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  • srcpt commented on pilx's instructable Floating Dock With Barrels (UPDATED)2 years ago
    Floating Dock With Barrels (UPDATED)

    I scored two 10' by 4' wood docks for free. After reconditioning (all new deck screws and turn over the deck boards so good side is up) I'm ready to think about flotation. I can get plastic barrels for $5 each. But, I don't want the dock to be that high off the water. I was thinking of cutting the barrels in half and filling each half with expanding foam. Much easier to get in and out of kayaks and rowing shells if the dock is only a few inches off the water. There is an expanding foam product for setting fence posts which is $9 a bag at Menards. Anyone have any thoughts about this idea?

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  •  Sawfish, an Unsinkable, Lightweight, Foam Kayak (23 Lbs). Free DIY Kayak Plans, the Hardware Store Boat

    Thanks. I'll use the "waste" from the corners to build out a short section on each side.

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  •  Sawfish, an Unsinkable, Lightweight, Foam Kayak (23 Lbs). Free DIY Kayak Plans, the Hardware Store Boat

    I was able to get four 2'x8'x2" sheets of Dow XPS very cheap. I have butterfly scarfed a 12' sheet and ready to draw out my pattern. Just wondering if 24" beam is enough? If wider, should I do two halves (14" at the widest) with a joint down the center line to get a 28" beam or add two inches on each side at the widest part of the bottom? FYI, I tried cutting the first cut (8 feet down to four feet) with a jigsaw using a Bosch soft materials blade. Clean cut with no dust, but I was unable to keep the blade from bending and thus cutting straight. I then tried the same blade in a Rockwell Bladerunner, but 2" thick was just a hair too much to slide under the control arm, so no luck there, either. If I were using thinner stock, I think either would have worked beau...

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    I was able to get four 2'x8'x2" sheets of Dow XPS very cheap. I have butterfly scarfed a 12' sheet and ready to draw out my pattern. Just wondering if 24" beam is enough? If wider, should I do two halves (14" at the widest) with a joint down the center line to get a 28" beam or add two inches on each side at the widest part of the bottom? FYI, I tried cutting the first cut (8 feet down to four feet) with a jigsaw using a Bosch soft materials blade. Clean cut with no dust, but I was unable to keep the blade from bending and thus cutting straight. I then tried the same blade in a Rockwell Bladerunner, but 2" thick was just a hair too much to slide under the control arm, so no luck there, either. If I were using thinner stock, I think either would have worked beautifully.

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  •  Sawfish, an unsinkable, lightweight, foam kayak (23 lbs). Free DIY kayak plans, the hardware store boat

    The local Home Depot has Owens-Corning 4x8 sheets of Foamular in various thicknesses of 1/2", 3/4", 1", 1 1/2" and 2". The 2" thick sheets are identified as "150" or "250". Apparently, 250 has greater impact resistance and is recommended for underneath poured concrete. There is only one dollar difference in price. Is 250 a better choice for this project? On another thought, is there any strength or formability advantage to using thinner sheets laminated together? One could even put a layer of fabric between sheets. Is a one inch sheet stressed into a curve stronger than a 2 inch sheet scarfed into a curve.

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