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  • Home Carbonation Setup for Unlimited Seltzer

    Here's the link to the excel file - https://cdn.instructables.com/ORIG/F94/Y0EX/IFUELPVQ/F94Y0EXIFUELPVQ.xlsx

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  • Home Carbonation Setup for Unlimited Seltzer

    The McCann carbonator has 2 backflow valves. One is located right after the pump and the other at the carbonation tank at the CO2 inlet. This ensures carbonated water doesn't flow into the CO2 tubing and of course, ensures the carbonated water doesn't escape into the household water supply. It has to be higher pressure than the water inlet. You can also look up McCann carbonator parts diagram to view exactly where it is. As it's a commercial unit, parts should be readily available unlike household units where if something breaks, you may as well trash the whole unit.For the Kegerator, I can't be certain where to drill as I don't have one but I'm sure there's plenty of non-critical spots to create a hole. Leave it off for a while then turn it on to feel around to ensure the spot ...

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    The McCann carbonator has 2 backflow valves. One is located right after the pump and the other at the carbonation tank at the CO2 inlet. This ensures carbonated water doesn't flow into the CO2 tubing and of course, ensures the carbonated water doesn't escape into the household water supply. It has to be higher pressure than the water inlet. You can also look up McCann carbonator parts diagram to view exactly where it is. As it's a commercial unit, parts should be readily available unlike household units where if something breaks, you may as well trash the whole unit.For the Kegerator, I can't be certain where to drill as I don't have one but I'm sure there's plenty of non-critical spots to create a hole. Leave it off for a while then turn it on to feel around to ensure the spot you're interested in drilling through doesn't get hot. When you drill, just be careful to only drill deep enough to break through the exterior sheet metal. Once through, use a screwdriver to carefully dig out the insulation foam until you hit the interior plastic. If you don't see or feel a thin pipe then you should be good to go to keep drilling through to complete your hole. Good luck!

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  • Home Carbonation Setup for Unlimited Seltzer

    I just used a drill and dremel with a cut off wheel to cut the holes. It's not that difficult since going through the fridge you just have to ensure you're not hitting any refrigerant lines. I was lucky in that the fridge had the lines running through the sides and not through the top or the back. You can just feel for it to see if it gets hot when the compressor is on. If it does, try to avoid it. If it doesn't, it should be safe to cut through. You're really only piercing the metal sheet exterior and at that point, you can stick something in to dig through the insulation gently to ensure you're not messing with piping. Once through, then again, you're piercing plastic/metal sheet on the inside. I tried insulating with just Roxul but you could use expanding foam or even playdoh...

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    I just used a drill and dremel with a cut off wheel to cut the holes. It's not that difficult since going through the fridge you just have to ensure you're not hitting any refrigerant lines. I was lucky in that the fridge had the lines running through the sides and not through the top or the back. You can just feel for it to see if it gets hot when the compressor is on. If it does, try to avoid it. If it doesn't, it should be safe to cut through. You're really only piercing the metal sheet exterior and at that point, you can stick something in to dig through the insulation gently to ensure you're not messing with piping. Once through, then again, you're piercing plastic/metal sheet on the inside. I tried insulating with just Roxul but you could use expanding foam or even playdoh around the holes. The purpose really isn't to insulate the holes but rather just seal it so that air doesn't pass through. If you have air passing through, you're fridge will build up frost quickly. For the shrink wrap, I bought several feet of construction/boat shrink wrap off of ebay. It's fairly inexpensive stuff and gives it a nice clean look.

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  • piyoman commented on piyoman's instructable Home Carbonation Setup for Unlimited Seltzer2 months ago
    Home Carbonation Setup for Unlimited Seltzer

    Hi Chuck, I don't believe you can adjust the actual water pump pressure for the McCann unit. I was advising adjusting the CO2 pressure coming out of the regulator and into the McCann unit. The tank should have a float so that once the water levels reaches a minimum, it will trigger the pump to force the water in. If the CO2 pressure is lower than the water pressure, water will flow freely into the carbonator without ever triggering the float and pump. This also means, only water will go into the tank and not the CO2 (thus no carbonated water). When you have a higher CO2 pressure than the household water pressure, every time you dispense some carbonated water, the tank will fill with CO2. However once the water level reaches the minimum point, the McCann pump trigger and will force...

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    Hi Chuck, I don't believe you can adjust the actual water pump pressure for the McCann unit. I was advising adjusting the CO2 pressure coming out of the regulator and into the McCann unit. The tank should have a float so that once the water levels reaches a minimum, it will trigger the pump to force the water in. If the CO2 pressure is lower than the water pressure, water will flow freely into the carbonator without ever triggering the float and pump. This also means, only water will go into the tank and not the CO2 (thus no carbonated water). When you have a higher CO2 pressure than the household water pressure, every time you dispense some carbonated water, the tank will fill with CO2. However once the water level reaches the minimum point, the McCann pump trigger and will force water into the tank. To diagnose the problem, first purge the carbonator of air. Close the CO2 regulator valve (0 psi), turn on the water and open the bleeder valve at the top of the tank (black or red flip switch). Take care when opening the valve as water will gush out once the tank is full. I usually place a towel on top with my finger on the trigger to close immediately once I feel the towel getting wet. Once the tank is full of water, turn on the CO2 regulator to dispense at 70-80 psi (assuming your water is at 60 psi). Now start dispensing the water as if you were filling a refreshing cup of sparkling water. CO2 should now be replacing the dispensed water in the tank. You should be able to start emptying the tank until the pump kicks in. If you never hear the pump turning on and you've practically drained the tank twice over something is wrong with the pressures. Either the water pressure is too high or the CO2 pressure is too low. Of course, double check that your pump is powered as well. If you have CO2 coming out of the spout that means the float/pump isn't turning on. If you have a non-stop water supply that means the water pressure is greater than the CO2 pressure. I hope this helps. If you have further problems, please describe in detail what the problem is. If this works give an update!

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  • piyoman commented on piyoman's instructable Home Carbonation Setup for Unlimited Seltzer10 months ago
    Home Carbonation Setup for Unlimited Seltzer

    Thanks for sharing your experiences! I'm sure others will also find this helpful. I also had some problems finding the exact right crimp and hose combination but I just put 2 on and crimped it really tight. Works like a charm!

    Thanks! I hope it gives you inspiration to do something like this in the future!

    Yes, it could be. Household faucets are typically made out of brass which is cheaper than stainless steel. Just a word of caution brass can leech into your carbonated water. Lavatory faucets usually have an aerator near the tip. This, as well as the flow control in the handle could agitate the water enough that most of the co2 would dissipate right after pouring your glass of seltzer. Getting a beer faucet would be the best solution but I know the Perlick 650ss can be quite expensive. An alternative would be to use an inexpensive beer faucet and experiment around with different lengths of tubing. Beer faucet have a simple ball valve so the flow is relatively uninterrupted, keeping most of your co2 in your glass before consumption. If you have too much pressure and a short length...

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    Yes, it could be. Household faucets are typically made out of brass which is cheaper than stainless steel. Just a word of caution brass can leech into your carbonated water. Lavatory faucets usually have an aerator near the tip. This, as well as the flow control in the handle could agitate the water enough that most of the co2 would dissipate right after pouring your glass of seltzer. Getting a beer faucet would be the best solution but I know the Perlick 650ss can be quite expensive. An alternative would be to use an inexpensive beer faucet and experiment around with different lengths of tubing. Beer faucet have a simple ball valve so the flow is relatively uninterrupted, keeping most of your co2 in your glass before consumption. If you have too much pressure and a short length of hose though (without a flow control faucet) the water would spray everywhere upon pouring. Having a longer length of hose would slow down that flow until you get it just right. What you currently save from buying a proper faucet you may waste in co2 over the life of this appliance. Hope this helps! Good luck!

    That's great to hear! A kegerator would definitely be ideal but unfortunately it's pricier compared to a basic fridge. I'm sure it's a much cleaner set up though!

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  • Home Carbonation Setup for Unlimited Seltzer

    Looks great! It keeps it simple when the carbonator can be kept as-is. I was also considering putting the final filter between the tap and the RO tank but with limited space I just chose to leave all the filters outside of the fridge. I haven't noticed any unusual tastes from the tank. If you can share some pictures of inside the fridge too it could give others additional configuration options. Thanks for commenting!

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  • Home Carbonation Setup for Unlimited Seltzer

    There's an adapter that converts the 3/8" OD tubing to a barb fitting so I can attach 1/4" ID hose directly. This is for the flat water faucet - http://www.installationpartssupply.com/category/f...For the seltzer line, I just connected the 1/4" ID hose directly to the carbonator tank using a 3/8" swivel nut to 1/4" barb connector. No leaks whatsoever.The system works great. It's been flawless since I posted this instructable. I've refilled the co2 tank once 3 months ago and I also changed out the RO sediment filters once. Everything has been working fine without a hitch. Good luck!

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  • Home carbonation setup for unlimited seltzer

    Good for you! I'm glad this build is helpful to you. I think either hard wiring it or replacing the connector with a standard 3 prong is fine. Whichever works best for you. Since I've assembled it I haven't found any need to take it apart. If you hard wire it means that one less thing to worry about if anything goes wrong. Though having the ability to disconnect the pump could be useful if you need to change/manuever anything around. When I was hooking up my system I forgot once or twice to connect the pump which made troubleshooting a tad difficult. Doh! :)

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  • Home carbonation setup for unlimited seltzer

    The only feasible beer faucet that I found was the Perlick 650ss as it has a built-in flow control. This will allow you to dial down the high pressure of the seltzer without requiring any additional hardware. The difference in costs is most likely due to supply and demand. There just isn't enough home users that desire a dedicated seltzer setup thus the hardware that exists geared primarily to commercial establishments. Beer enthusiasts however, is a different story. With the homebrew market expanding and the lines being blurred between commercial and home users this has driven a thriving market for all sorts of beer supplies. Luckily seltzer users can also benefit.Hope this helps!

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