CFL

Who else uses CFL ( Compact fluorecent Lightbulb) I my self replaced all my rooms light with them, so 4 bulbs in total. They sell them at Sams club, 8 CFL units that replace 60 watt bulbs for about $10. Instead of using 60 watts they only use 13, also they do not get as hot making your room cooler in the wee hours of the morning. Im not sure if they sell them for the smaller bulbs like the skinny ones ceiling fan, because thats the kind of bulbs we have on our wall. I decided not to use that light for now. Most of all the light bulbs in our house are fluorecent, except the bathrooms, a few lights we use rarely and the 3 different intensity bulbs. Who else uses CFL and if you don't, do you want to switch?

Posted by acer73 11 years ago


5 volts ballast

Can I have the circuit for the 5 volts cfl lamp ballast. Please! Thanks.

Posted by remyjovero 4 years ago


Bad result from the CFL driver for the flyback transformer.

Ts been a while that i have tryed to make a nice arc from my 25 watt cfl driver, the only pin on the cfl that are working are the pin 1 and 4, i i have attempted to connect the pin 1 and 2 toguether and 3 and 4 toguether, i connected both of the mix on the flyback and i could get a huge arc, but i plugged it like 5 sec, and i stopped touching the HV output with the 0v ground  for like 2 sec then my cfl has exploded like a bomb, there was lound noise, and made a hole in my table. so im not gonna try that again. Anyway i can only get 0.5 cm arc from the flyback, and i dont know what to do to make it larger, i know that the 25w cfl can do better. Any suggestion? Sorry for my bad english.

Posted by insistent 9 years ago


CFL's putting out too much UV radiation?

Our local (I think) news service has done a story about CFL's emitting too much UV radiation, You can view it here.Would you rather sit under an incandescent light or a CFL for a extended period of time?Do you think they should have warning labels on them?Do you have any other opinions on CFL's and energy saving globes?Or do you think this is all just a way to get more people to but the old incandescent bulbs?

Posted by thermoelectric 9 years ago


What to do with a tube from a CFL that has broken electronics?

HiI have a couple of broken CFL's, The tube still works and I want to do something with it.Any ideas on how to make it light up from 12 volt, Without a ionization antenna (Using the heating filaments instead).Any other ideas??Anyone else want to know what to do with them too?I don't want any comments that say THROW IT OUT or similar

Posted by thermoelectric 9 years ago


CFL (compact fluorescent light)?

Hey everyone, Not too sure if this is the ideal place to post, if not please forgive me :) Basically, I want the spiral type CFL safely cleaned and emptied so I can use it. - I couldn't find a place selling 'recycled' ones or similar, I also dislike the idea of doing it myself and getting mercury all over me :(. I am thinking of contacting some manufacturers to see if they would sale me some defective ones that haven't been filled with nasty stuff :). Just wondering if anyone knew of a place where I can get them, hassle free. I'm a UK lad though, to make things harder :) any help much appreciated as always.

Posted by lukus001 9 years ago


Help upgrading CFL circuit? Want to drive cfl's up to 25w.

Hello I have built this circuit, it can drive cfl's up to 15w, how do i modify it so that it can drive cfl's up to 25w?  I am using D313 for his project as the D882 didn't gave me the results i needed. Using 12v battery. Here is the original instructable link https://www.instructables.com/id/A-simple-low-voltage-inverter-for-fluorescent-lam/?ALLSTEPS (This question is optional) Do u think the transformer i made for this circuit can be used for the famous Jeanna's light (Joule's Thief). If yes then how it would connect on the circuit? I will be making two or three more transformers like this. Do u think it needs modifications for its working like number of turns for the primary, secondary and feedback, different wire gauge?

Posted by Clarkdale44 4 years ago


CFL Recycling at Home Depot

CFLs (compact fluorescent light bulbs) are becoming increasingly popular: right from the article linked to below, "compact fluorescents use up to 75 percent less energy, last longer and cost less over time than incandescent bulbs." Plus, they come in a fun, curly-q shape.However, they contain trace amounts of mercury, which makes recycling of them difficult--until now. Home Depot (which, to my surprise, is the second-largest retail company in the United States behind Wal-Mart) is offering comprehensive recycling for CFLs: any brand, at any of the nearly 2,000 Home Depot locations. Read the article from the New York Times here

Posted by joshf 10 years ago


How much Mercury is in Compact Fluorescent (CFL) bulbs, watch batteries, and coal-fired power plants?

In Brennn10's Compact Fluorescent Instructable there was a short discussion about the amount of mercury contained in CFL bulbs. The same topic came up in a mailing list I read, and there was some interesting analysis worth sharing.Statement:The Stranger (the Seattle weekly) has a column called "Dear Science" where the typically quite intelligent author argued that CFL bulbs weren't all that "better" for the environment because inevitable improper disposal put more mercury-n-shit into the environment. So unless you got all your power from a mercury spewing coal plant, you shouldn't use CFL's . And Seattle, getting a majority of it's power from hydro, shouldn't use CFL's.This was called into question for being selective analysis that encourages an attitude of "there's not currently a solution, so keep doing what you're doing", and elicited the following response:Just so I can bore everyone with what I think is the current level of knowledge about mercury and CFLs, here's some of the current information.NRCan did a study on how much mercury is actually in CFLs, and compares them to other typical consumer sources (e.g., watch batteries--if you throw one of them out, you've throw out five times as much mercury as in a CFL):http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/energystar/english/consumers/questions-answers.cfm#mercuryAfter reading this, I actually worked out these numbers for myself on how CFL savings compare to mercury releases a few months ago. Of course, this is all more environmental destruction brand X vs. brand Y discussion that was being talking about.I was curious about what the numbers work out to, so I went to dig for some data; this is what I came up with.In 1999, about 1.75 trillion kWh were generated by coalEnergy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 1999, Figure 26In 1999, 47.8 tons/year of mercury emissions came out of coal-fired power plants.Source: U.S. EPA, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.1999 National Emissions Inventory for Hazardous Air Pollutants.http://www.epa.gov/ttn/chief/net/1999inventory.html#final3haps.This calcs out to a figure of 0.025 mg mercury per kWhAssuming 5 mg mercury per CFL, the equivalence point is about 200 kWh--a CFL would need to save 200 kWh before getting tossed in the trash. A quick calculation shows that this is about how much a CFL saves in half a year, if it were run 24-7: 75 W for an incandescent; 25 W for an equivalent CFL = 657 vs. 219 kWh/year, or 438 kWh/year difference.Of course, this assumes that the coal mercury emission rate is the same as it was in 1999; I'm not sure if measures have been taken since then to reduce mercury emissions. Also, this is assuming that 100% of the power saved by the CFL would be generated by coal-fired power plants. But even with that assumption, coal is such a large fraction of the power generation (typically about half)--it would jump from six months to a year, instead. Of course, this period gets longer assuming a realistic duty cycle, but still, those numbers all seem to pencil in below typical installed lifetimes of CFLs.Finally, there's a article from Home Energy magazine (behind a subscriber link), where somebody did a similar calculation with more current numbers, I think.http://www.homeenergy.org/article_full.php?id=457&article;_title=Understanding_CFLsHome Energy MagazineNovember/December 2007Understanding CFLsby Richard Benware"Although the use of CFLs is steadily spreading, public understanding about how to dispose of them responsibly has not kept pace."Life Cycle BenefitsIn order to disprove the myths about CFLs, let's begin at the beginning. When CFLs are created, manufacturers dose the bulb with a small amount of mercury. This mercury, when electrically stimulated, releases UV light, which subsequently reacts with a phosphor coating to create visible light. Thus mercury is an essential part of every CFL; without it, the bulbs would not produce light. The typical dose of mercury is about the size of a pen tip, and these doses have been getting smaller and smaller. One reason for this is that the laws resulting from the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive have made it illegal for CFLs in Europe to contain more than 5 milligrams (mg) of mercury.In the United States, there are no such laws limiting the amount of mercury in lightbulbs as yet, but members of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) have voluntarily agreed to limit the amount of mercury in the CFLs that they produce to 5 mg for bulbs of up to 25 watts and 6 mg for bulbs of 25 to 40 watts. The average CFL on store shelves today contains about 4 mg of mercury, and nearly all the CFLs in production contain less than 5 mg. The mercury used in all the CFLs produced in the United States represents 0.18% of the mercury used in all U.S. products andindustrial processes.CFLs do not release mercury as long as they are intact. In fact, they reduce net mercury emissions in the environment by conserving energy. For every kWh of electricity used by consumers, the average power plant emits over 1.5 lb of pollutants. If a 75W incandescent is replaced by an 18W CFL, the CFL will use 456 kWh less energy than the incandescent over its 8,000 hour lifetime. The Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) contains data on the emissions of the average power plant. Using eGRID's information to calculate the average emissions per kWh, we find that this single CFL has prevented the release of 2.72 lb of sulfur dioxide, 1.05 lb of nitrogen oxide, 5.67 mg of mercury, and over 700 lb of CO2.It is important to note that these are the reductions from the average U.S. power plant. The eGRID data show that, on average, nonbaseload emissions tend to be dirtier. And in addition to reducing emissions, CFLs save money for the consumer. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) gives a 2006 average residential electricity cost of $.1008/kWh. Using the example given above, and basing our calculation on this figure, we find that a consumer would save about $46 on energy over the lifetime of the CFL.When these bulbs finally do reach the end of their useful life, there are several pathways they can take. In the best-case scenario, the bulbs are recycled. Recycling rates are increasing, thanks to state regulations -- California and Minnesota have banned altogether throwing CFLs in the trash -- and improved consumer awareness. In 1999, it was estimated that only 15% of all fluorescent lightbulbs were recycled. Currently, that number has increased to around 25%, with higher levels in commercial applications. Since an average of 98.9% of the mercury is successfully recovered in the recycling process, this pathway generates minimal emissions.Even the CFLs that are discarded in the trash are unlikely to release much of their mercury. Although most of them break under current trash disposal methods, some remain unbroken, and will not release any mercury. But those that do break are not likely to release much mercury. EPA estimates that only 0.2% of the remaining mercury in a spent bulb is elemental vapor. The rest of the mercury is in the glass, the phosphor coating, and the electrodes of the bulb. Mercury absorbed in these areas is not readily released. In fact, an EPA study found that only 6.8% of the total mercury in a broken bulb will be released. Since the average bulb on the market today contains only 4 mg of mercury, it will release only about 0.27 mg, even if it breaks when it is thrown in the trash.The only disposal option that could lead to the release of any significant amount of mercury is incineration. Today, many incinerators have advanced mercury control technologies. CFLs disposed of in such incinerators would release up to 90% of their mercury, but those emissions would then be removed by these technologies. Incinerators without these technologies are not capable of removing the mercury. But even after accounting for all of the emissions that occur via all of the routes listed above, CFLs represent a mere 0.01% of total U.S. mercury emissions annually.It is important to note that even if CFLs released all of their mercury, the environment would still be better off than it would be if nobody used CFLs. This is true because the average power plant releases 5.67 mg of mercury to power each 75W incandescent bulb. In short, replacing incandescents with CFLs is a great way to save energy, reduce mercury emissions, and save money (see "Discounting CFLs").

Posted by ewilhelm 11 years ago


Question on CFL and incandescent mix

This is weird, and occurred just the other day: For about 2 days in a row, while sitting at the computer, I heard a very high pitched whine. Naturally I thought it was the HD going, since it was about 8 inches from my head. The second night of this though, was giving me a headache so I pushed back from the computer to try to find which direction it came from. To my surprise, it wasn't the computer, but was at that frequency that it was hard to find which direction it actually did come from. Then, one of the light bulbs in the light fixture blew out and the whine vanished. Background: the fixture has 2 bulbs in it, one was an incandescent bulb, one was a CFL. The bulb that was complaining so loudly, was in fact, the incandescent bulb. They are wired in parallel, so the other bulb (CFL) continued to light the room after the one bulb failed. The question is this: Is it unwise to mix bulbs like this (I only did it because I only replaced the one burnt out bulb with the CFL) ? Did the CLF cause the filament of the incandescent bulb to vibrate at I high frequency and finally burn out? Or was this all just co-incidence?

Posted by Goodhart 9 years ago


EDN references INSTRUCTABLES

EDN (i.e. Electronic Design News), an electronics Engineering magazine has linked to Instructables concerning the taking apart of a CFL: "Here's a photo of the innards of one of the CFLs that failed: Note the brown, too-hot-looking marks on the plastic base. (If you want to take a part a CFL yourself, I recommend the how-to article at Instructables.com."The link to the EDN article is HERE.

Posted by Goodhart 10 years ago


Help please

I've dismantled a cheap & nasty fax machine. Out of this I've extracted a Dyna Image scanning unit, CFL illumination, 7 wires. I'd quite like to use the CFL, and maybe the scanning part, but does anyone know how to use this? I've not found this particular unit on the internet - sticker says "DL100-05EUIC (BARCODE) PHFA201663" L

Posted by lemonie 9 years ago


Someone copied my instructable and taken part in same contest

HelloI submitted my first intructable Make Compact LED Lamp (CLL) from a Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL) on 2nd June 2009. Link to my intructable is https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-a-CLL-from-a-dead-CFL/I also taken part in contest Get The LED Out. Today while I was browsing entries for that contest, I found an entry which is a COPY of my intructable. Link to that instructable is https://www.instructables.com/id/COMPACT-LED-LIGHT/Only some differences are there in both instructables. That person submitted instructable on 11th June so it indicates it might be a copy of my instructable.I wonder how judges allowed that intructable to enter in contest.What to do now?

Posted by electrosam 9 years ago


Is Ikea the only place that recycles incandescent light bulbs as well?

CFL bulbs need to be recycled properly due to mercury content, and there are many places: Park districts, hardware stores, Ikea, etc. that recycle CFL bulbs. However, I haven't found any place that recycles incandescent bulbs, I searched online and they say, they don't contain any toxic chemicals and can be thrown in trash and not curbside recycling. However can't the glass be reused to make new bulbs? I am sure they can reuse the glass, and the filament is probably too hard to recycle but the glass could be. I know Ikea recycles incandescent bulbs as well, but why aren't there any other companies that do? Also LED bulbs, I guess dead LED bulbs can either be returned to manufacturer if it has warranty, or in electronic recycle.

Posted by ADRIANT28 1 year ago


Whippy Light: For Greens Who Like to Blind Themselves

This clever light fixture takes the shape of the CFL and manages to incorporate it very well. Of course, the problem is that this only looks good when it's not lit. Turning ti on to, say, light the room will quickly turn this from a conversation piece into a bright nuisance.Nice idea, tho. Link

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


I Need Some Lighting Help

I've hit a little speed bump. I need a bright, preferably diffused, soft white light for high speed videography. It cannot be florescent or a CFL (see why below). I can't seem to find any lights that fit these standards that aren't florescent, but I know they exist. Can you help me find a suitable light?

Posted by Spl1nt3rC3ll 9 years ago


powering my broken lcd tv

I have a busted lcd tv that the backlighting still works but i would like to get rid of stock power supply and input box. In essence make it into a light table. The plug that powers the inverter for the CFLs has 9 wires 5 red 4 black and is marked 24v. now here comes the crazy question can i wire in a 24v adapter with a simple on/off switch. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Posted by modzero556 7 years ago


New LED lightbulbs shine light in all directions

GE is going to be releasing a new LED lightbulb early next year that shines light in all directions, like a normal bulb, instead of one direction like they do now. The bulb will use 9 watts and shine as much light as a 40-watt incandescent. It will also last for 17 years. The drawback is the cost, which will be $40-$50, but it does provide an efficient lighting option for those who don't like the light from CFLs. No word about the blades on the side, however. GE Unveils New Omnidirection LED Bulb That Will Last 17 Years

Posted by fungus amungus 8 years ago


Light Bulb Lamps

Oh what to do with the light bulb now that you're basking in the efficient glow of your CFLs? Well, you could convert them into these light bulb lamps as Sergio Silva has done. It's a pretty sweet item with neodymium magnets holding them in place on an included acrylic plate with embedded bits of steel.However, the price tag is $650 for the set which is pretty flippin' ridiculous for what can be remade with scrap and $10 of materials, if that. To be fair, the light bulbs Silva makes are sturdier than the regular item, are all made by the original artist, and are limited to a run of 66. So you're buying some design-y street cred before they get knocked off and sold for one-tenth the price. Linkvia bbgadgets

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Circuit Diagram for LED bulb running on 120V AC

I have been watching a lot of YouTube videos of building your own LED bulb using a scrap CFL bulb. Since I have watched a lot of those videos, I want to build one. However, almost all of those videos are about making one that runs on 240V AC, and where I live I use 120V AC. Take this video for an example: I also noticed that in that circuit diagram, there is a 5th diode that is unnecessary. So I want to build an LED bulb similar to that one in the video above. But I am not so good with electricity, so I am not so sure how I can modify the circuit so that it will run with 120V AC instead of 240V. Can someone help me with this?

Posted by ADRIANT28 1 year ago


Help Identifying unknown Transformer

Hello I got this transformer from an old ups, there are four wires on the primary side black, blue, green , yellow and two on the secondary red and blue. This transformer used to charge 12v 7.5ah battery also converts it back to 220V in backup mode. Tried testing its output and got this (Mains 220V) Black to ground Blue to mains-> 7.9v on secondary Green->5.5v Yellow->6.5v Connecting Blue and Green to mains and it was a shot circuit and blown my fuse. I want to use this for making a decent power supply 12v+ output, is this possible? I also saw this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mc4GZM-kFUY&hd;=1 The guy is using his ups transformer for generating hv to power cfl using tip122, i am not sure how to do this using my transformer. I need to make use of this transformer somehow, otherwise its just eating dust at my home.

Posted by Clarkdale44 4 years ago


I want to make this lamp, please help!

WARNING: Mechanically inexperienced Newbie post below. Your patience is appreciated. :)Some of you may have seen this lamp online somewhere:http://www.hulgerisation.com/?page_id=60I'd like to try and make a lamp that works like this. As mentioned above, my experience is virtually non-existent when it comes to taking machines apart and hacking into them, but I possess a decent amount of common sense, and I'm pretty handy when it comes to tools. I'd like this to be my first project of this type. It seems simple enough: take a lamp base, a clock spring and a dynamo flashlight aaaand.... then what? Okay, so maybe it's not so simple. But to some of you, I'm sure it's probably a piece of cake, right? So if you've got the time and would like to explain how to do this, I'd truly appreciate your help.I found this instructable to be informative, https://www.instructables.com/id/The-Wind-up-Headboard-Reading-Light/but ultimately, it's not what I'm looking for. The key is the key for me with this lamp. It is visually appealing to me. Secondly, I would like lighting component to be that of a standard lamp- incandescent or CFL. If anyone has some kindly advice to offer, I would truly appreciate it. Thank you for reading!

Posted by elissam 10 years ago


Troubling Flyback Transformer Pins

Hello,       I'd like to request someone to share their knowledge about their "flyback" knowledge or experiences with me since I'm having trouble finding the primary coil pins with my flyback transformer. I'm constructing my own HV power supply and I decided to go through this tutorial.       I've read much on the web and found the 0v output pin of my flyback. The problem is .. I couldn't find the primary and secondary since I'm using an analog multimeter and the tutorials on the web are all digital..       When I test the pins with my multimeter set to ohm range of x1, I do not get a pair of 1 ohm pins but instead I got the result of "Continuity" when I test on following pins, they seems to be connected but none of the pins show to 1 ohm.. and thus I've adjust the Ohm Adjustment. The results are Continuity 1 : 1,2,6,8 Continuity 2 : 3,4,7,10 No Continuity: 5,9 Pin no 5 is 0v output..  I've attached the pin number diagram at photos... my drawing and actual pins.. Have you got any idea to find out the primary coil? I've also attach my driver from CFL.. Thanks

Posted by 3 years ago


SAD sunrise clock, led bulb mod?

I suffer with SAD and a sunrise clock helps a lot getting up in the mornings and winding down at night. I have one similar to this It uses ses 14 bulbs, currently using halogen 42W but these don't last long and I managed to blow one closing a drawer! So, I'm looking for a way to use 10 to 20W leds  but obviously, given its UK mains voltage that does the timed dimming, finding a suitable LED driver is difficult. There are a few out there but I've no idea which ones will work as it need it to. Also, the only commercially available dimmable led bulbs are e27 fit only, very expensive and only 12W, around 400 lumens. I need at least 600. Also the more the better. Looking to use 6400K or higher colour, as the higher temp colours are proven to be better for SAD. I can make electronic circuits and have hacked together/repaired plenty of stuff. I would rather build something than buy as I don't have £££ to spend! Does anybody have any ideas to help me get started? I'm also looking to replace my SAD bulbs, currently 85W cfls with LEDS as well.

Posted by kristyon 6 years ago


Have Materials, Need Ideas

I have Some materials that i just need to either figure out something to do with or, take apart and figure out how they work, or even trade for something you have... Here is a list of things I have that I want to make something with: - 1 A/C fan motor - 2 return air motors, fan assemblies, housings, and capacitors, - 100 feet of insulated copper wiring (3 wires) - capcitors resistors and high heat wires from about a dozen CFL bulbs - 300 feet +/- of telephone wiring - 1 Black and Decker 1970's? model circular saw, works but not as good as my new one - various electrical terminals - Various lengths/thicknesses of wood scraps - 100 feet speaker wire - 2 dozen led bulbs for automotive use (12v) - 12 Solar garden lights, I dont want to jst stick them in the ground -... the list goes on... anybody have any ideas of what I can make using some of this stuff? I was thinking about some sort of air delivery system for outdoor use... or something to do with a garden, or.......

Posted by ZaneEricB 4 years ago


(newsletter) Vampire Pie, Viking Spoon, Chocolate Sauce...

Aug 21, 2008 Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); } Welcome back! Check out the winners of the RoboGames Robot Contest and the Pie Contest. Learn how build our future robot overlords and bake some excellent pies!Upcoming...Feeling crafty? Get a head start on our upcoming Fabergé Egg and Craft Skills contests, and don't forget to take lots of great pictures. We're also putting together the biggest and best Halloween contest ever! October will be here soon, so start working on an elaborate costume and creepy decorations! Automated Answering System by randofo Awesome Chocolate Sauce by jofish USB Coil Cable by Plusea Surrealist Human Hand Stick Shifter! by stasterisk Meet the new robot overlords Life is sweeter with these desserts Homemade Shot/Grit Blasting Cabinet by kington99 Bright Idea Shades for CFLs by sjolly Desktop Scroll Wheel and Volume Control! by whatsisface How To Make A Vampie by thegirlwithacurl mini USB powered Tiffany Lamp by KaptinScarlet Rainbow Cheesecake by Tolstoi78 CCD Eyepiece for Binoculars by Kajnjaps Make a wooden spoon, the viking way by morfmir Get ready for the playa! Simple Xbox 360 Rapid Fire Mod by btop Blueberry And Apricot Pie In A Skillet!! by Forkable Build A Stereo Tube Amp by thobson The Handsewn Sprits'l by notjustsomeone Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup2","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); }

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Joule robber - a better joule thief....

I had a look at some of our 'ibles for the famous Joule Thief circuit. While checking a few of the creations and checking their performance I noticed a massive flaw: Only LED's with very low power consumptions can be used. After some trial and error I was able to create a slightly modified version that not only lights white and blue 5mm LED's but also the very powerful Cree Led's - the later would require a suitable transistor to handle the load. I only used a salvaged BC556 transistor, so the LED starts working at around 0.5V, brightness is adjustable within certain limits to cater for the battery state. So instead of using a limited circuit that basically just doubles the input voltage with the focus of extreme low power consumption, my circuit is aimed on single cell battery lamps that might need more power. Using a very low voltage transistor with minimal losses would still provide a power source for batteries that are under 0.5V, while using a bigger transistor like Tip142 or 2N3055 and a modified transformer can drive a CFL lamp from two AA batteries, single cell if you don't mind a warm transistor. Biggest improvement however is that I don't use a toroid core, which makes winding so much easier :) I am not too good in drawing circuits and prefer the direct solder method for my prototypes but if there interest I would take the time to make some pics and draw a circuit for an Instructable. But with so many similar circuits already out there I wanted to get some feedback first.

Posted by Downunder35m 4 years ago


(newsletter) Cheap Screenprinting, Bike Boombox, Pi Day...

Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); } We're now running THREE awesome contests, so get to work on your Instructables! Burning Questions is back with a vengeance. Answer our questions and win the love of thousands, or at least a spiffy new t-shirt! ThinkGeek Hacks Contest is now open for those of you who enjoy modifying the things you buy. Hack or modify anything from ThinkGeek and win a $250 gift certificate!Epilog Challenge is still open for entries. Enter your project with a green twist for a chance to win an Epilog Zing laser cutter or a gift certificate from Ponoko!Klutz Rubber Band-Powered Contest is almost open for your rubber band-powered contraptions! Win cool books from Klutz! Pi Day Guide Screenprint for Less Than $10 Make a Soil Blocker Build a Music Studio in an Apartment Win a laser cutter! Stretch, twist, and power something cool! (almost open) Build a Bike Boom Box Steampunk Clockwork Piston Turn a 300 Watt Lamp into a 20 Watt CFL Reconstructive Surgery for a Suitcase Get a free Expo Pass or save 35% on Conference registrations for Web 2.0 Expo San Francisco! Featured questions from our new Answers section: How do I build an audio amplifier circuit?Is there an affordable way to wireless stream audio from my laptop to my speakers? Oobleck: Gooey Science Experiment Build an Inexpensive Ikea NAS Make an Automatic Plant Light Spraygun 101 Let your geekiness shine! Get your green ready! Master a Perfect Inline Wire Splice Greenhouse From Old Windows Optical Illusion - Mysterious Black Dots Three Part Clock Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); }

Posted by fungus amungus 9 years ago


incandescent light flicker hacks

There are 2 hacks with incandescent lights that make flickering effect. may be usefull for some haloween stuff here is the most basic description. if you build it be carefull in fire safety - some stuff may overheat and blast / catch fire. use non flammable boxes if needed. starters and diodes may explode if connected incorrectly - always protect your eyes do not do any of the hacks with CFLs - they are for incandescents only. they may work with LED lights depending on other components in the ciruit and the amount of current (if there are capacitor / induction / electronics / transformer in the LED circuit then dont do it) hack 1 - slow flicker (i saw it somewhere on instructables before) connect the incan in series with fluorescent lamp starter (the neon discharge type) you may connect 2 starters in series. i'd expect longer outages this way. if they dont light (not enough voltage) then use the starters designed for 2 x 18 W fluorescents. warnings dont connect the starter (or series of 2 or more starters) directly across the ac source. the starters will blow immediately and may explode. check that in any possible path through the starters there is an incan light dont connect stuff in parallel unless you really know what you do. lights connected in parallel take the sum of the currents they take on their own - anything more than 1 light is too much for a starter (or any amount of starters in series - each gets all the current) part 2 - fast 50 Hz flicker connect the lamp in series with an 1N4007 diode. the diode blocks 1/2 of the ac wave and makes some light flicker. seen best in low watt lamps with thinner filament (with less thermal capacity) diode may be used together with starter to combine the effects this hack is used widely in heating appliances that have 2 heat settings. in the lower one they are connected thru a diode

Posted by 11010010110 10 years ago


Grid Tie and Induction Motors

Yes, I know it's nearly 3am on the east coast... but and idea struck me. So the idea is to feed small amounts of mechanical power into the power grid. Not necessarily run the meter backwards, but supplement power consumption.I've researched grid tie inverters - which are very expensive. For those wondering, a grid tie inverter is feeds mains power back into the grid by syncing phase angle and phase (no dead shorts :) ) and applying slightly higher voltage. They are very efficient and really not within a college student experiment budget :pSo I was thinking... Rather than go from mechanical to DC to AC to grid - go from mechanical to AC to grid VIA an induction motor. As a proof of concept, use a DC motor + battery to turn an induction motor. Plugged into the grid, in theory, should apply current. Oh, but the phase you say? How do you prevent a dead short?"I've thought of this -- before applying mechanical power - have the grid bring the induction motor up to speed. Then try to turn faster (apply a torque) with the DC motor, for example. In theory, the amount of extra power put into the grid will be related to the slip angle of the motor - which will also control the speed of the input (so you can't go over speed by too much).Keep in mind that this whole battery business is just a proof of concept sort of thing - I'm not talking perpetual motion or any hohaa craziness. In the end, the final mechanical input will be around 200 watts. I expect this to be very low efficiency (likely 50%ish), 100W isn't an answer to the energy issues - but it's an experiment. It's also not going to come even close to driving the meter backwards, but it should run (as supplement) my laptop + two to three 13w CFL's :DI think the theory is feasible -- the inspiration comes from flywheel driven UPS systems. An induction motor is driven while mains power is on to keep a flywheel in motion. When the power goes out, the FW drives the motor and feeds to local grid.I'm thinking of using a "low" rpm induction motor.... If I recall, ceiling fans are 16 pole? So that's 60Hz2*2/16=450rpm... Add ceiling fan motor to the list of things to hunt for :) Looking at the one above my head, it looks like it even has a nice bolt pattern for some sort of pulley shenanigans :DCan someone either throw some ice water on me and slap me for being an idiot -- or let me know if I've found a boat to Valhalla.Oh, and my apologies for dancing around the "mechanical input" details.... There's a reason for this, I promise :) In any case, insight and information is appreciated :)

Posted by trebuchet03 11 years ago