Welcome to the Instructables Teachers Hub!

Welcome to the new home for all things Teacher related on Instructables. We hope you'll explore the new features and come back often to find and share projects, inspiration, and classroom resources. As you explore the new Teachers Hub, you'll see it's easy to find projects by subject or grade level and sort them to find all the best and freshest projects.Be sure to spend some time in the new Teacher Forum. It's a great place to connect with fellow teachers and make new friends! You could start by introducing yourself here or finding a topic that interests you and join the conversation there. :)We'll be working to continuously update and support your needs in this new area of the Instructables community, so thank you in advance for your valued feedback and suggestions.

Topic by WeTeachThemSTEM   |  last reply


What Instructables projects have been particularly useful in your classroom?

Have there been any specific instructables that were especially beneficial to you in your classroom?If so, please call them out and share a link below!What was the grade level and course of study, and how did you implement the project in your lesson?

Question by seamster 


Are you going to ISTE?

Anyone going to ISTE this year in Philadelphia? Is there anything you are excited to see or do there?Instructables will be at the Autodesk booth along with our friends from the Tinkercad and Fusion 360 teams. Come find us and say hello, and learn about some of our new teacher-friendly features. You can also decorate a tote bag and grab some cool swag!

Topic by randofo   |  last reply


Best Arduino lessons for different age groups?

I'm always looking to freshen up my curriculum when it comes to introductory Arduino lessons. Some older guides have mistakes that aren't ever corrected, and new features come out that I just don't notice (my students tease me for forgetting about the bulk comment/uncomment menu item, for example). Besides the Instructables Arduino Class and Tinkercad Circuits lessons, what are your best suggestions for introductory Arduino lessons at the grade level you teach?

Question by bekathwia 


Makey Makey Community Hub

We are stoked to be part of this new teacher community! Thank you, Instructables! We are going to have our own community hub soon, and are hoping you'll want to be a part of it! Do you have a Makey Makey guide that you've created for your classroom? We'd love to see it and share it on our hub! Share a link in this topic to show us what you've made.

Topic by MakeyMakey   |  last reply


Jurassic Spark kids game: how to distribute fun more evenly?

I recently made up an outdoor kids adventure game that is really fun for most, but could use help with making the game more fun for all the kids. I conducted an anonymous survey afterwards and a few kids were sad that they didn't get to find the batteries (explained below). My question relates to this. I'm asking here because I figure teachers have tons of experience with kids!The game is called Jurassic Spark. I've written up the details with lots of pictures in this Instructable for the game, but I'll summarize here:Target kid age: 4 to 7 years old (although I plan to continue adapting as kids get older) Scenario: The Jurassic Spark electrified fence has lost power and many dangerous dinosaurs are on the loose. Can our brave explorers (kids) find the high power batteries to energize the fence before it's too late? Watch out for the T-Rex!Player roles: explorers (kids), small dinosaurs (adults), and the terrifying T-Rex (adult)!To win: the explorers need to find and return the 6 high power Batteries back to the Power Station to energize the electric fence before the dinosaurs tag all the explorers. Because the kids are young, the dinosaurs (adults) aren't playing to win, just to make it an exciting challenge. The game lasts around 15 to 20 minutes.Getting tagged: When a dinosaur tags an explorer, the explorer has to freeze and put their arms out like in freeze tag. Frozen explorers are encouraged to yell for assistance "Help! Help! A dino chomped me!" and can be unfrozen by being touched by another free explorer.Tail stealing: The explorers are not completely defenseless, however. The small dinosaurs have tails that can be stolen and they hate that! "Roar! Who stole my tail!?" Tail lacking dinosaurs must return to the dinosaur pen before they can regrow their tail and return to hunting. I feel that this is a very important part of the game as it brings balance and a whole lot of fun. It also encourages lots of exciting team building as kids will often gang up on a dino to take it down or distract it. Once the electric fence is powered up, dinos that have their tails stolen are trapped in the pen until the game ends (usually only a minute or two).T-REX: To up the level of excitement, we add a T-Rex wild card into the mix! The T-Rex cannot be stopped and loves chomping on explorers! There's nothing quite like seeing a giant roaring T-Rex head chase or stalk their cute tiny prey :)We played the game with 20 kids, 6 small dinosaurs, and 1 T-Rex.Question: How can I make the game more fun for the kids that feel left out because they didn't find a battery? We made a rule that a kid can only return one battery per game, but there are 6 batteries and 20 kids. The older kids tended to find the batteries each game. My gut is telling me that I wouldn't be able to handle a game with 20 batteries.The part that makes this extra challenging is that the kids are young and I can't make too many complicated rules. We'll add complexity as they grow older with tranquilizer darts and stuff like that :)If you are interested in reading all the survey feedback, it is near the bottom of the Instructable.Thanks!Adam

Question by afraser-kruck   |  last reply