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  • painfull commented on jbumstead's instructable Desktop Gigapixel Microscope4 months ago
    Desktop Gigapixel Microscope

    Getting 404's on those image links.

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  • How to Backup Hard Disk Using an External Device

    Having all of your 'daily use' data on an external drive is going to slow things down across the board. USB 3.0 is around 20% slower than SATA III. Are you willing to take an hour longer to get your work done every day? (~8 hours in a working day, minus lunch breaks and non-computer related tasks, ~5 hours of on-screen work time, add 20% for USB 3.0 connection = ~6 hours). Then you add the complexity of not having data in the obvious places - My Documents, My Pictures etc. Most programs store your stuff in the obvious places, looking to open files and save files, but having to navigate frequently to your external drive... add more time. Then you have your hidden data - AppData < Local and Roaming, ProgramData. Many programs still keep some of your data there, such as settings, prefer...

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    Having all of your 'daily use' data on an external drive is going to slow things down across the board. USB 3.0 is around 20% slower than SATA III. Are you willing to take an hour longer to get your work done every day? (~8 hours in a working day, minus lunch breaks and non-computer related tasks, ~5 hours of on-screen work time, add 20% for USB 3.0 connection = ~6 hours). Then you add the complexity of not having data in the obvious places - My Documents, My Pictures etc. Most programs store your stuff in the obvious places, looking to open files and save files, but having to navigate frequently to your external drive... add more time. Then you have your hidden data - AppData < Local and Roaming, ProgramData. Many programs still keep some of your data there, such as settings, preferences and licences. Your system image will capture these, but it will be separate to your external USB data, and somewhat out of date if you don't also do a full system image every time you do a data backup.Imaging your computer works fine to recover from major software failure / OS corruption, virus attack - where re-imaging your base system / OS is quicker than re-installing it along with drivers, updates and software packages like MS Office, Photoshop etc, however, imaging an entire OS with all of that software installed typically takes longer than backing up your data. And to keep the image reasonably up to date (with weekly Windows updates, Photoshop packages and updates, Java, Browsers etc) means imaging frequently. ALL software packages update regularly these days. You could use expensive software that is able to do that for you, like Acronis, and a huge external hard drive to keep these image updates rolling along.Then there's the issue of a 4-5 year old computer failing completely and having to replace it - usually not with the exact same model, which means driver issues when you re-image your system onto a new PC. And with Windows 10 licences being coded into firmware now, you get licence activation issues and have to do a base OS reinstall / repair anyway.The time you feel you are saving by having an image will probably be equal to the time spent doing 2 backups - 1 for your second drive containing all of your data, and the extra one for your system image. Then when it comes to a total system failure, the time you save by having an image is lost again fixing your driver issues or performing base OS repairs. Plus you are now adding a layer of complexity that the average user is not going to find easy to learn or execute flawlessly.I will always tell clients, and anyone who asks - do what you are capable of doing properly, and if you don't know how to do any kind of backup, at least use the built-in OS provided backup. Of the ~50% of my clients who do it regularly and properly, about 20% of those have a clue what they are doing. The rest are just "following the bouncing ball", then call me anyway when it all goes south.

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  • painfull commented on CSdude's instructable How to Make a PC6 months ago
    How to Make a PC

    If we're being completely honest here, this instructable is the equivalent of; Step 1. Purchase an engine for your car. Step 2. Place engine in car and secure with appropriate bolts. Step 3. Connect cables from car to correct points on engine. Step 4. Connect battery to engine. Step 5. Turn car on and see if it runs... etc. Your instructable is not incorrect, but it is highly inconclusive.There are many variables in each and every step of building a computer. It would be almost impossible to complete a successful build of a working computer with such basic instructions. Your drawings make a fair amount of sense to me, because I've done this a few times. But for someone attempting this for the first time, there would very likely be some confusion.There are also some basic safety consider...

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    If we're being completely honest here, this instructable is the equivalent of; Step 1. Purchase an engine for your car. Step 2. Place engine in car and secure with appropriate bolts. Step 3. Connect cables from car to correct points on engine. Step 4. Connect battery to engine. Step 5. Turn car on and see if it runs... etc. Your instructable is not incorrect, but it is highly inconclusive.There are many variables in each and every step of building a computer. It would be almost impossible to complete a successful build of a working computer with such basic instructions. Your drawings make a fair amount of sense to me, because I've done this a few times. But for someone attempting this for the first time, there would very likely be some confusion.There are also some basic safety considerations you have not mentioned, like wearing a static discharge strap. Some people say it's not necessary - this is likely because they have not yet lost an expensive piece of hardware due to static discharge.Perhaps you could include some basic handling instructions such as; Don't touch the pins in the CPU socket or the contacts on the CPU. Be sure to align the keyholes, or you may crack the edge of the CPU. Don't 'wiggle' parts into PCI sockets, or you may crack the pins or damage the socket. Be careful when inserting PCI cards, especially large GPU cards, as the bracket may touch and scratch the motherboard.There's a lot that can easily be done the wrong way here. You could review your instructions and include not only the 'steps' you took to put your computer together, but the things you had to consider when doing each step. You might find your instructable is 5 times longer, and a lot more helpful to someone who hasn't put a computer together before.

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  • Make Your Frying Pan Non Stick & Non Toxic

    Perhaps you should consider changing the title of your Instructable. People visit Instructables to learn how to do things they may not already know how to do. Most people cook typically 'sticky' foodstuffs with an oil or spray, to achieve exactly what you have shown here. Cooking with ghee doesn't really teach us something we didn't already know. IMHO you have used a misleading title - possibly just to bolster the view hits on your relatively new YouTube channel...?

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  • painfull commented on brandonelms's instructable Wooden Programmable Puzzle Box11 months ago
    Wooden Programmable Puzzle Box

    Wow. This would be a lot of fun to make, and to use. Can you add a video (or link to a video) of this project in action?

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  • Hell Fuel for Melting Iron. Charcoal, Coal and Coke.More Than 1500 Degrees Celcius (2732 °F)

    No worries. Happy to ...help, I guess. As English is not your native language, and you are posting on a primarily English content website, and posting an article in English, do you think the 7th possible definition for that word (according to thefreedictionary.com/inflame) is fine? As a native English speaker I assure you, it is never used in that context. 'Warming' a cake and 'baking' a cake are technically the same, and would achieve the same result. But nobody says 'I'm warming a cake' ;)I wish you all the best :)

    Sorry to do this, but the word 'inflame' is completely wrong for this context. 'inflame' is what your body parts do when they are infected. I'm pretty sure you meant to use 'ignite'. This is the logical / correct term for what you are describing. Otherwise, an interesting Instructable topic.

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  • painfull commented on DIYistheonlyway's instructable Ungarsk Vandmand1 year ago
    Ungarsk Vandmand

    Hi DIYistheonlyway,You have told us what it is called, and advised that to learn how to use it we should visit YouTube. I did that, and with both the Hungarian title and your suggestion of 'hungarian jellyfish' there were no conclusive results. Could you please explain what it does and what you might use it for? From your brief description of 'spin it over your head' I would assume it is some sort of toy. It seems too heavy to use as a lasso. Thanks.

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  • Noninvasive Detection of Alcohol Consumption Level in Drivers

    With the description provided, I'm wondering how you specifically identify the individual from which the device is taking a sample. If this is intended to be used in public places, and the device is 'non-invasive' (assuming no contact is required), the device must be sampling free-flowing air, which could come from a number of sources in the vicinity. If the process then is to 'reasonably' isolate individuals and test them one at a time, there are several breathalysers on the market that are non-invasive / non-contact. Just Google 'non-contact breathalysers'. I have experienced the use of one such device myself at a random roadside breath test. The officer points the machine at your mouth and asks you to recite the alphabet, or Mary Had a Little Lamb - depending on what mood they're in ...

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    With the description provided, I'm wondering how you specifically identify the individual from which the device is taking a sample. If this is intended to be used in public places, and the device is 'non-invasive' (assuming no contact is required), the device must be sampling free-flowing air, which could come from a number of sources in the vicinity. If the process then is to 'reasonably' isolate individuals and test them one at a time, there are several breathalysers on the market that are non-invasive / non-contact. Just Google 'non-contact breathalysers'. I have experienced the use of one such device myself at a random roadside breath test. The officer points the machine at your mouth and asks you to recite the alphabet, or Mary Had a Little Lamb - depending on what mood they're in :) - and a reading is taken from your exhaled breath. Yours being the only breath the device could be reading given reasonable isolation.Also, since no information is provided, and I can't decipher what your code does or how it interacts with the Green, Yellow and Red LED's, can you explain what they indicate? It's probably safe to assume 'no alcohol', 'some alcohol' and 'lots of alcohol', respectively, but when it comes to making accusations, especially where individual / human rights are concerned, you need to know fairly precisely the amount of alcohol a person has consumed based on the test performed, and make a judgement call from that detailed information. What level of alcohol consumption is acceptable? Unless of course the venue / event specifically requires 'zero alcohol'. Then a binary solution would suffice.I'm sure I could get this device to work from your instructions, but I would then want to know exactly how it works and what it is telling me. I think you should consider provide further instruction for the operation and use of this device, given the implications it will create when used.

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  • painfull commented on iceng's instructable Bright Super Pinhole Camera1 year ago
    Bright Super Pinhole Camera

    Don't you mean; approx. 240,000 miles to the moon? You wouldn't need this information for your Instructable to work, but it is good to know the true facts around the subject ;)

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  • painfull commented on DIYPro0505's instructable DIY Crypto Mining PC (ETH, XMR, ZEC)1 year ago
    DIY Crypto Mining PC (ETH, XMR, ZEC)

    Hi DanielB822, I live in QLD AUST, and we pay $0.1894 +GST for electricity through the day, a little less for night (off-peak). This website has a calculator for working out your profitability with any configuration of mining device with basic running costs (power consumption): https://goo.gl/xHQf2fIt tells me - don't try doing this in QLD AUST :s PROFIT PER MONTH: $-59.37

    I think you are over-explaining the components. If I'm reading a recipe for a chocolate layer cake and about to bake one, I probably know what flour is and how it works in a typical baking situation. If I'm reading your Instructable on how to build a Crypto Mining PC and considering making one myself, you should assume I know what the components do and how to build a regular PC ;)

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  • painfull commented on Creativity Buzz's instructable Speed Up Laptop / PC 1 year ago
    Speed Up Laptop / PC

    I have to agree with rafununu and russ_hensel. Current read / write speeds of SSD's are at least 5 times that of HDD's, but that alone will not make your computer 5 times faster at everything it does. Your video proves exactly this; 13 second boot is only twice as fast as 26 second boot.Definitely over-selling your project here. If you want to add some punch to your project landing page, advertise the fact the SSD will also make your computer lighter, less susceptible to data loss if dropped, and in most cases extend the battery life (depending on the condition of the battery). Those are all good selling points when it comes to laptops, because they are the most common gripes about laptops :)

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  • painfull commented on How-ToDo's instructable Wood Box Mod 1 year ago
    Wood Box Mod

    Hi Konstantin,I really like the box you made here. I don't know much about MOSFET's. Can you explain what function the circuit performs in this project? Also, you have inspired me to take a leap into woodworking, get some tools and finally make a new glasses case for my partner :) The cases you get when you buy the glasses never last as long as the glasses. The hinges break, or the 'snap-lock' stops working and you have to use a rubber band :s So thank you for that!

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  • painfull commented on 2014pceevnecrishi's instructable Fire Fighters Friend1 year ago
    Fire Fighters Friend

    Where does Alexa get these figures from? Who is reporting to Alexa how many people are on each floor? How is this data 'live' and accurate to the minute? When the fire occurs, how many people leave the building immediately, before emergency crews arrive? Can Alexa account for these people? It's all well and good to know how many people live in the building and on what floors before emergency crews arrive, but if 90% of those people get out of the building safely when the fire occurs, where do the emergency crews now have to concentrate their search efforts to find the remaining lost / trapped people?

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  • painfull commented on 2014pceevnecrishi's instructable Fire Fighters Friend1 year ago
    Fire Fighters Friend

    Hi 2014pceevnecrishi,First let me say a good lot of effort was put into your idea and presentation.Now I must say; I have worked in both I.T. and Firefighting for 15+ years, so I have a lot to say about this instructable, the first being; things don't work the way you think they would in a compartment fire environment, where air and internal surface temperatures are typically above several hundred degrees. The Walabot may detect a mouse in your walls given the temperature difference between concrete / plaster etc. and a warm blooded mammal, but you must consider that a compartment fire will have heated the walls, and also the occupants, to nearly the same temperature, even down low near the floor. Human = only 37 degrees C. If the floor is not above 37 degrees, then there is not suffici...

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    Hi 2014pceevnecrishi,First let me say a good lot of effort was put into your idea and presentation.Now I must say; I have worked in both I.T. and Firefighting for 15+ years, so I have a lot to say about this instructable, the first being; things don't work the way you think they would in a compartment fire environment, where air and internal surface temperatures are typically above several hundred degrees. The Walabot may detect a mouse in your walls given the temperature difference between concrete / plaster etc. and a warm blooded mammal, but you must consider that a compartment fire will have heated the walls, and also the occupants, to nearly the same temperature, even down low near the floor. Human = only 37 degrees C. If the floor is not above 37 degrees, then there is not sufficient fire in the room for the occupants to even become trapped in the first place. They could likely still find the door and walk out. eg: stove / cooking fire.The greatest challenge for a firefighter, even when in the same room as trapped occupants and using some of the best thermal imaging cameras available to aid in search and rescue (because you cannot see through smoke, so you are looking for 'human' shapes and movement at best), is that the occupants and everything in the room are close to the same temperature.Try this paper (http://fire.nist.gov/bfrlpubs/fire02/PDF/f02082.pdf) for calculating room temperatures in compartment fires. A nutshell example: a 5m x 5m room with a 2m ceiling at flashover (roughly 3:30 minutes for a typical living room) will have an average air temperature in excess of 220 degrees C, which means down low (floor): around 70 degrees C. and up high (ceiling): over 700 degrees C.Think on that a little and see if you come up with some improvements on your concept. If you can fill some gaps, I'm sure rescue crews would be very interested ;)

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  • painfull commented on kaelanib's instructable How to set up a camera in manual mode2 years ago
    How to set up a camera in manual mode

    You're welcome kaelanib. Not a bad effort for a first attempt. Clear instructions, and I don't think you missed anything. Hope you keep at it and contribute more instructables. Why not tackle something that people won't find in the manual, like how to take a sharp macro photo, or perhaps star photography. Seems you have an interest in, and understanding of photography. I think you could handle it.

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  • painfull commented on kaelanib's instructable How to Set Up a Camera in Manual Mode2 years ago
    How to Set Up a Camera in Manual Mode

    "Pro" here... and, no. Incorrect. We use the setting(s) required to get the shot we want. Your assumption is the same as saying "all pro golfers use either a 1 wood or a 9 iron". What about putting, or pitching out of a sand trap?Also, knowing what those settings are doesn't even come close to making you a "Pro".

    Have to agree with you there Pete. Becoming a seasoned pro takes.... seasons I guess :) And possibly many of them. kaelanib's first instructable though. Could probably go a little easier on them. Learning curve mate ;)

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