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  • wfidrock commented on TheDIYPlan's instructable PVC Fence5 weeks ago
    PVC Fence

    So, I looked at your finished picture again. I guess you just are holding these 'fence' pieces in place by the side trim on the posts and the picket bottoms are just sitting on the deck?So an option would be to still have the pickets come through both sides of the bottom rail (and still have the stop screws) BUT only have one hole on the top rail (bottom side), giving you a smooth railing top and no 'protruding' picket tops requiring caps.Just throwing out alternative design ideas for folks... :)

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  • wfidrock commented on TheDIYPlan's instructable PVC Fence5 weeks ago
    PVC Fence

    Since you were doing this between posts on a patio it was more of a 'railing' than a 'fence', so I would suggest, if there were a next time or for others contemplating something similar, the following:Don't drill the holes in the 3" top and bottom pipe rails through BOTH sides, just through ONE side of each rail (the bottom of the top rail, and the top of the bottom rail). Now cut your vertical pickets approximately 6" to 7" shorter (about 25" to 26" long) - your pickets will be inserted into the holes in the bottom rail and then the top rail mounts on the top side of the picket by inserting the top of the picket into the hole in the bottom side of the top rail.In other words the pickets stick into the holes in the rails and push up against the far side of the ...

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    Since you were doing this between posts on a patio it was more of a 'railing' than a 'fence', so I would suggest, if there were a next time or for others contemplating something similar, the following:Don't drill the holes in the 3" top and bottom pipe rails through BOTH sides, just through ONE side of each rail (the bottom of the top rail, and the top of the bottom rail). Now cut your vertical pickets approximately 6" to 7" shorter (about 25" to 26" long) - your pickets will be inserted into the holes in the bottom rail and then the top rail mounts on the top side of the picket by inserting the top of the picket into the hole in the bottom side of the top rail.In other words the pickets stick into the holes in the rails and push up against the far side of the tube. You now have a smooth top rail like you would expect on a porch railing and you save money by not buying all those caps for the picket tubes.

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  • wfidrock commented on Sherlock5280's instructable Solar Eclipse Viewer2 years ago
    Solar Eclipse Viewer

    I second that! Definitely do NOT use #10 lens, use at least #12!!!!

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  • How to SAFELY View the Sun to See a Solar Eclipse and Search for Sunspots.

    And this (later, more up-to-date 2017) NASA page (the one you reference is adapted from a late 1990's page) is what I was referring to: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safetyscroll down to section "Additional Safety Information, Viewing with Protection":Viewing with Protection -- Experts suggests that one widely available filter for safe solar viewing is welders glass of sufficiently high number. The only ones that are safe for direct viewing of the Sun with your eyes are those of Shade 12 or higher. These are much darker than the filters used for most kinds of welding. If you have an old welder's helmet around the house and are thinking of using it to view the Sun, make sure you know the filter's shade number. If it's less than 12 (and it probably is), don't even think about us...

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    And this (later, more up-to-date 2017) NASA page (the one you reference is adapted from a late 1990's page) is what I was referring to: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safetyscroll down to section "Additional Safety Information, Viewing with Protection":Viewing with Protection -- Experts suggests that one widely available filter for safe solar viewing is welders glass of sufficiently high number. The only ones that are safe for direct viewing of the Sun with your eyes are those of Shade 12 or higher. These are much darker than the filters used for most kinds of welding. If you have an old welder's helmet around the house and are thinking of using it to view the Sun, make sure you know the filter's shade number. If it's less than 12 (and it probably is), don't even think about using it to look at the Sun. Many people find the Sun too bright even in a Shade 12 filter, and some find the Sun too dim in a Shade 14 filter — but Shade 13 filters are uncommon and can be hard to find. The AAS Reputable Vendors of Solar Filters & Viewers page (link is external) doesn't list any suppliers of welder's filters, only suppliers of special-purpose filters made for viewing the Sun.To find out more about eyewear and handheld viewers go to https://eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety/eyewear-viewers (link is external).

    Actually NASA recommends #12 or higher, saying #13 is best (but harder to find) and #14 is a little too dark, but usable.I purchased replacement lenses (should arrive tomorrow's mail) from an online welding supply company, Shade #13 lenses, 2" by 4.25" and will use them to make a cardboard viewer (think bottom of a cereal box, cut to fit snugly around eyes and nose, lens at the end sealed with duct tape).The replacement lenses only cost about $3 each (I bought 5) including shipping and handling and after this years eclipse I will dismantle my viewers and store the glass lenses for the eclipse on April 8th, 2024 (which will be a total eclipse for me in Austin, TX)!

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  • wfidrock's instructable BOSEBuild Wireless and USB Phone Charger's weekly stats: 2 years ago
    • BOSEBuild Wireless and USB Phone Charger
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  • wfidrock's instructable BOSEBuild Wireless and USB Phone Charger's weekly stats: 2 years ago
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  • wfidrock commented on JP'sW's instructable Transfer Photograph onto Wood2 years ago
    Transfer Photograph onto Wood

    As I said at the very beginning of my comment "Never tried it, but..."Just an idea I had while reading all the comments, I have never done this.With t-shirt transfer paper you are printing onto a layer / coating on the paper. The heat of your iron causes that layer to kind of melt off the paper onto the shirt (or something akin to that). I imagine it 'might' work on wood, maybe if the surface of the wood was NOT really smooth, maybe a little rough (i.e. like the texture of a t-shirt) so that the surface of the wood was a little porous, like the cloth of the t-shirt.If you have any left over t-shirt transfer paper and some wood, give it a try and let us know!

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  • wfidrock commented on JP'sW's instructable Transfer Photograph onto Wood2 years ago
    Transfer Photograph onto Wood

    Never tried it, but for those with only an inkjet printer (no laser printer) how about using a T-shirt Transfer Sheet?(i.e. the sheets made for inkjet printer that you use an iron to transfer the printed image onto a t-shirt)Print the reversed image on the T-shirt Transfer Sheet, place sheet on the bare, dry wood (instead of t-shirt) and then transfer the image with an iron.After image has been ironed onto the wood and cooled then cover with mod-podge or varnish - would have to test what would be safe for image and not dissolve the transferred ink...

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  • How to Perfectly Apply a Screen Protector

    A good place to apply a screen protector is in the bathroom, after you (or someone) has taken a hot shower - or just run the shower on hot for a little while, with fan off and door(s) closed.The high humidity helps to eliminate the dust particles in the air (the dust particles attract moisture and get heavier, sinking towards the ground).Also, I would suggest one more piece of tape, in the middle of the side opposite the two pieces, acting as a 'tab' that you can use in step 5 to 'flip' the protector over onto the device while pulling slightly to keep the 'hinge' pieces of tape taut.

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  • Open Source Garage Door Controller / Monitor

    In your step 3 you mention getting around 'newer' garage door openers (GDO) that don't respond to a contact closure (i.e. the relay connecting the two terminals).Another way (that I used on a similar project) was to buy an inexpensive car RF remote and open it up and solder the two wires to the points where the physical button switch was. Now the project 'presses' the button of the remote transmitter and sends a wireless signal to the GDO.Another advantage of using a car remote is that most are three channel so a single remote can control up to three doors. I left my remote powered by its 3V coin cell battery but it could also be made to be powered by a 3V supply (or 5V regulated down to 3V or whatever voltage your remote uses).I would combine this remote and an NPN transistor (instea...

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    In your step 3 you mention getting around 'newer' garage door openers (GDO) that don't respond to a contact closure (i.e. the relay connecting the two terminals).Another way (that I used on a similar project) was to buy an inexpensive car RF remote and open it up and solder the two wires to the points where the physical button switch was. Now the project 'presses' the button of the remote transmitter and sends a wireless signal to the GDO.Another advantage of using a car remote is that most are three channel so a single remote can control up to three doors. I left my remote powered by its 3V coin cell battery but it could also be made to be powered by a 3V supply (or 5V regulated down to 3V or whatever voltage your remote uses).I would combine this remote and an NPN transistor (instead of Relays, as suggested by braytonlarson) to eliminate the relay board.In my project I also considered (haven't actually done this yet) using a microcontroller, a bluetooth module (or other low power, low cost RF module) and a tilt switch as a door sensor. Using a bluetooth module with built-in microcontroller would work well.The idea is to make a battery powered 'tilt module' that would by attached (double sided tape) to the upper panel of a multi-panel garage door. As the door opens the tilt switch is activated (opens or closes depending on physical setup) and that information can be sent via bluetooth (or other RF communication). Likewise as the door closes the tilt switch changes back to the other state. If more info is desired another 'tilt module' could also be placed on the bottom door panel - this would allow sensing of 3 states; door fully closed, door opening/closing, door fully open.

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  • wfidrock commented on ThomasJ1's instructable Wireless All Sky Camera3 years ago
    Wireless All Sky Camera

    I assume that is your house in the videos, have you considered mounting the camera up on the roof (on an antenna or vent pipe) or at least on the side up near the roof peak? I would think you would get a better view without the house and less trees around the edges.Or is this something that you have planned now that everything is working nicely?A really ambitious mount would be to have a motorized extending mount; telescoping pipe sections so that camera is down near roof during the day (for neighborhood aesthetics or regulations) but rises up higher at night to get a clear 360 view. Could be made to not raise as high when windy, etc.Also, for weather bugs this camera (with different exposure settings, etc.) could have daytime duty looking at weather conditions (sunny, cloudy, rain, sn...

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    I assume that is your house in the videos, have you considered mounting the camera up on the roof (on an antenna or vent pipe) or at least on the side up near the roof peak? I would think you would get a better view without the house and less trees around the edges.Or is this something that you have planned now that everything is working nicely?A really ambitious mount would be to have a motorized extending mount; telescoping pipe sections so that camera is down near roof during the day (for neighborhood aesthetics or regulations) but rises up higher at night to get a clear 360 view. Could be made to not raise as high when windy, etc.Also, for weather bugs this camera (with different exposure settings, etc.) could have daytime duty looking at weather conditions (sunny, cloudy, rain, snow, etc.) and someone with video image processing knowledge might even be able to automate analysis of an image to determine weather conditions.Great project!Also like your other projects on your site, especially the wooden clock!!

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  • How to Unlock Your Car in 30 Seconds

    Interesting (not really) and yes I got 'sucked in' by the misleading picture like others :)Go ahead and try this on 'newer' BMW's (with what they call 'central locking').As an example it would not work on a Z3 convertible (with central locking) as there is NO way to unlock without either key or remote. This car has no lock/unlock power button. When in the car you can lock via the 'knob' on the top edge of door, BUT you cannot unlock with this knob as its top sits flush with the door when locked. You unlock the door from inside by pulling the door handle twice; once to unlock, second time opens the door.But if you get out of the car and lock the doors with the key cylinder and/or the remote then the door cannot be opened using the inside door handle (hance the name 'central locking')....

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    Interesting (not really) and yes I got 'sucked in' by the misleading picture like others :)Go ahead and try this on 'newer' BMW's (with what they call 'central locking').As an example it would not work on a Z3 convertible (with central locking) as there is NO way to unlock without either key or remote. This car has no lock/unlock power button. When in the car you can lock via the 'knob' on the top edge of door, BUT you cannot unlock with this knob as its top sits flush with the door when locked. You unlock the door from inside by pulling the door handle twice; once to unlock, second time opens the door.But if you get out of the car and lock the doors with the key cylinder and/or the remote then the door cannot be opened using the inside door handle (hance the name 'central locking'). And, yes, you can lock someone inside a BMW Z3 such that cannot get out (short of using a knife on the roof if it is a convertible)! Not sure about other BMW models....

    Interesting (not really) and yes I got 'sucked in' by the misleading picture like others :)Go ahead and try this on 'newer' BMW's (with what they call 'central locking').As an example it would not work on a Z3 convertible (with central locking) as there is NO way to unlock without either key or remote. This car has no lock/unlock power button. When in the car you can lock via the 'knob' on the top edge of door, BUT you cannot unlock with this knob as its top sits flush with the door when locked. You unlock the door from inside by pulling the door handle twice; once to unlock, second time opens the door.But if you get out of the car and lock the doors with the key cylinder and/or the remote then the door cannot be opened using the inside door handle (hence the name 'central locking')....

    see more »

    Interesting (not really) and yes I got 'sucked in' by the misleading picture like others :)Go ahead and try this on 'newer' BMW's (with what they call 'central locking').As an example it would not work on a Z3 convertible (with central locking) as there is NO way to unlock without either key or remote. This car has no lock/unlock power button. When in the car you can lock via the 'knob' on the top edge of door, BUT you cannot unlock with this knob as its top sits flush with the door when locked. You unlock the door from inside by pulling the door handle twice; once to unlock, second time opens the door.But if you get out of the car and lock the doors with the key cylinder and/or the remote then the door cannot be opened using the inside door handle (hence the name 'central locking'). And, yes, you can lock someone inside a BMW Z3 such that they cannot get out (short of using a knife on the roof if it is a convertible)! Not sure about other BMW models....

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