Can't access PDF?

Unable to dlowload a PDF for "Brick Barbecue". I have tried this a number of ways -- "left click, right click and save, print PDF, etc.” -- and all have failed.?

Question by ftcastle   |  last reply


How do I edit my, How to Tango .pdf document

Https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Tango/

Question by blong206b   |  last reply


Does anyone else have trouble printing out Instructable pdfs?

I have just signed up to Instructables.  I have downloaded a PDF and can see it on my screen but when I try to print it, the printer status is érror'.  My computer says my printer is working fine.  Its also blocked up my printer, this document has got in the queue and I can't get it out!I have a hp with Windows 7.  Looking forward to being able to print out the fire pit instructions if anyone can help me.

Question by adelasivewright   |  last reply


how can i download the project in pdf form?while I isn't have any visa account or other type of account????

I isn't have any type of account ,,,can i free download It????

Question by samiulhaq   |  last reply


Does anyone have a PDF on making a motorized scooter that has 3 decent sized wheels, not those dumb skateboard wheels?

I'm rather large and I figure that multiple wheels and a larger diameter would spread the weight distribution better.? I'm also on an extremely tight budget (read, I need to be able to scrounge materials for free), and have limited tools.

Question by javajunkie1976 



How to purify water with iodine?

I found this site while searching for an answer to my question.  I read the instructions; I then asked for the PDF copy for future reference.  I was asked to sign in, along with other questions.  I requested the free membership for now, since I do not know this site.  I was then told that I could not have the PDF without paying for membership.  Respectfully, I feel that it would be much better to state any rules/requirements before asking for personal information.  If you do not wish to share a PDF, that is fine; just make it clear. Perhaps this is a wonderful, informative site; I may never know.  Right now, I am a bit disappointed with my experience here.     

Question by sanz327   |  last reply



Build your own Lego Skull

Waaay back in 2008, Noah Scalin published a Lego skull on his popular Skull-A-Day blog. A reader of the blog has now put together a really nice set of instructions to build you own, in a stylish PDF document. So, go, download the instructions, build your own skull, and post a picture on Skull-A-Day.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Scientists say: Hit Them Hard!

It had to happen.Scientists from the University of Ottowa have modelled the effects of a classical zombie plague, as part of a model in epidemiology.They looked at what would happen if uninfected humans attempted to cure or quarantine zombies, and the effects of retaliation:We show that only quick, aggressive attacks can stave off the doomsday scenario: the collapse of society as zombies overtake us all.It looks like we might have a need for all those zombie Instructables after all!PDF of the paper, via BBC story.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


UFO conspiracy, anybody?

Brace yourself for a flood of new or revitalised conspiracy theories on the internet - the British government has "lost" files relating to a significant UK UFO flap, the Rendlesham Incident. The incident has been pretty thoroughly debunked, starting with the huge holes and inconsistencies in the "witness" stories, and on through a quite convincing explanation of the actual light seen. Of course, the biggest piece of evidence for a conspiracy is a lack of evidence for the conspiracy - of course the story is real, otherwise They wouldn't have hidden all the evidence... Now, with some of the files "lost", the loons are going to be back all over the story. But, if you want to see the actual evidence that is currently available for free, you have a couple of weeks left to download the PDFs.  Enjoy.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Nonleathalbychoice style weapons/"props"

Hello to anyone who follows me. Yes I am still alive. Now the reason I am posting this is because I feel like I need to give back to the community I have been using/involved with for years now. Not the craft community but the Knex community here. Many of them have moved on from Knex since starting college and so have I. Mostly do to the lack of space and already messy room. So in order to give back I have come up with a better more interesting method. Instead of using Oblivitus's method of making the Knex guns in a CAD program I will instead be giving you the plans and basic instructions to make weapons/props inspired by Nonleathalbychoice.  This being said unlike the Knex guns these items are going to be less accessible, more difficult, and dangerous. To do these things it will help to have a computer with Solidworks 2014 on it. Later I will post PDFs of the cutting plans in order to reach a wider audience. That being said  some of the projects were  and will be inspired by scrap metal I found and will be costly and wasteful to replicate. However I believe that the raw materials for 4 of the projects came in at under $100 total. So still cheaper than many of the larger Knex guns. Also I probably wont be posting these things as step by step instructions since most of these items are made by just cutting out sheet/bar metal. Any advanced instructions will be noted. The time frame for these instructions is going to be very slow due to college. Expect maybe 1  a month if even that.  I will try to inform you of changes and fixes as soon as they become apparent to me.  Also I am first writing this after only an hour of sleep. So if any of you spot grammatical errors please point them out to me.

Topic by tytiger33 


can you help identify kite parts

I wondered if anyone could help me identify some kite parts.  I won a huge lot at the local auctions including literally thousands of kite making parts. (I have a lot more not imaged here) Unfortunately, I have little experience with kites and the scale of the volume I have acquired is a little daunting. So I thought I would ask the experts for help :) So far I think I have managed to identify the following: 22,000 4mm end caps 6,000 3mm spar/eap 1500 i think small douge (the yellow things that look a bit like bullet casings .. they could also be end caps but i am completely without a clue on this one) 500 rubber bands 6,000 5mm end caps 3,000 6mm end caps 8,000 3mm rubber gromets Tones of name tags I know there are a number of notched end caps I think the curved bits of plastic were 3 rods can attached are called dihedrals. 65 kites The fabric parts of around 10 large kites made by greens of Burnley (a lot of them branded as the pioneer range) I haven't measured but im guessing around 9ft across I think the lot originally came from Greens of Burnley who are no longer trading but I have found their archived site https://web.archive.org/web/20060818054031/http://www.greenskites.com/spares.asp If you could help by identifying some of the parts/ what the pioneer range of kites is possibly a place where I can sell some of the kit (there's far to much for me to work with here) I would be relly grateful :) PS ill put up more photo's if anyone is interested.  PPS I have just found some info on the Greens of Burnley kites http://www.ebay.ie/itm/Vintage-CODY-War-Kite-1-GREENS-KITES-Greens-of-Burnley-Large-Frame-Box-/401079737121 PPPS I found the original image I think I have a few boxers from the range. http://www.kitelife.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Kite-Lines-v7-3.pdf

Topic by world of woodcraft   |  last reply


Born to Run the Oakland Marathon

On Sunday, I ran the Oakland Marathon, finishing in 3:54:29, and placing 215th out of 945 runners.  I know it's cliche, but I read Born to Run and got inspired me to run a marathon.  It's the best book I've read in years:  the characters (all real people!) are fascinating, the setting and story are fantastic, and it just made me want to get out and go.  Halfway through the book, I decided to run a few miles to the grocery store in the rain just to run out back, not because I needed anything. Prior to reading Born to Run, I had been running a 2-3 miles twice a week to vary my preferred morning exercise routine of biking or swimming (the kitesurfing season hasn't really started yet).  Running was something I did if I couldn't get to a pool or didn't have the time for a long enough bike ride; it was exercise I did while traveling and when there were no better options.  Born to Run made me question that assumption, and I decided to see how longer runs would feel. Over a year ago I read "You Walk Wrong", a New York Magazine article on going barefoot.  It convinced me that I should be able to go unshod, or at least with minimally foot coverings.  Why would 30 years of running shoe development be able to produce better results than millions of years of foot evolution?  So I bought some Vibram Five Fingers  to protect my delicate soles, and had been doing lots of hiking and a bit of running.  The difference between running in running shoes and Vibram Five Fingers was profound for me.  In running shoes, I typically stopped running because my knees and hips hurt, not because I was exhausted.  The Vibrams forced me to take smaller, faster strides without heel strikes, and suddenly I was getting closer and closer to being able to run long enough to catch exhaustion without any joint pain.  The concept of going barefoot was initially tough because of my flat feet and overpronation, and the possibility of re-dislocating a kneecap. I never went anywhere barefoot, and after I initially dislocated my kneecap in 2000, I was told by a sports medicine doctor that I should never walk without the aid of custom orthotics in my shoes.  However, barefoot websites and forums are full of stories about people's arches coming back, and how kids raised without shoes never have flat feet.  Amazingly, it's all worked perfectly for me.  I now run without my orthotics without any knee pain, and my arches appear to have (re?)formed.  After hopping out of the pool, I always inspect my wet footprints, and they now have distinct arches.  I wish I had taken photographs every day to plot progress. With the characters and race in Born to Run still fresh in my mind, I looked for nearby races to give myself some motivation and something to train for.  When I discovered that Oakland was holding its first marathon in 25 years, and that the route literally went through my neighborhood, I immediately signed up for the half-marathon and convinced Christy to do the same.  I researched training regiments online, and discovered many were 4 and 5 month plans; since I had 50 days before the race, I decided simply to run longer and longer distances at a comfortable pace, and not worry about a rigid structure.  I ran most of my miles on trails in the Oakland hills, and some on the streets, but all of them in my Vibrams.  During a practice run on the half-marathon course three weeks before the race, I completed the half in less than my target time for two hours and felt so good that I opted to do the full marathon. In the marathon, I ran with GEICO-sponsored pacers aiming for a 3:50:00 time (8:46 miles on the flats, and slower miles in the hills; course elevation PDF here).  Of the three pacers, one was running his 34th marathon, and the other two were ultra-marathoners training for a 200 mile race from Calistoga to Santa Cruz; their normal weekend run was 50 miles, so a marathon was like taking a break.  Running in a group is awesome and way better than running by myself listening to audio books.  On multiple occasions, I imagined that we were the hunters of a tribe out running down game -- water stations every couple of miles broke the illusion, but I still eagerly grabbed cups, and the community support was tremendous.  There were bands, drummers, DJs, and gospel choirs making music along the route; families with full brunch buffets setup in their front yards offering all the runners fresh fruit and homemade baked goods; and many people just thanking us for running in Oakland.  The second image shows all my runs in the 50 days leading up to the marathon.  The first 5-mile run on the chart was the longest I had ever run at that point.  While I was coming from something of a limited endurance background (I've biked 135 miles on a tandem from Boston to Provincetown in a single day), I didn't really know my limit.  At mile 23 of the marathon, I finally caught up to exhaustion, and fell behind the pace group.  The last three miles were painful, but in the last quarter mile, I couldn't stop grinning and felt like I might laugh and cry at the same time.  When it was over, I just wanted to sit down. I was aiming for a sub-4-hour marathon, and I'm really proud to have done that on my first try.  Everyone made fun of me for walking like a zombie the next day at work, and I have some pretty large blood blisters on my feet, but nothing that won't disappear in under a week.  Go and read Born to Run, it might inspire you, too. Christy says: I'd always had to run as cross-training for other sports (I swam competitively for 13 years) and ran when I needed quick exercise, but hated it - my joints hurt, and it just wasn't fun.  I was a distance swimmer and can hike nearly forever, but could literally swim farther than I could (or would) run.  The most I'd ever run before was about 4 miles.   I got my Vibrams with Eric, and really enjoyed hiking with them on my feet.  I hadn't run in nearly a year and a half (pregnancy loosens the joints, which made running feel even worse) so when Eric announced he was signing up to run 13 miles I was dubious.  However, I read Born to Run and was suitably inspired - I was in good cardio shape from swimming and stationary biking, and would happily hike 13 miles, so why couldn't I run that far?  I decided to go out for a 5k jog to see what running felt like in my Vibrams. Long story short, I accidentally ran 6 miles, stopping not due to fatigue or joint injury but because of a blister from a poorly-adjusted shoe strap.  I signed up for the half marathon that evening, and started taking increasingly pleasant runs through the parks and across the city.  I ran the half-marathon course with Corvidae in her jog stroller, stopping to feed her periodically.  Eric finished while I was on mile 8, so he backtracked along the course and met us at mile 10, by which time she was thoroughly done with this stroller nonsense and had migrated to the sling.  I left the two of them to their own devices and jogged the rest of the way to the finish, about 3:25 after I started in the morning.  Not terribly speedy, even given the breaks!  The next day the bottoms of my feet were sore, and one of my Achilles tendons was a bit inflamed - I'd describe it as having overused my springs - but even though I was limping, my muscles were still in good shape. My pace is still quite slow (I ran the half-marathon in 2:42, for roughly 12:26 mile splits) but it's frighteningly consistent - I negative split most of the race, and at the end discovered I still had plenty of energy to sprint past a dozen exhausted runners.  Clearly I didn't run fast enough or far enough, but I was specifically setting a pace I felt able to maintain indefinitely.  The weak link is still my feet!  While I had plenty of muscle and energy left at the end of the race, the bottoms of my feet were tired from use - more practice is necessary to balance out years of shoe-wearing.  However, I recovered much more quickly this time, and was able to run again by Tuesday morning.  No zombie shuffle for me!  Of course, this means next time I'll be running the marathon, and at a faster pace!

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply