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  • Amazing, Cheap & Easy, Cracked Gems & Marbles. for Fantasy & Crafts.

    You assume that all marbles are pretty much the same. Your marbles probably all came from just a few batches, from just a few manufacturers. If you could guarantee that everyone's marbles were the same as yours, and that everyone's thermal shocking procedures were like yours, then your could, perhaps, say that there's an "extremely small" chance of a marble shattering catastrophically.But that isn't the case.It would be an awful thing if someone would to douse an oversized "glassy" boulder, made of a different kind of glass than yours, in a icy bath that didn't quite cover it, and it shattered and shot glass shards into his eyes.Please don't take that risk.

    Re: "...a warning, there is an extremely small chance that the Glass may pop when in contact with the water. Because of this I recommend safety glasses during this step.""Recommend" is too weak. The hazard is not "extremely small." The risk is substantial, and safety glasses are essential. You should NEVER attempt this process without them!

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  • Infinity Mirror Table - the Easy Version

    Nice.A tiny typo: "One way mirror file" should be "One way mirror film"

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  • ncdave4life commented on seamster's instructable Restore a vintage power drill2 years ago
    Restore a vintage power drill

    Not if you keep it dry.

    I have one of these, It was my dad's; he died in 1962. I've never done anything to it except replace the power cord. I don't use it very often, but it still works fine.

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  • Make A Wi-fi Webcam From An Old Android Phone

    buteman is confused, depotdevoid. PeterV3 is correct.The purpose of giving a static local IP on the LAN to your camera/phone is so that the port-forwarding from the router will go to the right device.If you have a NAT-ing router (which everyone does, these days), the local IP address which devices on the LAN have is assigned by the router, through negotiation with the devices. Either side of the negotiation can be configured to give a predictable "static" local IP to a particular device. You can either configure the device to ask the DHCP server (in the router) for a particular IP address, or you can configure the router to give a particular IP address to a specified MAC address (which should be unique for each device). Either approach should get the desired result: your IP ca...

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    buteman is confused, depotdevoid. PeterV3 is correct.The purpose of giving a static local IP on the LAN to your camera/phone is so that the port-forwarding from the router will go to the right device.If you have a NAT-ing router (which everyone does, these days), the local IP address which devices on the LAN have is assigned by the router, through negotiation with the devices. Either side of the negotiation can be configured to give a predictable "static" local IP to a particular device. You can either configure the device to ask the DHCP server (in the router) for a particular IP address, or you can configure the router to give a particular IP address to a specified MAC address (which should be unique for each device). Either approach should get the desired result: your IP camera always gets the same local IP address.If you're setting up any kind of server in your house (which is what this is), it is nice to also have a static IP for your public IP address, but that generally costs money. An alternative is called Dynamic DNS (google it). Basically, a script runs on your computer or router which checks what IP address it has been assigned by your Internet Service Provider (ISP). If that address changes, the script makes the change in the DNS, so that, after a short outage, outsiders can find your server again.

    buteman is confused, depotdevoid. PeterV3 is correct.The purpose of giving a static local IP on the LAN to your camera/phone is so that the port-forwarding from the router will go to the right device.If you have a NAT-ing router (which everyone does, these days), the local IP address which devices on the LAN have is assigned by the router, through negotiation with the devices. Either side of the negotiation can be configured to give a predictable "static" local IP to a particular device. You can either configure the device to ask the DHCP server (in the router) for a particular IP address, or you can configure the router to give a particular IP address to a specified MAC address (which should be unique for each device). Either approach should get the desired result: your IP ca...

    see more »

    buteman is confused, depotdevoid. PeterV3 is correct.The purpose of giving a static local IP on the LAN to your camera/phone is so that the port-forwarding from the router will go to the right device.If you have a NAT-ing router (which everyone does, these days), the local IP address which devices on the LAN have is assigned by the router, through negotiation with the devices. Either side of the negotiation can be configured to give a predictable "static" local IP to a particular device. You can either configure the device to ask the DHCP server (in the router) for a particular IP address, or you can configure the router to give a particular IP address to a specified MAC address (which should be unique for each device). Either approach should get the desired result: your IP camera always gets the same local IP address.If you're setting up any kind of server in your house (which is what this is), it is nice to also have a static IP for your public IP address, but that generally costs money. An alternative is called Dynamic DNS (google it). Basically, a script runs on your computer or router which checks what IP address it has been assigned by your Internet Service Provider (ISP). If that address changes, the script makes the change in the DNS, so that, after a short outage, outsiders can find your server again.

    buteman is confused, depotdevoid. PeterV3 is correct.The purpose of giving a static local IP on the LAN to your camera/phone is so that the port-forwarding from the router will go to the right device.If you have a NAT-ing router (which everyone does, these days), the local IP address which devices on the LAN have is assigned by the router, through negotiation with the devices. Either side of the negotiation can be configured to give a predictable "static" local IP to a particular device. You can either configure the device to ask the DHCP server (in the router) for a particular IP address, or you can configure the router to give a particular IP address to a specified MAC address (which should be unique for each device). Either approach should get the desired result: your IP ca...

    see more »

    buteman is confused, depotdevoid. PeterV3 is correct.The purpose of giving a static local IP on the LAN to your camera/phone is so that the port-forwarding from the router will go to the right device.If you have a NAT-ing router (which everyone does, these days), the local IP address which devices on the LAN have is assigned by the router, through negotiation with the devices. Either side of the negotiation can be configured to give a predictable "static" local IP to a particular device. You can either configure the device to ask the DHCP server (in the router) for a particular IP address, or you can configure the router to give a particular IP address to a specified MAC address (which should be unique for each device). Either approach should get the desired result: your IP camera always gets the same local IP address.If you're setting up any kind of server in your house (which is what this is), it is nice to also have a static IP for your public IP address, but that generally costs money. An alternative is called Dynamic DNS (google it). Basically, a script runs on your computer or router which checks what IP address it has been assigned by your Internet Service Provider (ISP). If that address changes, the script makes the change in the DNS, so that, after a short outage, outsiders can find your server again.

    buteman is confused, depotdevoid. PeterV3 is correct.The purpose of giving a static local IP on the LAN to your camera/phone is so that the port-forwarding from the router will go to the right device.If you have a NAT-ing router (which everyone does, these days), the local IP address which devices on the LAN have is assigned by the router, through negotiation with the devices. Either side of the negotiation can be configured to give a predictable "static" local IP to a particular device. You can either configure the device to ask the DHCP server (in the router) for a particular IP address, or you can configure the router to give a particular IP address to a specified MAC address (which should be unique for each device). Either approach should get the desired result: your IP ca...

    see more »

    buteman is confused, depotdevoid. PeterV3 is correct.The purpose of giving a static local IP on the LAN to your camera/phone is so that the port-forwarding from the router will go to the right device.If you have a NAT-ing router (which everyone does, these days), the local IP address which devices on the LAN have is assigned by the router, through negotiation with the devices. Either side of the negotiation can be configured to give a predictable "static" local IP to a particular device. You can either configure the device to ask the DHCP server (in the router) for a particular IP address, or you can configure the router to give a particular IP address to a specified MAC address (which should be unique for each device). Either approach should get the desired result: your IP camera always gets the same local IP address.If you're setting up any kind of server in your house (which is what this is), it is nice to also have a static IP for your public IP address, but that generally costs money. An alternative is called Dynamic DNS (google it). Basically, a script runs on your computer or router which checks what IP address it has been assigned by your Internet Service Provider (ISP). If that address changes, the script makes the change in the DNS, so that, after a short outage, outsiders can find your server again.

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  • Split video into parts with Movie Maker

    Hint: After you're done editing with Windows Movie Maker, use Handbrake to convert it from .wmv to .mp4 (which typically reduces the size quite a bit).

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