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  • TOUCAN - TOtally Useless Companion Anyone (should) Need

    I'm sorry, I just don't have time to be loading photographs onto here, I wouldn't know where I would begin anyhow.I am a bit old school, ("a bit" being an understatement!) My wife bought me this tablet, and I am just about able to message people. But, as you can see....4 months late. I don't hold out hope for my technological advances :-)

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  • taibhsegaeilge commented on arkray's instructable Knife Making 101 (reductive Process)12 months ago
    Knife Making 101 (reductive Process)

    4 months later, but better late than never. I am still making blades daily, and in answer to the quench. I always keep my quench at just above 70°c, it's not hard to do. Some people heat with a metal rod, they bang it in the forge and swirl it in the quenching oil till it gets to temp, few degrees above is okay. I use a large but old crock pot, I retro fitted it with a kiln pid. It works great. I don't have any troubles with it.maybe I would do an instructable.....but it's so easy a child could do it.No cold spots in the steel.anyway, what you are talking about is "shut out" but that has nothing to do with quench. Look it up.

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  • taibhsegaeilge commented on marcellahella's instructable SALT AND WATER ETCHING1 year ago
    SALT AND WATER ETCHING

    This is a terrible way of etching, their is a much more user friendly way of doing this and it doesn't require you to submerge the part. This is like a child's experiment gone super bad!check out YouTube for salt water etching, this is stupid beyond all reason!

    I really hope you didn't!There are far superior methods, "wilde one" in the comments uses the correct/best method.

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  • Knife Making 101 (reductive Process)

    Hmmm, I have to mention one thing. The part you mention about pushing the hot blade backwards and forwards, and not side to side....not true, it has to do with the temperature of the quench and the correct quenching medium for the particular steel more than anything else. Shocking the steel in a cold quench is more likely to cause warping. Even if everything is done correctly it can still warp, so when quenched the blade needs to remain hot so as to allow correction of the warping.

    Hi there,I personally use a kiln, and use a very accurately heat controlled oil bath. Using these two items takes out any guess work.If a blade does warp, which it does on occasion, it's easy to fix because of the correct quenching temperature still leaves the blade hot and slightly malleable, easy to sort out before tempering.Agreed, it could feasible happen if you are new to tool and knife making. But, let us be honest. If you are using good steel, it doesn't come cheap, if you are not going to pay 100% attention to the steel throughout the whole process, why would you be making knives to make such a critical error? Seems foolishto me. Best of wishes making 😉

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  • taibhsegaeilge followed ChrisK3931 year ago
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  • TOUCAN - TOtally Useless Companion Anyone (should) Need

    I had a similar idea for this. But instead, how about using the same mechanism that is commonly used on a mountain/race bike. A latch for quick release. Very easy to make, and could be make to a suitable size for the bladed mechanism.Or, a spring loaded detent pin? Very cheap and effective, I have used spring loaded detent pins on knives I have made myself. Not as big as this tool, but they are rated to have exceptional shear tolerance. Super strong and good for high precision.Just a thought 😊

    I had a similar idea for this. But instead, how about using the same mechanism that is commonly used on a mountain/race bike. A latch for quick release. Very easy to make, and could be make to a suitable size for the bladed mechanism.Or, a spring loaded detent pin? Very cheap and effective, I have used spring loaded detent pins on knives I have made myself. Not as big as this tool, but they are rated to have exceptional shear tolerance. Super strong and good for high precision.Just a thought 😊

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  • TOUCAN - TOtally Useless Companion Anyone (should) Need

    Best of luck with your project. It does look pretty cool, I have to admit.I too make my own knives. I have recently been working on more complex internal components to the mechanisms. I'm hoping to design something new, i hAve sone ideals, none of them practical, eg tiny hydraulic components.......but yeeeeah, not as easy as I first anticipated 😂Eeeee well, we try.....and try ☺

    I wish you all the best with your project. I too make knives, it's an enjoyable hobby. I am personally working on new mechanisms for working steampunk style blades with working pneumatics and possibly hydraulic movements. Best wishes,Pete

    Probably better off going with the fiberglass type handle used in most good modern day hammers. Relieves stress and shock when making hard strikes. It would make it a lot more of a comfortable tool to use, and is more sturdy as a hand tool material. Also it is has great machinability for a fantastic finish. I have used it myself in projects.If nothing else, the aluminium really needs some sort of coating to make it a practical tool to use in all conditions. Aluminium draws heat away from the body very quickly, not a great choice for gripping.Just my opinion, no offence intended.

    Best of luck with your project. It does look pretty cool, I have to admit.I too make my own knives. I have recently been working on more complex internal components to the mechanisms. I'm hoping to design something new, i have some ideas, none of them practical, eg tiny hydraulic components.......but yeeeeah, not as easy as I first anticipated 😂Eeeee well, we try.....and try ☺

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  • taibhsegaeilge commented on makingcustomknives's instructable Heat Treating Knives1 year ago
    Heat Treating Knives

    It can be hardened, but in practical terms only for the first few mms. You will need to employ an old technique called case hardening. It is impractical because it is expensive. The case hardening material is actually very easy to make. You can but it but it stupidly expensive. It gets expensive because you need to weld a case, put the part in it with the hardening powder, then heat it extensively in a kiln which is expensive on the electricity supply. Anyway once you have soaked it in the kiln at temp for many hours, leave it overnight, crack it open and you will have a case hardened Piece of steel.

    okay, after reading this, there are some guides I can add. I am from the UK, so 40°c is the temperature I was taught as a journeyman Smith. For oil quenching steels. When quenching in water cool but never cold was always the rule of thumb. And as for warping of the blades. I know it does happen, it has happened to me on occasion but it is VERY easy to fix, sometimes it is unavoidable. I have found it happens more with laminated steels and the twisted damascus types.Perhaps this is due to one side always being under more tension than the other due to the twist? Just a theory.Anyway, I digress....but if there is one piece of advice I can offer, if you want to make lots of blades, make yourself a belt grinder/sander. I did, and it saved me many many hours/days/weeks of endless filing. ...

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    okay, after reading this, there are some guides I can add. I am from the UK, so 40°c is the temperature I was taught as a journeyman Smith. For oil quenching steels. When quenching in water cool but never cold was always the rule of thumb. And as for warping of the blades. I know it does happen, it has happened to me on occasion but it is VERY easy to fix, sometimes it is unavoidable. I have found it happens more with laminated steels and the twisted damascus types.Perhaps this is due to one side always being under more tension than the other due to the twist? Just a theory.Anyway, I digress....but if there is one piece of advice I can offer, if you want to make lots of blades, make yourself a belt grinder/sander. I did, and it saved me many many hours/days/weeks of endless filing. Just go ahead, make a couple of decent knives, and don't hold back on the finish and you will be begging for a belt sander.....trust me.

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