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4Instructables9,323Views5CommentsJoined July 24th, 2016
Recent CS grad, gravitating toward designs for the physical world. Love DIY innovation

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  • Control DC and Stepper Motors With L298N Dual Motor Controller Modules and Arduino

    I had similar issues, turns out the l298n is not well suited to driving low-impedance low voltage stepper motors (your motor is 2.9ohm and 2.0v giving a rated 0.7 amps) because at its working voltage it draws too much current and will quickly overheat. I recommend using a "chopper" style driver like the StepStick, they use current limiting and can work with these types of motors.

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  • ArDewpoint: Dew Point Based Ventilation Controller

    Glad you're finding it useful! I personally used to two relay module because it was both what I had in stock and I'm also controlling two fans, so it keeps them isolated and limits the amperage. In that case, I'm just switching the hot wire. I'm not super familiar with AC wiring so I can't give an expert opinion, but switching the neutral seems like it would only be beneficial as a failsafe for a place with unreliable wiring.

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  • ArDewpoint: Dew Point Based Ventilation Controller

    So cool that you made it! Funny to think that my code is running in someone's basement :P Thank's for finding that bug, I updated the Github. I'm definitely a fan of those Pro Mini's, super utilitatian.

    So cool that you made it! Funny to think that my code is running in someone's basement :P Thank's for finding that bug, I updated the Github. I'm definitely a fan of those Pro Mini's, super utilitarian.

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  • DIY Guitar Midi Controller (a.k.a. "Guitorgan")

    Glad your here you're working on a similar setup! Will it be a fully custom built? Unfortunately my rig is in storage across the country so I haven't been able to work on it. I'd really like to switch it over to a resistor array though to see if that eliminates noise into the pickups and also would only require a few analog inputs. I'd also love to miniaturize it and set it up for bluetooth so it's all contained on the guitar. Piezos are definitely an approach a lot of people take. Of course if you just do signal processing on you end up with the commercial synth projects that are already out there (and good)...though I do think having the actual fret data can have novel uses.How are you planning on doing the Midi messaging? I'm not particularly happy with the setup I'm using (a Midi-&g...

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    Glad your here you're working on a similar setup! Will it be a fully custom built? Unfortunately my rig is in storage across the country so I haven't been able to work on it. I'd really like to switch it over to a resistor array though to see if that eliminates noise into the pickups and also would only require a few analog inputs. I'd also love to miniaturize it and set it up for bluetooth so it's all contained on the guitar. Piezos are definitely an approach a lot of people take. Of course if you just do signal processing on you end up with the commercial synth projects that are already out there (and good)...though I do think having the actual fret data can have novel uses.How are you planning on doing the Midi messaging? I'm not particularly happy with the setup I'm using (a Midi-> serial bridge), and I recently discovered a language/framework called Max that's well suited to this sort of project.In terms of polyphony, as far as I can tell there is no obvious solution. If you play around fingering chords, for example doing an "F" shape both forwards and backwards, you will find that they create identical electrical circuits. The pro model, the Solange, does indeed use segmented frets, and it should say something if their engineering team couldn't figure out a solution. Of course segmented frets require some serious precision in your build!Capacitive sensing, where the sensors are on the actual fretboard themselves, are likely a viable option, and would enable polyphony. If you are doing a custom build, that could make in integrated. I did a google search and it looks like some research has been done : http://www.iiia.csic.es/guitarLab/research/sensors... and there is a patent out there. However there could be issues with it depending on the sensitivity of the sensors, will it be able to determine a finger being position closely (perhaps even resting on a string), from actually fretting? That being said, I've been thinking about the polyphony a bit, and it might be theoretically be possible. I said earlier that different chord shapes will create the same electrical circuit, but in theory these circuits aren't exactly identically. The path from fret to string, conductiong through adjacent string and frets is not the same, and potentially introduces resistance, meaning that by measuring resistance between frets and the strings we could determine what the exact chord is. If frets/strings had resistance on 1k Ohm/cm, this would be easy, but they are much better. However, if we had very precise resistance measuring, perhaps it would be possible.

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  • DIY Guitar Midi Controller (a.k.a. "Guitorgan")

    Hi Avashi. I'm excited to hear you're working on this project! Sorry for the lack of clarity with the Arduino to DAW connection.I would recommend checking the connection at each step. First verify Arduino<----->HairlessMidi, then HairlessMidi<---->LoopMidi, and finally LoopMidi<----->DAW. I've attached a screenshot of what HairlessMidi and LoopMidi should look like if Midi data is flowing from the Arduino.HairlessMidi, after you select the correct serial port the Arduino is on, should show Midi packets being received (make sure to check "debug MIDI messages") when you trigger strings on your guitar. If you are not seeing anything here, the problem is with the Arduino sending packets, possibly a wiring or code issue. Here's a simple test sketch that will send ...

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    Hi Avashi. I'm excited to hear you're working on this project! Sorry for the lack of clarity with the Arduino to DAW connection.I would recommend checking the connection at each step. First verify Arduino<----->HairlessMidi, then HairlessMidi<---->LoopMidi, and finally LoopMidi<----->DAW. I've attached a screenshot of what HairlessMidi and LoopMidi should look like if Midi data is flowing from the Arduino.HairlessMidi, after you select the correct serial port the Arduino is on, should show Midi packets being received (make sure to check "debug MIDI messages") when you trigger strings on your guitar. If you are not seeing anything here, the problem is with the Arduino sending packets, possibly a wiring or code issue. Here's a simple test sketch that will send Midi serial messages from your Arduino if this is the issue: https://github.com/mvniemi/midi_serial_test/blob/m...If you are seeing packets in Hairless, open up LoopMidi. Make sure you create a virtual loopMidi port with the "+" button, and then make sure Hairless has LoopMidi selected for both the the input and output. If this is setup right, and packets are flowing into Hairless, you should see activity in the "throughput" and "total data" columns for the LoopMidi port (this is visible in the screenshot).If all this is working, then the problem is between LoopMidi and your DAW. Personally I used Ableton, and just had to add a MIDI track connected to loopMIDI port. It helps if you have another working MIDI device so you can rule out issues with the DAW itself.Hope this helps!

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    • Hook Up Exponentially More Digital Buttons to Your Arduino With a Binary Encoder
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  • mvniemi's instructable DIY Guitar Midi Controller (a.k.a. "Guitorgan")'s weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • DIY Guitar Midi Controller (a.k.a. "Guitorgan")
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  • mvniemi's instructable Quick and Dirty RC Telemetry's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • Quick and Dirty RC Telemetry
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