Air pump

Does anybody know how to make a air pump for an aquarium?? I need it for a Humidifier.

Posted by kris142 10 years ago


Air Jelly

I can not wait until they come out with air peanut butter.http://www.engadget.com/2008/04/28/festo-airjelly-flies-through-the-air-with-the-greatest-of-ease/

Posted by Tetranitrate 10 years ago


peltier device air con

Hey guys I am working on a project, my first, and am wondering if any one is willing to offer advice. the simple setup uses a swamp cooler to blow cold air over a radiator. the radiator cools down water that is connected to a peltier.if my theory is half accurate (which at best it is) I should be able to make the peltier quite a few degrees below the ambient temperature.

Posted by plucas1 4 years ago


Single Piston Air engine

Hi all, need help/ advice in designing a single piston air engine, It is part of a mechanical engineering course I am currently studying, the only parameters i was given are - Single cylinder with vertically displaced piston with rotation of the input shaft on a horizontal axis - free standing with an operating envelope of 300mm x 300mm x 300mm - accommodate a nominal piston diameter of 20mm - engine capacity of 6.0cc / 6000mm (cubed) Any help would be greatly appreciated Thanks in advance

Posted by DavidO242 1 year ago


one way air valves (like on a football,basketball etc)

Looking for valves see photo (ok don't uploader not working) Well a valve that you stick an inflator needle into like on a soccer ball, basket ball etc. Need 12-50 or so. Anyone have a source? I've searched but no luck, it might be I just haven't phrased it right but... TIA Danneauxs

Posted by danneauxs 6 years ago


electrical

Why does an AC of 1.5 Ton with 1 to 5 Star rating differ in power consumption though they all have the same compressor. I fail to understand how a 1 Star AC consumes more current than a 5 star rated AC?

Posted by Dipankar 3 years ago


Newbie DIY icebox AC

I'm building a DIY, small AC unit using a desk fan, ice, and an ice box cooler. The fan I'm using is the one below. http://global.rakuten.com/en/store/e-kurashi/item/1468640/ I'm planning on making tubes connected to the sides. I will insert the tubes inside the cooling box (I'm not sure where is best... Above or below the ice?) I'm also thinking about where to put the holes for the air to go in. Should I put them below the ice, above the ice, or does it not matter? Also for the ice: salt water ice, or frozen bottles in salt water ice mixture, dry ice, or just plain ice? What do you think? I'm hoping to have the ice last the night. 

Posted by daiquirikiss 5 years ago


controller for Inverter AC unit ?

Hi. I got problem and I cant find the solution. got outside unit inverter aircondition, but indoor unit is missing (resason why I get unit for discount price ) and now I cant run outside unit, because inverter AC you cant control without that PCB from indoorunit but I cant find new-used I search like crazy  days and no result :( is any chance to run that unit without original PCB ? maybe with arduino etc ?  and if anyone know for good store for AC parts (no matter which continent), I need for AIRWELL GC plus 9 thank you for all informations

Posted by primoz1 3 years ago


Living salad, makerbot songs, and noodle!

My first day at Instructables, I found myself sitting on a chair fabricated by the guy next to me, listening to plans for a living salad which would grow through your plate, fertilized by worms below the surface and a stained glass window made of dried fruit, trying to focus on absorbing all the information Vanessa and Noah were dishing out. Just beyond loomed the amazing fabrication facilities, with rows of 3D printers, zillion-axis CNC machines, a stocked electronics room, every kind of adhesive you could dream of, and even a test kitchen! It was a makers dream, Pier 9 had the material and equipment resources to allow us to realize nearly any idea we could dream up, and dream we did. It was immediately clear that the one month my collaborator Kyle (https://www.instructables.com/member/kylemcdonald/) and I had planned to spend there was not enough. Sadly, it was all we had, so we got to work immediately on Noodle, a little robot with the I/O of a machine but the thoughts and feelings of a human. I could go on about the shop at Pier 9, but the thing that really made the experience for me was the people. Hosting 10-12 AIRs at a time, the studio was always full with people building crazy things. One day we'd experiment with Nick's instruments fashioned from rocks, sticks, and water jugs while sampling cocktails from Ben's machine and Rima's cricket ganache, the next day we'd admire Aaron's work on hoodies that zipped around your hands while being serenaded by Andreas' makerbot which seemed to be singing the future. We were all so excited and inspired it wasn't unusual to find half the group there all weekend long or into the wee hours of the night. I won't go so far as to say anyone slept the night there, but...  Not only did we get to hang out in the AIRea, but we also got to know all the others working at Pier 9. This was a building full of people willing to chat about anything from caustics to contests, lend you their skateboard so you could learn how, or demo their latest projects. Vanessa and Noah couldn't have been more supportive and helpful, and it was so inspiring to run into them in the shop on weekends hacking away on crazy things of their own. With so much going on, we sometimes had to work hard to tune it out and stay focused on our Noodle. Luckily, Kyle and I had worked together before and we were able to divide and conquer pretty productively. Kyle handled the fabrication aspects, spec'ing all the hardware and designing and lasercutting then 3D printing the physical enclosure for Noodle. I was heads down on the software trying to hook up our raspberry pi to Amazon Mechanical Turk, speakers, a display, a camera, and an interface. Thankfully, the long hack sessions were broken up by Vanessa coming by to peek at my computer over my shoulder and ask, "what's taking so long? how hard can it possibly be!" ;) I will end this post here and get to work finishing up our instructable before Vanessa hunts us down. If the specifics of our project are a bit cryptic still, all will be revealed with the instructable post (see attached pictures for more mystery). And to all of you considering applying to the AIR program, DO IT! If you are a motivated, curious person with energy and ideas you will have a blast. And the weather is ok, too. Thanks Vanessa, Noah and Instructables!

Posted by lmccart 4 years ago


Reflections on Pier 9 Residency

My residency on the Pier lasted from January through June 2014, a total of six incredibly busy months, during which time I built a 3D printer with an un-bounded build volume and a low cost metal laser sintering 3D printer. It took nearly three months to learn to handle the overwhelming potential of each new day on the Pier. The Pier is such a focal point of creative energy and flux-- every day the Pier hosts thought leaders in design, fabrication, art, and engineering. I've never seen such a critical density of talent. In the residency program, I had the unique opportunity to collaborate with fashion designers, furniture makers, illustrators, and other engineers with a freedom and agility that I've never seen anywhere else. In one of many sudden collaborations, Anouk Wipprecht returned from a trip to LA and showed me an SLS 3D printed tentacle that she was considering using in a dress she was designing. I began thinking about FDM-printable compliant mechanisms and designed a tentacle more compatible with the fabrication process. Mikaela Holmes then saw the tentacles that I was printing and based on her input, I ran a couple more iterations. She then showed Paolo Salvagione these more developed designs, who in turn took it even further by adding servo-actuation to automate the piece's motion. Mikaela then iterated on the concept for several weeks, and settled on a multimaterial Objet fabrication process to make her amazing blossoming headdress. This kind of interaction could only have happened in the residency program. The other striking thing about the Pier is the learning infrastructure that surrounds each machine and process. Residents can get trained up on a machine under the instruction of the shop staff who have put together amazing documentation surrounding each machine (just see Dan Vidokavich's Haas VF-2SS video series). Tools, it turns out, aren't very useful unless you know how to use them and the Pier is full of extremely knowledgeable folks who always teaching through even the smallest actions. It's a very positive and healthy culture of always giving each other a hand. I have also never encountered so much support for realizing such personal projects. Noah Weinstein and Vanessa Sigurdson made sure no obstacle was insurmountable. When I needed to move my 3D metal printer prototype briefly off the Pier, Noah immediately located additional space and helped me move my prototype that weekend. Julia Cabral, Autodesk's environmental health and safety officer was also an amazing resource and advisor to my metal printer project, which involved high voltage, high powered lasers, explosive materials, and pressurized gases. Not only did Julia do tons of research to advise on proper sealing, venting, material selection, and gas sensing techniques, she also helped me draw up all the associated safety protocols for operating the prototype machine. I'd recommend the residency program to artists, designers, and engineers alike. The human and fabrication resources tare unparalleled and reside in a spectacular culture based on respect, openness, and mutual support.

Posted by andreasbastian 4 years ago


An embarrassment of riches

I was an Artist in Residence at Instructables from September-December 2013, and words cannot express how wonderful it was.  Instructables has recently built out what I can only imagine is the world's greatest general use workshop, at Autodesk's Pier 9 facility.  You are probably aware of this shop if you're reading Artist in Residency posts, but if not, check out the overview here and the machine details here.  I tried to learn and do EVERYTHING in this shop!  I didn't quite succeed in that but I came close enough that I didn't totally finish any of my projects.  I'd planned to make an articulated model of an Escher drawing and an 8 foot tall steel dinosaur statue, both projects I could probably have spent all my time there on.  There was so much awesome to learn about and experiment with, though, that I kept getting distracted by side projects and what-if's that I might not have had opportunity to mess around with later on.  So what I actually ended up making was a series of acrylic jewelry, two small cardboard dinosaur models, MOST of the Escher drawing (I finished it later), some sheet metal walking-leg linkage experiments, half of a new Mustache Ride, part of a sixth Pulse of the City heart, tests of chemically-mediated etching on metal, a pair of 3d printed snowflake ornaments, and the beginnings of a pair of antler pants.  (I will definitely write instructables for the dinosaur and the pants, when they are complete.) I loved it all.  I loved it all so much, and so consistently, that I had to try everything and was hardly able to finish anything.  I cut metal on the waterjet, I printed many 3d things on the 3d printers, I lased like it was going out of style, I lathed like I didn't know what I was doing (Yay Learnings!), I cut and welded and drilled and screwed and printed and ground and sewed and soldered and blasted and glued.  I was like a kid in a candy shop who can't finish the fudge because the lollipops are so tasty and then whoa! peanut brittle! peppermints! gumdrops!  The only part of the shop I didn't use was the test kitchen because, well, I don't really cook. Three months was not enough.  Three years would not be enough.  I feel so fortunate to have been in there doing anything at all for any amount of time, though.  Things I can do now that I couldn't do last summer include: turn wood on a lathe cut metal, stone, cardboard, etc on a waterjet etch metal on a laser printer operate a small vacuum former print multiple materials on an Objet Connex run a jointer and planer operate a Shopbot TIG weld aluminum (to be sure, I'm lousy at this still, but I know How) operate a sand blaster bend steel tubes I'm an introverted anti-social nerd so it has taken me to the bottom of this post to talk about the people.  I absolutely need to say how great the people there are - everyone, no matter their job description, makes things.  Everyone just gets how it is to lose yourself in making some weird possibly useless object that you might have to get rid of when you're done anyway, but you just need to work on it to figure out That One Thing that you didn't quite understand but now you do!  It is a rare and wonderful set of people.  And some of the people, it is explicitly their JOB to teach me about all the equipment and help me with any problems I had with anything at all. If you're reading this you should definitely apply for this program.  You do not want to miss out on working in this shop.

Posted by rachel 4 years ago


Air Pump

Does anybody know how to make an air pump for a aquarium out of stuff laying around your house?

Posted by kris142 10 years ago


ecoblast air horn

Can someone do a hommaed one, that cost less?http://www.ohgizmo.com/2009/07/13/ecoblaster-rechargable-air-horn-is-like-a-super-soaker-for-sound/

Posted by disceptre 9 years ago


Air Switch Dimmer

I would like to make a switch like the one in mathmos Air Switch. i am not sure how to but could this be done. or is there some thing close that i can do? need it for a school project. thanks pyr0000

Posted by pyr0000 11 years ago


Another car that runs on fresh air.

Here's another chap with a car that runs on compressed air.He's got more potential than past attempts, though - F1 engineering background, large backer, neat trick for extending range.The video and Previous BBC "airing"Canadian news articleCritical article from Oil Drum (Australian energy site)Oil Drum: part 2Air Car siteEDIT (MORE REFERENCES)Another BBC articleMDI Engineering site (they make the engines)Tata Motors (who plan to build the car)

Posted by Kiteman 10 years ago


Anyone use or play around with free to air tv?

My family and I do a lot of camping and I am interested in this technology, but I don't want to waste the money if it isn't going to work that well. Any information would be great, Thanks!

Posted by rdnkjeeper 11 years ago


how to make an aquarium air pump

Hi allso i do not know much about air pumps, but i wanted to construct onei know i need a diaphgram for the pump, but what else do i need?i found this replacement part (http://cgi.ebay.com/Perfecto-Aquarium-Air-Pump-200-Replacement-Diaphragm_W0QQitemZ200197939820QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item2e9cba226c&_trksid=p3286.m20.l1116) which was the diaphragm pump itselfit has some magnet part which it attaches to for the electric part,but say i wanted to make it to a kind of attachment where i wanted it to split to two wires, how would this work?thanks!

Posted by AXmichigan 9 years ago


Messed up my GF Macbook Air 2012 MotherBoard

Hey guys! Hope someone can help me, I got carried away unsoldering a usb port on my gf´s macbook air mb. Some IC's got knocked off, i still have them but dont know which way to solder them back on. Please some kind soul that has a mb at hand. The model is "661-6625" macbook air 2012 i've found some pics on google but nowhere near as high def or macro as required to observe the necessary detail. I post two pics regarding the area where the photo is required. Help!

Posted by tammasus 3 years ago


Ceramic capacitor in air conditioner DPAC12010H

Hi there,  I received a not-working air conditioner model DPAC12010H from someone who didn't need it anymore, and I took it to a friend who works with refrigerators to see if we could find the problem. We took it apart, and we found that a fuse mounted on the main PCB was shot. The fuse is 120V and 3.75A so I suppose it's only for the control circuit as the whole air conditioner runs at more than 9A on max capacity. Anyway, we temporarily bypassed the fuse with a copper wire to continue testing. We plugged it in, and immediately a component on the PCB (which I now believe is a ceramic capacitor) spew sparks and melted it's insulation. However after this incident the air conditioner works perfectly, and it blows very cool air (its a 12000 BTU machine after all). However I'm still concerned about that capacitor. I can not post a picture right now, maybe when I get back from work. It was brownish yellow, about 3/4" in diameter roughly same shape as a nickel. Does anyone have any idea what that capacitor might be for? Since the air conditioner is working now I'm guessing the sparks made it conductive, or maybe it's used for the dehumidifier which I have not tested.  I will buy a new fuse today and see what happens. The air conditioner draws about 9 A at full operation. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Posted by colorex 5 years ago


Working with pneumatics

Anyone know how to setup a simple air system? I have a pneumatic air cylinder with dual 1/4 inch NPT threads and a 6 inch throw. Ultimately I would like to have the cylinder extend when I flip one switch and release/contract under weight when I flip another switch. Think automotive airbag systems. Anyone know how to wire or plumb something like this up? Ultimately a compressor only option is what I'm looking for as a air tank would add too much weight. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks

Posted by prototype27 11 years ago


Air delivery system using pvc

Hi, I am a geocacher and I recently saw a youtube video of a cache container that was a 2 inch PVC pipe.  At the bottom, the cap had a tire valve in it.  When you pumped up the container, a pill bottle came out the top.  I have attempt to build something like this but nothing seems to work.  The pill bottle will not rise.  Can anyone help me with what I am doing wrong? Thanks, Kent

Posted by tkuhrich 6 years ago


laws

Does any body know wherer i can get laws on north ridgeville.oh

Posted by knexsuperbuilderfreak 10 years ago


Manual air compressor

I had this idea just drop on me a few minutes ago and I was wondering if anyone could give me some feedback on if something like this would be feasible or not. Also if anyone thinks it's a good idea just go ahead and build it because I dont have the tools or space for something like this in any case. The idea is to have some sort of tank with a large internal volume, cut it of at the top and arrange a sort of secured piston with a heavy weight on top, attach it all to a frame so that the piston stays level and secure. The piston with the weight on can then be connected to a multi-stage pulley system to allow one to lift the  heavy weigth, sure it would take a long time but for a manual air compressor it should be feasible Then at the bottom of the tank one would have a high pressure release valve with some sort of standard connector for transfering the compressed air to a sort of pressure tank for use. I never saw anything like this before, although I'm sure someone must have done it at one point or another. So what do you all think? Any input?

Posted by wolty 7 years ago


Flight Patterns

This is a video of all of the flight traffic in sky. It is very beautiful. VideoHome Page of the site.Thanks

Posted by joejoerowley 11 years ago


Air Conditioner Condensate

I've been thinking recently about ways to reuse the condensed water vapor that comes out of my air conditioner condenser. I've currently got a bucket set up under the spot where the condensate drips out just to see how much water is actually wasted. With the summer heat, I've got the AC going almost all day, and it comes out to about 1 gallon a day. What I'd ultimately like to do is have a storage tank for this water that I can use to water the lawn, wash the car, etc. The problem, though, is that the water outlet is very low to the ground, so only a small bucket will fit directly underneath (meaning it overflows by the end of the day). I'd like to have some sort of hose direct the fluid into a much larger container, and I'd like to do it without electricity. I can't think of a way to move the water without using some kind of pump, though. Any ideas?

Posted by hobscrk777 10 years ago


actuators

Here is a public discussion board where we can discuss actuators.      -how they work.      -where you can buy them. etc.  

Posted by m5industriesinc 8 years ago


My 2 Months as an AiR

I read through all of the 'my time as an AIR' posts to get inspiration and to dial my thoughts on what to write. There was one common theme amongst them all - Being an AIR at Instructables is the most awesomely incredible experience! There are so many thoughts running through my head and heart at the moment, it's hard to know where to begin.   I came to the Pier from Northern Idaho. Where traffic is four cars at a traffic light and criminals are high school kids smoking weed in an alley. Arriving in the Bay was a bit of a culture shock. It was great to experience the Bay Area beyond that of a vacation, and to have an idea what it was like to live here.  When I started my residency I was a bit intimidated - by the tools and by all the creative projects everyone was doing. Once I completed some training courses and got to know people at the Pier, I found it was easy to get into a routine and to be completely comfortable working away in the shop.  While I was an AIR I completed a handful of different projects (check them out!). I started the program with the idea that I would make some sort of furniture piece that incorporated plant life. What that piece was, I had no idea. After starting some other side projects, my main project really started to define itself and take some direction. It was great having the freedom to make changes to project ideas and really just go where your mind takes you.  The Pier is full of some very creative and talented people - all of which were so helpful along the way. Whether I was stuck in the design process or the building process, there was also someone to help me get over that hump.  The Best Parts: - The freedom to make what you want, when you want - The friendly, creative and knowledgable Instructables employees - Access to high quality tools and equipment - Eating too much at the food trucks - The view from the Pier! The Worst Parts: - Eating too much at the food trucks - 2 months is too short! - Leaving Advice for future AIRs: Don't be intimidated. Be confident in your ideas. And don't be afraid to change your direction when a new idea comes your way. Thank you to everyone who made my residency as amazing as it was. The people and the residency were both very inspiring. It was surreal to be able to make what you want, when you want, with access to just about everything you can imagine. For me, it felt like a once in a lifetime experience.  -Tess

Posted by tessalene 5 years ago


home made airsoft gun?

I am thinking about making a airsoft sniper tried looking on youtube and here but can't find anything does anybody have any ideas?

Posted by whitehawknoah 8 years ago


AirDrop Irragation

Anyone  ever heard of this airdrop irrigation. http://www.jamesdysonaward.org/Projects/Project.aspx?ID=1722 Sounds pretty amazing, in the vid he talks about producing 1 liter h2o a day with a small one he build at home. I'm thinking the fan could be replaced with a sun pipe.

Posted by Arias Bolt 6 years ago


Pump for little pieces of paper

Hi, I'm going to make a display cabinet for an art project. Please see image for more info. The idea is to have a container (gray box) with ash on the back side of this cabinet, then there should be a pump (red dot) emptying this container and blowing the ash to the front true a tube (see red line) into a double glass window.  How can I create something like this? the problem is the transfering of the ash (little pieces of paper) from the back to the front.

Posted by vkranendonk 9 years ago


My time as an AiR

When I got the invitation to be an Artist in Residence, my wife's first reaction was hilarity, since I have the drawing skills of an orangutan. Getting here, and being here, has been a really big deal.  This site has been a big part of my life for several years, and it has been a real pleasure to share space with some of the most intelligent and creative people I have ever encountered.  I have seen genuine art being created, and wonderfully subversive acts being committed. Being in such an environment was, in equal parts, intimidating and exhilarating.  Although I have a long list of projects to try, I was sometimes spoiled for choice because of the freedom to create as I pleased. Projects I have created in my time here have been; Duct tape boomerang Paper bag kite Coffee stapler Cardboard conch Sculpted head Small-scale wave power generator (mentioned in the newsletter - woot!) Laser-cut penny maze Rock, Paper, Scissors board game Robot face stencil This is a shorter list than I would have liked (boy, you should see the length of my "to do" list!), but the downside of being given the freedom to create is the lack of enforced deadlines.  That is a failing on my part, and not a failing of the AIR system. On the up side, I have been involved in a lot more of the running and planning of the site than I thought I would.  I have judged contests, taken part in planning meetings, got involved in longer-term projects on the site, and helped de-bug the new AiR process (bring your bank details!).  The phrase dates me, but I grok the site a lot more now.  I've also seen the planned projects of the next guy, and they are awesome! I also got the chance to run a site Challenge to launch the new Birding Channel.  This was, I've got to say, disappointing - given the amount of publicity I managed to get for the challenge amongst the birding community, I had hoped for a lot more entries.  I guess that there are not many folk who are both Maker and Birder? I also got the opportunity to help out in other folks' projects, and to learn new skills, both traditional and modern (laser cutters are awesome!), from folk like Noah, Matt, Kelsey, and got a far clearer image of how hard, and how fun, it is to keep this site running. San Francisco is a great, mad, weird city, and I love it, but the most surreal day was being the witness to the wedding of an ex-pupil, who came over to the US to get married and have the honeymoon all at once.  I first met this person when they were nine, and now they're married... (I feel old again). It's hard, in a piece like this, to avoid rambling, so I'll stop now, except for one final point: This past month genuinely ranks as one of my top Life Experiences.  That may sound like an exaggeration, but if you know me, you know how important this site has been to me over the years.  Eric, if I ever get the chance to do it again, I will have your arm off at the elbow! And, you know, I think the rest of my family will as well ...

Posted by Kiteman 6 years ago


Meet the Boy With the Lego Hand

When Coby Unger makes, he makes the world a better place. The Atlantic recently published an article about the artist in residence and his work to build better prosthetics for children. Unger worked with a boy named Aiden Robinson to dream up the swiss army knife of prosthetics with attachments that include a Wii controller, spoon, legos, and a bow for playing the violin. Check out more of Coby's projects, and read the article to learn more about Aiden, the boy with the Lego hand. 

Posted by tinaciousz 4 years ago


To Pier 9, Thanks for Everything !

Tl;dr : 1. people are the greatest resource at the pier 2. sometimes it’s hard to work due to too much awesomeness Seriously. Me and my collaborator, Radamés Ajna, had a couple of projects we wanted to do in the spring/summer of 2014, and while looking for some shop space in Oakland, someone recommended we check out the AiR program. We applied. We thought that if we got accepted Autodesk would give us a desk, some nice hand tools, and access to their software. And that would’ve been great. Coming from Brazil, where it feels like we solve everything using hot glue, zip ties and duct tape, that would have been more than enough. Weren’t we surprised when we visited the shop. . . Holy crap, everything is here. Some of the machines are bigger than my apartment, and there’s even a swimming pool ! I’m pretty sure everyone has written about all the great machines, because, yeah, they are great, but to me, the most important aspect of being an AiR at the pier was the people. The shop staff who not only teach you how to use the machines, but also have enough collective experience to help you solve any kind of material/machining/construction problem. Want to vacuum form foam? No problem. Want to glue glass to cement? Someone has done it before. Want to weld titanium? Easy. Having access to the tools is good, but having people that know how to use them is even more awesomenest. The same is true for the CAD people who help you set up and use all kinds of modeling and design software. Not only that, but they get excited when you use their software. Not having had a lot of experience with 3D modeling prior to my residency, it was a great opportunity to learn it using Fusion 360. Another very special group of people were the other AiRs. The ones that came in with us (Anouk, Alex, U-Ram, Adrien, Paolo, Scott, Mikaela) and the ones that were already there when we  arrived (Andy, Aaron, Rima, Andreas, Ben). What a diverse crowd. It was great to get to know everybody, and also to be able to share experiences and expertise. I don’t even know how many times Paolo and Andy saved me from searching for “metal thing with a hole” or “thing with a thing inside” on google, because they knew exactly what I was looking for. Invaluable! Sometimes it’s a bit tricky to explain your project and get everyone excited about it, because everyone has such a diverse background and set of interests, but learning how to talk about our projects from different perspectives was a challenge that I enjoyed. And, last but not least, the IRL Instructables community; another very diverse, active and enthusiastic group of people at the pier. I don’t know how they do it, but it seems like they are always happy, and making cookies. The sum of all of these people is something awesome. There’s always something interesting going on at the Pier (even at night and on the weekends), which sometimes can be a bit distracting, but also motivating. I will sorely surely miss them all.

Posted by thiagohersan 4 years ago


masynmachien's time as an AIR

I had the honour and pleasure of spending the month of July 2013 as an Artist in Residence at Instructables HQ. An unforgettable experience! I feel like I cannot even begin to describe it, so forgive me for keeping it simple. The most tangible amazing thing is the unbelievable workshop, a true makers heaven! I mainly worked on the laser cutters and the 3D printers myself, but these are just a part of the new workshop set up at Pier 9. There’s also the experimental kitchen, the sowing corner, the electronics lab, the high-end CNC machines, a complete wood shop and a full blown metal shop. More importantly however was working among the people behind Instructables. To experience up close how they work very hard to make Instructables not only the biggest and best Show-and-Tell buy also the best “maker medium” ever. Having just moved to the new facilities at Pier 9, there was a lot of extra work to get the workshop accessible and operational, but they moved mountains to get us Artists in Residence onto the machines and making things. Working alongside three other Artists in Residence was also unique chance. Usually, when I’m surrounded by makers, most of them aren’t older than 12. But even as each of us had his inner kid very much alive, having some serious making going on around you is very inspiring (as some of my Instructables will show). I also very much appreciate how my daughter Tika was warmly received when see joined me at Instructables HQ. One month was far too short to spend with the people at Instructables HQ.  I was constantly torn between on the one hand getting to know the people better and on the other hand leaving them continue there hard work and trying to make as much things as possible myself. And to make it even harder there were the lures of the magnificent city of San Francisco and of the Bay Area. My conclusion is clear: I want to come back! But then, being a month away from home is not easy either. Tika joined me during the second half of my stay, which was great, but I missed my wife and youngest daughter. Back home in Belgium I’m first taking some rest, spending time with family and friends, working on some due home improvements and preparing some kids workshops. Writing up the Instructables on the projects I did will take some time. They will be published over the coming months. After all, I have about 15 new projects to document. The thread through my AIR was a laser cut (advent) calendar. A series of toy/gift assembly kits designed to be laser cut out of one acrylic sheet and to be wrapped into a cardboard package opening separately on each kit. The only parts added to the laser cut parts are some elastic bands, screws and nuts. The idea is to have a calendar that is easily made in several copies, with designs accommodating for thickness variations in the acrylic sheet and a concept of cutting and wrapping it all with little handwork. I managed to design, cut and test 13 different toys/gifts. I consider it the first chapter of a full advent calendar. I will make an Instructable on each of the 13 and put them in a collection, together with an Instructable on the calendar concept. The eye catcher of my stay was an iPhone/iPad (or Android) controlled RC Blimp with video feedback. For this I used the plug-and-play Dension WIRC system. This system leading to rather heavy build (200g) comparted to my other blimp projects, I decided upon using a large spherical balloon. From this (and from watching Doctor Who) sprung the idea to make it into a large eye. I named it ‘In the blimp of an eye”. The project that was the most of a learning experience was designing and 3D printing nested dolls. Deviating from the classic Russian dolls, I learned how to design these in 123D Design, how to calculate sizes and experienced the possibilities and limitations of different 3D printing techniques. I hope you will enjoy reading the resulting Instructables, just as I enjoyed doing these projects at Instructables HQ. I want to thank once more the people at Instructables and Autodesk for this wonderful opportunity. Thank you, thank you, thank you! Yvon Masyn aka masynmachien

Posted by masynmachien 5 years ago


Making The Most Of Your Time Here

If you're reading this, you're hopefully about to become an AiR in the best workshop on earth. Congratulations! This is an amazing opportunity, and i'd like to share my experiences so that you can hopefully glean some wisdom. When I got here, I was quickly humbled. For the first time in my life, I was intimidated. I had never been in such a vast playground and wealth of resources. I put myself under a lot of pressure. I started with some smaller projects that ended up taking a lot longer than anticipated. I did everything the hard way. During this time I formed a great relationship with shop staff, and gained a deep respect for them. A month will go by and you will look back and wonder where it all went. There are a million distractions, and it's a tough game to balance them all. In my last two months, I decided I needed to pick a problem to solve. I bit off more than I could chew, and I chewed it. I did something a bit unconventional, and did a project on sustainability. I was in over my head, and I brought in a friend for help. And i'm really glad I did. Don't constrain yourself to being an 'artist'. You are about to immerse yourself deep in the heart of the maker movement. Make things that you will be proud of, that you can do nowhere else.  This is an nearly infinite opportunity, with the only limiting factor being time. You are skilled enough, have the aptitude, and can do absolutely anything. So what on earth do you make?  Quick Tips: -Pick a problem, and solve it.  Pick a problem that's bigger than one person.  -Don't shackle additional commitments during this time. (I burnt out from a big side project) Devote yourself to the shop. -Reach out to someone at Autodesk, and see if you can get mentorship, or use your art to inform things that they are interested in. Form a relationship with them. You will find wisdom and friendship. -Find a peer, and check in regularly about the scope of your work.  -Pick someone to collaborate on a big project with. Make someone else's dream come true.  -Space out your classes. Don't do it all at once, or you'll forget what that critical button on the DMS is.  Time Breakdown: 33% of your time goes towards collaboration 33% towards learning new stuff that's way above your comfort level 33% for the stuff you can do with your eyes closed

Posted by buchananwp 4 years ago


AiRs in the Media

Our AiRs have been making waves both online and through published articles. Check out some of the cool articles that have been written about the work that our AiRs are doing!

Posted by Nesserz 4 years ago


Who's Who in the AiR Program

Check out the talented artists we have in the AiR Program - For a full size view, click here.

Posted by Nesserz 4 years ago


What air gun(s) do you have?

What air gun(s) do you have? Please list them here. NO AIRSOFT!!

Posted by masterofsniping92 9 years ago


Compressed air can - How to make larger one, refillable?

Hello! You know those compressed air can for cleaning dust form electronics and computers. They are working well, but if you use them a lot they become pretty expensive. For heavy user's alternative is to use compressor. They are not so expensive any more, but they are loud, heavy, large and not so practical to carry with you… So, after take in consideration that written above great thing would be to make reusable, larger, compressed air can. Something simple to use, some on/off leverage and small nozzle, and also refillable - fill it with that compressor which is heavy and loud. Some manometer would be nice, just to know how much air is inside. That "can" should be larger than Do you have any idea how to make it? Please share details, ideas, plans, other help… Thank you in advance! Best to all!

Posted by davor07 6 years ago


Got any ideas???

I was wondering if anybody has some drawings on how to make an gas/gun our a.k.a air gun.Gas chargers.These gas chargers show at the link above are all i can get at Iceland, They do not sell air guns in iceland.And it would not hurt if this gun could shoot multiple shots from the same gas/cream charger.So i ask: Got drawings???

Posted by Enzo55 11 years ago


Installing twin air horns on motorcycle HELP!!!!

Hi  I own a Kawasaki ER5 and I am finding it difficult to have both horns working. I have used the original horn wiring 2 wires to a connector block with 4 wires coming out to each horn. Is this wrong? if so please give me some instructions (that I would understand) how to install correctly please  Thank you Darren

Posted by dazzer730 7 years ago


Looking for a particular type of air valve

So 2 parts to this question, one is what would it be called, the other, where would I find it. I am looking for a valve  that would have 3 stems, for lack of a better term.  One one end would be the source, another the output and the last would alternate between pulling from the source and pushing to the output.   Any Googling tips?  Not looking for anything industrial, simple small plastic valve would suffice.

Posted by phdearthworm 5 years ago


Air ride bicycle suspension

So i've been interested in pneumatis for quite some time and recently I came across a small air cylinder (6 inch travel), 12 volt air compressor, 12 volt valve, and misc fittings. I got really excited and without thinking twice I grabbed tools and started hacking up my old beach cruiser (it was quite a mess anyway after 3 trips to burningman). So this is the outcome... I can control the up/down with a momentary on switch out back. Now just looking at this mess its easy to see that well i obviously can't weld. Never tried... Anyway it rides really sloppy as you can imagine, much like an old Lincoln with the shocks blown out, but it is so much fun! Now i pose the question to you community members, how would you have done this different? Looking forward to your responses!

Posted by prototype27 11 years ago


Air tank testing

I have recently acquired a 25 litre compressor on which the motor was seized so my plan is to replace the motor and pump with a couple of fridge compressors however the tank is more than 10 years old and although I cannot see any damage is their anyway to check it is safe to pressurize to 8 bar? it has 175PSI stamped on it so I assume its designed with that as the maximum working pressure but I want to know if I can get it checked as I don't want to blow myself and my garage apart if it bursts I'm in the UK

Posted by patrickshadow 5 years ago


Program Feedback

What's it like to be an Artist in Residence at Instructables?  Don't ask us, ask our previous residents! Being an artist in residence at Instructables by Samuel Bernier Jayefuu as Instructables' Artist in Residence by James Williamson (Jayfu) Last Day at Instructables by Kelsey Breseman (SelkeyMoonbeam) My time as an AiR by Mark Langford (Kiteman) My Summer as an AIR at Instructables by Gabriella Levine (gabriellalevine) Field Report - Mads Hobye as an Artist in Residence by Mads Hobye (madshobye) My Month at Instructables as an Artist in Residence by Tom Flock (Tomdf) What it's like to be an Artist in Residence at Instructables by Tim Wikander (timwikander) Reflecting on my AiResidency by Taylor Cone (tcone) The worst time of my life by Mario Caicedo Langer (M.C. Langer) Fozzy13's AiR Experience! by Adam Fasnacht (Fozzy13) Masynmachien's time as an AIR  by Yvon Masyn (masynmachien) My 2 Months as an AiR by Tess Howell (Tessalene) An embarrassment of riches by Rachel McConnell (rachel) My experience as an AIR by Tanner Welch (Tanner W) The AiR05 - designed and built during Q4:13 by Timothy Lipton (timmylip) Living Salad, makerbot songs, and noodle by Lauren Mccarthy (lmccart) How to got to Maker Heaven by Mikaela Holmes (MikaelaHolmes) Crazy, Amazing and Delicious AIR Experience by Rima Khalek (rimamonsta) Autodesk: Art Residency of Generosity by Scott Kildall Autodesk Artist in Residency by Anouk Wipprecht (anoukwipprecht) Duck Confit, Perfected by Aaron Geman (aaron_geman) Pier 9, I've never met anyone quite like you before. by Andrew Maxwell-Parish (ElectricSlim) To Pier 9, Thank for Everything by Thiago Hersan My Introduction to the 21st Century by John Whitmarsh My Autodesk Residency by Benjamin Cowden (tinkertinker) Talking about my Summer by Laura Devendorf (LDevendorf) Pier 9 is a Disneyland for Makers by Alejandro Palandjoglou (alepalan) Reflections on Pier 9 Residency by Andreas Bastian (andreasbastian) Making the Most of Your Time Here by Will Buchanan (buchananwp) Reflections on the Pier by Reza Ali (syedrezaali)

Posted by noahw 6 years ago


Would a water/air powered CNC machine be feasible?

I was wondering if a water/air powered CNC machine would be feasible. Such a power method would allow the device to be powered by an outside compressor or pump or something else that supplies a flowing (pun) source of air/water. This would allow the only parts needed to be inside the CNC machine to be made by a CNC or small electricaly driven control valves and maybe some potentiometers for position sensing. I have noticed that most of the CNC plans that I see use stepper motors which if I understand right offer only 1 speed, but I do not really understand why. Please tell me what you think. I have been looking at these "build your own CNC printer" and "build your own CNC mill" sites alot lately, but I have no clue yet when it comes to such things.

Posted by nstenzel 6 years ago


Maximum cooling efficency

I am looking to build a compact cooling unit, sized under 12"x12"x12".  I have seen and built 2 of the most common types of home made air conditioning units.... 1) Run air across a block of ice or other frozen object. 2) Blow a fan through a whirl (or other pattern) of copper tubing and pump very cold water through. So my question is which would offer more cooling capacity? The first option is cooling with Ice which is below freezing, with minimal surface area.  The second option is cooling with cold water but still above 32 degrees, could potentially have more surface area.

Posted by scubaru 8 years ago


Best way to Seal bags together (air seal) ?

Http://www.lawrimoreproject.com/images/visart-news-magnum-500.jpgWell, I thought it be kinda fun to take a similar idea, but my question is, What's the best way to seal bags? The guy used many black plastic bags, never stated how it's connected. I've attempted box tape, but when i tape 2 bags together fresh from the box, and try inflating, the left/right sides leak just about every time, and cant always hold pressure. (Yes id like it to be able to hold some pressure!!) So, is tape really the best way to do that?

Posted by Killa-X 10 years ago


Rc Airplane Guide

I have been thinking about building an R/C airplane. Here are the specifications I need. L:3ft W:4ft H:6in ( 15 with prop and landing gear Engine: Chain saw motor Prop: 12in Control surfaces: 2 ailerons, elevator I don't know anything about R/C and here are my questions: 1.) How do you assemble an R/C system? 2.) What is needed to run 4 servos(3 control, 1 throttle)? 3.) Where should I buy stuff? 4.) What else should I know? I know how to connect servos to an air frame and everything, but I need to know how to connect a full R/C system together( receiver, servos, battery, etc.). Any help? Please. P.S. My air frame will be, a wing, a wooden dowel going to tail, tail, motor and muffler. I used this design because I have no weight added other than required materials.

Posted by ry25920 10 years ago


how much psi can a a1 steaksauce container hold

I have a project and i need to know how much psi a a1 steaksauce container can hold

Posted by rollingstoner357 10 years ago