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  • paul.f.mele commented on -BALES-'s instructable Shop Organization Tips and Practices6 months ago
    Shop Organization Tips and Practices

    Great job on a difficult, perhaps infinite subject. I do more car and metal work than woodworking these days, but many ideas apply to both.Here’s some more food for thought:tools are cheap; the place to store and use them is expensive.the floor is not a shelf; in other words, workspace is not storage space. Car guys seems to enjoy stepping over broken transmissions and what-not on the way to the toolbox. Consider a cheap weather proof separate building / shed / shipping container if you have the space. If not, store things high up on shelves. Lower= more often needed; higher =less often. Keep the floor free of”stuff”!make your workspace comfortable and well- lit. Insulate,heat,cool,music,baby fridge...as appropriate. I’m a retired surgeon...do your think surgeons do their best...

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    Great job on a difficult, perhaps infinite subject. I do more car and metal work than woodworking these days, but many ideas apply to both.Here’s some more food for thought:tools are cheap; the place to store and use them is expensive.the floor is not a shelf; in other words, workspace is not storage space. Car guys seems to enjoy stepping over broken transmissions and what-not on the way to the toolbox. Consider a cheap weather proof separate building / shed / shipping container if you have the space. If not, store things high up on shelves. Lower= more often needed; higher =less often. Keep the floor free of”stuff”!make your workspace comfortable and well- lit. Insulate,heat,cool,music,baby fridge...as appropriate. I’m a retired surgeon...do your think surgeons do their best work in a dark,cold,dingy,messy,cluttered,disorganized operating room? We’re supposed to be having fun doing these hobbies, aren't we?As the author notes, make each work area self-sufficient. If you can afford duplicate screwdrivers, hammers,drills...put one at each workstation that needs it. If bit changing requires a 1/8th Allen, leave a T wrench right next to the bits.Arrange your tools for “frequently used” vs “special use” . FWIW, get the highest quality “frequently used” tools you can afford.Wheels on the big tools are a must. Rather than suffer with “locking wheels”, I just raise the tool base up with a lever bar and slip a brick under each corner to make the tool stable. In the metal shop, tools are heavier, so some are on pallets, to be moved with a pallet jack instead. Better yet, keep your eyes out for an old fork lift. I found a 1966 Allis Chalmers 15 years ago for $500. Now it’s easy to store heavy stuff high up on those shelves! Every square foot of space is expensive, so why not fill it right up to the ceiling? Even if your shop space only cost you $30/sq ft, the forklift will pay for itself if you stack 16 sq ft of stuff.if you have a long wall, make all of your tools for cross cutting,routing,edge sanding,jointing, thickness planing at the same height. Each one (on wheels) will support the infeed/outfeed/cutoff of the others.if you have compressed air, plumb a permanent blowgun with its own regulator (20 psi or so) at each workstation for cleaning dust away from the fence.consider a shower curtain or two to contain dust in the sanding area. Ditto around your “clean areas” e.g. painting or snacking areas. 1/2 inch EMT makes an easy track, and hanging hardware is readily available.the author covered many of these ideas...thanks for letting me comment/ augment them a bit.

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  • All About Tapping for Screws and Bolts

    FYI, I looked up cast iron....it's the graphite that makes it inherently lubricated.Machinery's Handbook has a Table for what fluids to use for drilling, tapping, milling, turning. One bottle goes a long way. splurge for the right stuff...you'll get smoother surfaces, bits last longer, taps won't break...for a penny's worth of the right fluid.

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  • All About Tapping for Screws and Bolts

    i suggest that you splurge for proper cutting oil....small amount of real cutting fluid, kerosene, mineral spirits, coconut oil will last a long time....

    nice intro. thanks for taking the time.I've found that chips aren't much problem for outside threading,...reversing every 1 turn is OK.for tapping, I back out every 1/2 turn.the spiral tip (not to be confused with spiral flute) taps do work well in an open hole when you get your milling machine. (spiral flute for blind holes....pulls the chips up better)cast iron is inherently slippery (I think it's the Zinc, but one of the components in any event), hence no tapping fluid needed. I've had apprentices use my (steel) cutting oil anyway without any ill effect that I could see.

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  • 10 Ways to Keep Dust Under Control While Remodeling

    Ditto the double thickness SheetRock for sag/ strength.For soundproofing, think of your tin-can telephone..... 2 diaphragms connected by a tight string. The SheetRock on each side of the 2x4 studs is a tin-can, and the 2x4s are the rigid string connecting them. The cavities are not the conductors of the sound.Solution is separately framed walls, 2x3s on 24 inch centers, with studs alternately spaced/offset every 12 inches. One inch space between the 2 rows of sill plates. Now there is no "string" connecting the diaphragms. Filling the cavity makes a small improvement. Not my research.... Saw it long ago when designing our 2nd house.

    Ditto. Doing this for years. Way more effective than vacuum.

    Roger that. FYI, 1 mm is about 40 mils, so 5 mm is 200 mils.Someday, we'll all use one measuring system.

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