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  • I bought a Cuisinart Belgian Waffle Maker at a Burlington Coat Factory store for $19.99. It was in a plain tan box with the Cuisinart name on it and a refurbished tag. Got it home and opened it, and it looked unused and has worked perfectly for five years!

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  • Here in "Tornado Alley" you see newer houses demolished by tornadoes while the houses that were built fifty plus years ago survive at a much higher rate. The older houses were built to higher standards. You see a lot of them that were built with 2x6 roof and ceiling trusses and 2x6 wall studs instead of the cheap white pine 2x4's used today. Pine was seldom used in the construction of these older homes.

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  • I wouldn't call a change from Alpine to Pioneer an "upgrade" even if the Alpine was old.

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  • The stainless steel was very high grade as it was used for the transport of fluorine gas in the production of hydrofluoric acid. Hydrofluoric acid is used in the oil refining process and production of isobutane as well in the production of refrigerants and Teflon. As far as "acid proof" steel there is no such thing. There are processes used on various grades of steel to reduce the effects of acid on them (such as "pickling"). However, in the end corrosion will still occur. Hycdrofluoric acid is one of the "pickling" agents that is used in the process. I'm not sure of the grade of stainless steel my two rings are made from. However, I do know that in the thirty-four years since I made both rings neither ring has shown any signs of corrosion or left any …

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    The stainless steel was very high grade as it was used for the transport of fluorine gas in the production of hydrofluoric acid. Hydrofluoric acid is used in the oil refining process and production of isobutane as well in the production of refrigerants and Teflon. As far as "acid proof" steel there is no such thing. There are processes used on various grades of steel to reduce the effects of acid on them (such as "pickling"). However, in the end corrosion will still occur. Hycdrofluoric acid is one of the "pickling" agents that is used in the process. I'm not sure of the grade of stainless steel my two rings are made from. However, I do know that in the thirty-four years since I made both rings neither ring has shown any signs of corrosion or left any stains on my fingers. This would seem to indicate a higher grade of stainless steel than used for most consumer products. They do oxide and lose their shine, but a couple of minutes on a buffing wheel with a stainless steel appropriate polish, and they look as good as the day I first polished them.

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  • You can also get stainless steel, uh hum, nuts! They are cheaper than titanium and may also be a lot easier to find in sizes to fit man sized fingers. I still have one of two I made while doing refinery construction in the early 1980's. The nut was intended for a stainless bolt on a stainless steel flange on stainless steel piping. I'm not sure what the stainless steel piping was used for, but it had to be expensive.

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  • That's the best idea I've heard to locate light fixture boxes, vent registers, etc. I'll have to remember that.

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  • The addition of cutting/tap oil would help immensely in drilling through the pipe.

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  • Crystal clear polyurethane is not UV stable. If place in sunlight, it will discolor and eventually flake. Also, the polished aluminum piece will have to be cleaned very well prior to top coating as the buffing compounds leave behind a waxy layer that help prevent oxidation. I've done my share of aluminum polishing. It can be time consuming and frustrating especially working on a one horse buffer with a large buffing wheel. It's no fun when you have a prop spinner yanked out of your hand and then have to push out a crease in the tip of it.

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  • throwedoff commented on randofo's instructable $2 Bill Pad

    Who even remembers phone numbers? If it's not in our contacts list on our cell phones, 99.9% of you people could rattle off a phone number other than your own. There's some that don't even know their own number.

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