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  • I suspect that it isn't the coffee grounds burning that makes this work, but rather that the grounds are providing wicking and surface area to give the wax a place to liquify, vaporize and burn with the heat just like any candle wax.Dryer lint is a good firestarter by itself, because, generally, the fibers are very thin, so the surrounding oxygen from the air can get to lots of surface area.If you look up the chemical structure of fibers, you'll find a predominance of hydrocarbons in long chains: paraffin is also. So these firestarters are much like my wife's grandparents used, mostly made of papertowel rolls or toilet paper rolls cut short (about 1") and soaked in melted parafin until they start to swell. This makes a good use for grounds, which, if well dried, help to fill the egg …

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    I suspect that it isn't the coffee grounds burning that makes this work, but rather that the grounds are providing wicking and surface area to give the wax a place to liquify, vaporize and burn with the heat just like any candle wax.Dryer lint is a good firestarter by itself, because, generally, the fibers are very thin, so the surrounding oxygen from the air can get to lots of surface area.If you look up the chemical structure of fibers, you'll find a predominance of hydrocarbons in long chains: paraffin is also. So these firestarters are much like my wife's grandparents used, mostly made of papertowel rolls or toilet paper rolls cut short (about 1") and soaked in melted parafin until they start to swell. This makes a good use for grounds, which, if well dried, help to fill the egg crate cups and provide storage of lots of paraffin and great wicking to get it all to the flame. I wonder, have you tried this with just the egg carton material?

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  • You're welcome. I really hadn't intended that mentioning the study would be an insult to anyone or accusation of oversight.With regard to opacity of milk cartons, the study does indicate that even light-block plastic cartons allow a significant amount of near-UV light (and 460 is right on the edge) to pass. It is amazing how many variations on "with lights that go off when the door closes" there are. Thank you for making yours civil!

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  • One thing I would like to mention here:Recent research from Cornell, reported in the Journal of Dairy Science, indicates that four hours under white LED lighting with significant blue-LED wavelength light can change the taste of milk, and not for the better. You can read the paper at http://www.journalofdairyscience.org/article/S0022...They surveyed milk-case lighting and decided to use 3500K LED lighting (used most often in store milk case lighting) and identify the primary blue drive wavelength as 460nm. (White-light LEDs often use a blue or ultraviolet LED to drive a phosphor mix which produces the widened, smooth spectrum we associate with the sun and incandescents. White-Light LEDs tend to start from blue LEDs. When you look at a striplight with LEDs, they appear yellow or orangish: …

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    One thing I would like to mention here:Recent research from Cornell, reported in the Journal of Dairy Science, indicates that four hours under white LED lighting with significant blue-LED wavelength light can change the taste of milk, and not for the better. You can read the paper at http://www.journalofdairyscience.org/article/S0022...They surveyed milk-case lighting and decided to use 3500K LED lighting (used most often in store milk case lighting) and identify the primary blue drive wavelength as 460nm. (White-light LEDs often use a blue or ultraviolet LED to drive a phosphor mix which produces the widened, smooth spectrum we associate with the sun and incandescents. White-Light LEDs tend to start from blue LEDs. When you look at a striplight with LEDs, they appear yellow or orangish: this is the phosphor coating. The LED light comes from a very small point on the LED die buried under the phosphor coating. When the blue LED is on, the phosphor coating absorbs the 460nm light and re-emits a smooth spectrum of white light, but with a residual peak at 460nm of blue light that has not been absorbed. 460nm is very close to the 450nm wavelength absorption peak of riboflavin, which is identified as one of the photo-sensitive components of milk. (The list included chlorophyll and porphyrin, and alludes to others). These photo-sensitive components absorb energy from the blue light and pass it on to cause further reactions which create free-radicals, singlet oxygen, and affect neighboring molecules to produce, among others, "unwanted aromatic compounds" which can have profound effects of the taste of the milk. "Ancillary" effects can also include reduction of nutritional components of the milk, but they are not addressed by this study.)The bottom line of the study is that milk near expiration date that has been light-blocked and properly refrigerated is often perceived to taste better than milk which is fresh and has had 4 hours or more of exposure to LED white lighting in the case.So it may be good to reserve a portion of your refrigerator for milk, and use foamboard or other light-blocking materials to isolate them from interior fridge lighting.By the way, the study noted that even "lightblock" bottles didn't block the blue light.

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