while recording.

    For capturing images you can use the following command,raspistill -o /path/to/image.jpgand this for video,raspivid -o /path/to/image.jpgIn both commands, you can use the -vf and -hf flags to rotate the picture horizontally or vertically if needed.If you have a fully working microscope by following all the instructions I wrote about the software, you will need to stop the network-streaming service before using those commands, as you can't have two different processes accessing the camera the same time.Also, since the filesystem will be read-only, you will have to connect an external USB storage media to store the footage. Alternatively, if you just want to take a few pictures you can save them on /tmp until you download them to your computer, which will be mounted on RAM.While capturing ...

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    For capturing images you can use the following command,raspistill -o /path/to/image.jpgand this for video,raspivid -o /path/to/image.jpgIn both commands, you can use the -vf and -hf flags to rotate the picture horizontally or vertically if needed.If you have a fully working microscope by following all the instructions I wrote about the software, you will need to stop the network-streaming service before using those commands, as you can't have two different processes accessing the camera the same time.Also, since the filesystem will be read-only, you will have to connect an external USB storage media to store the footage. Alternatively, if you just want to take a few pictures you can save them on /tmp until you download them to your computer, which will be mounted on RAM.While capturing video using the raspivid command the HDMI streaming will also remain active, so you can still use it as a microscope while recording.

    I got mine from The Pi Hut, they sell it for £9.60 which is about 11.30€ so a bit over than 10€ but still pretty close. They also offer pretty low cost shipping for destinations within the EU. As for the camera module and the camera cable, those can be found on eBay for as low as 6€ and 2€ respectively.

    For capturing images you can use the following command,raspistill -o /path/to/image.jpgand this for video,raspivid -o /path/to/image.jpgWith both commands, you can use the -vf and -hf flags to flip the picture horizontally or vertically if needed.If you have a fully working microscope by following all the instructions I wrote about the software, you will need to stop the network-streaming service before using those commands, as you can't have two different processes accessing the camera the same time.Also, since the filesystem will be read-only, you will have to connect an external USB storage media to store the footage. Alternatively, if you just want to take a few pictures you can save them on /tmp until you download them to your computer, which will be mounted on RAM.While capturing ...

    see more »

    For capturing images you can use the following command,raspistill -o /path/to/image.jpgand this for video,raspivid -o /path/to/image.jpgWith both commands, you can use the -vf and -hf flags to flip the picture horizontally or vertically if needed.If you have a fully working microscope by following all the instructions I wrote about the software, you will need to stop the network-streaming service before using those commands, as you can't have two different processes accessing the camera the same time.Also, since the filesystem will be read-only, you will have to connect an external USB storage media to store the footage. Alternatively, if you just want to take a few pictures you can save them on /tmp until you download them to your computer, which will be mounted on RAM.While capturing video using the raspivid command the HDMI streaming will also remain active, so you can still use it as a microscope while recording.

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  • Raspberry Pi Zero HDMI / WiFi Soldering Microscope

    There is no way to answer such a question, because there is no reference to measure the amount of magnification against. How much bigger everything will look to you, will depend on the physical size and the resolution of the monitor you're using, as well as your adjustment of the focal length of the lens.I personally used a 22'' monitor with a 1920x1080 resolution, so if you watch the video I've taken in such a monitor, you can see exactly how everything looked to me.

    There is no way to answer such a question, because there is no reference to measure the amount of magnification against. How much bigger everything will look to you, will depend on the physical size and the resolution of the monitor you're using, as well as your adjustment of the focal length of the lens.I personally used a 22'' monitor with a 1920x1080 resolution, so if you watch the video I've taken in such a monitor, you can see exactly how everything looked to me.

    There is no way to answer such a question, because there is no reference to measure the amount of magnification against. How much bigger everything will look to you, will depend on the physical size and the resolution of the monitor you're using, as well as your adjustment of the focal length of the lens.

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  • Convert an ATX PSU Into a Bench PSU That Measures Current

    The ACS712 chip is a hall effect current sensor, it measure the magnetic field produced by the electric current that passes through the IP+ and IP- pins. The direction of the current is what determines the direction of the magnetic field, and by measuring it the sensor can determine the direction of the current.So, to put it simply as long as the sensor is in series with the power source and the load, it doesn't matter the way you connect it. It will just give you the opposite sign than what you'd expect, just like when you measure current with a multimeter and you put it the other way around.You can find more information in the datasheet of the ACS712.

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  • magkopian commented on magkopian's instructable Raspberry Pi Cloud IP Camera With POE2 years ago
    Raspberry Pi Cloud IP Camera With POE

    Motion can be configured to do that, I just have disabled that particular feature because it's a bit too CPU intensive for a Raspberry Pi 1B+ and I didn't really need it.

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  • magkopian commented on magkopian's instructable Raspberry Pi Cloud IP Camera with POE2 years ago
    Raspberry Pi Cloud IP Camera with POE

    Yes, this can be done, you will need to configure your router to forward the combination of your Pi IP address with the port 8081 to an external port e.g. 17895. Then using the public IP address of your router and the port that you've set you can access the video feed over the Internet.

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  • PIC18 Development Board with Ethernet and USB

    Hi, sorry for the late reply but just now I've received an email notification from Instructables about your comment. Anyway, to answer now your questions, 1) In the circuit diagram given by you, you have connected + terminal of the capacitor to VSS (GND) and negative terminal to Vcap. Is it normal? No, this is actually a mistake on the schematic. It has been corrected on the latest reversion but looks like I forgot to update the schematic for some reason, thanks for catching this up I will soon get it fixed. 2) If its ok with you, can you please give me the idea about RJ45 connections made in PCB. I am using same RJ45 Magjack as you(the one you have listed) , yet i find it difficult to understand the numbering and the connections between RJ45 and ENC. If you got the same Mag...

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    Hi, sorry for the late reply but just now I've received an email notification from Instructables about your comment. Anyway, to answer now your questions, 1) In the circuit diagram given by you, you have connected + terminal of the capacitor to VSS (GND) and negative terminal to Vcap. Is it normal? No, this is actually a mistake on the schematic. It has been corrected on the latest reversion but looks like I forgot to update the schematic for some reason, thanks for catching this up I will soon get it fixed. 2) If its ok with you, can you please give me the idea about RJ45 connections made in PCB. I am using same RJ45 Magjack as you(the one you have listed) , yet i find it difficult to understand the numbering and the connections between RJ45 and ENC. If you got the same MagJack with me just follow the traces on the PCB design file and this is exactly how it should be connected to the ENC28J60. I also have labeled the pins of the connector on the schematic, so it should be pretty much straightforward. 3) I am using the general purpose PCB and through hole components. Do you think that might affect the performance or the operation of PCB. Please suggest me the considerations to be made, if any in my case. No matter how crazy this sounds, I've actually built the very first prototype on a perfboard and it worked, so it is definitely possible. I had all sorts of issues with noise though, so this is something that I definitely not recommend doing if you can avoid it. If you are really interested in this project though, you can find pretty cheap PCB manufactures from China that will produce about 10 boards of this for as low as 20€. This what I actually did a few months after posting this instructable. In case you are instead, I will upload the Gerber files of the latest revision so you can just send them to your favorite manufacturer and with almost no effort get your hands into some professional made PCBs.

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  • KeyPi - A cheap portable Raspberry Pi 3 "Laptop" under $80

    It's a 2200 mAh lithium ion cell, typically found inside laptop batteries but can also buy them on eBay. Based on a rough estimation, combined with the boost converter it will keep the Pi together with a TFT screen up and running for at least one hour.

    It's a 2200 mAh lithium ion cell, typically found inside laptop batteries but you can also buy them on eBay. Based on a rough estimation, combined with the boost converter it will keep the Pi together with a TFT screen up and running for at least one hour.

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  • magkopian commented on magkopian's instructable Raspberry Pi Cloud IP Camera with POE3 years ago
    Raspberry Pi Cloud IP Camera with POE

    I'd say since this is mostly for the purpose of learning, go for the Raspberry Pi 2 and also use the latest version of Raspbian which is Jessie instead of Wheezy as I did. The RPi2 will give you much better performance in comparison to a RPi B+, RPi3 is a bit more powerful that RPi2 but I wouldn't recommend it based on the fact that it has overheating issues and because of that I wouldn't trust it to be reliable enough for continuous operation.

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  • magkopian commented on magkopian's instructable Raspberry Pi Cloud IP Camera with POE3 years ago
    Raspberry Pi Cloud IP Camera with POE

    Hi, good to hear that my project inspired you to make something yourself. Now to your question, adding a speaker should be pretty much straightforward as the Pi already has an audio output jack, streaming audio though is going to be a bit more complicated. One solution to achieve this is by using the gStreamer framework, there is already plenty of information available on the Web about this topic and I'm pretty sure you will have no issue getting started.As for your second question, well the problem is that the Raspberry Pi has only one camera connector. You could of course try using USB webcams instead, but the performance will me much worse so better to stick to camera modules and one Pi per camera. I you really need two camera modules on the same Pi, you could buy a Raspberry Pi Comp...

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    Hi, good to hear that my project inspired you to make something yourself. Now to your question, adding a speaker should be pretty much straightforward as the Pi already has an audio output jack, streaming audio though is going to be a bit more complicated. One solution to achieve this is by using the gStreamer framework, there is already plenty of information available on the Web about this topic and I'm pretty sure you will have no issue getting started.As for your second question, well the problem is that the Raspberry Pi has only one camera connector. You could of course try using USB webcams instead, but the performance will me much worse so better to stick to camera modules and one Pi per camera. I you really need two camera modules on the same Pi, you could buy a Raspberry Pi Compute Module Kit but it is fairly expensive, so probably not worth it.

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