Will conductive glue work on low-voltage high-current applications?

Will conductive glue work on a 5v circuit with up to 2 amps of power running through it? if so, it would be so much easier for me to surface solder chips and such. Thanks!

Question by astroboy907 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Can someone help me make a conductive (resisitive) paste?

I need to make heater using about 6K resistance working off the mains vltage of 240V ac (i.e., about 40mA or 10Watts). Is it possible to make a resistive paste perhaps using graphite and some glue (pl suggest glue) for this application? I can then screen print the paste on the surface to be heated. The result needs to be consistent over about 200 pcs. Thanx in advance.

Question by n6080 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


soldering alternatives - conductive glue, soldering paste ...?

------------------------------------------------------------ SOLDERING ALTERNATIVES - CONDUCTIVE GLUE/SOLDERING PASTE ... ? i am looking for a reliable, not-too-expensive alternative for soldering connections & found conductive glue/paste products as listed in the following; .... i assume that there is nothing that really replaces soldering but would like to know, if you probably tested any of these or may recommend a specific product suitable for "sticking" components onto pcb's ... any hint is highly appreciated! ------------------------------------------------------------ PRODUCTS http://de.rs-online.com/web/c/?searchTerm=loet+paste&sra;=oss solder paste/solder glue ... based on silver http://www.ponoko.com/make-and-sell/show-hardware/2201-a-solder-paste-50g-leaded?source_node=ponoko_united_states#main-image solder paste ... needs heat to harden out, cheaper than silver based glue http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/tools/b70c/ "Wire Glue" ... does not need heat to harden out, based on graphite powder, cheapest of all i found so far https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-Conductive-Glue-and-Glue-a-Circuit/ ... selfmade, based on graphite powder ------------------------------------------------------------ TESTS/RATINGS/COMMENTS http://forums.reprap.org/read.php?70,21723 "Wire Glue" ... it's consistence might be too brittle, using additional expoxy might make up with this issue

Question by marc_is_curious 7 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


How can i make a glass slide conductive for organic solar cell?

Can copper wire cut into very small pieces mixed with glue work? 

Question by Spidewman 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Does hot glue work to enforce/protect my soldering joints/points? Answered

I made a custom drone and I want to protect the soldering joints on the power distribution board.  And it still needs to work after hotglue-ing all of it haha.

Question by DennisK20 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


Wire Glue, Solder Free Fun.

Well, I'm not very good at soldering, for one simple reason, I've not done alot of it since my school days.This kind of solution is perfect for someone like me, who often only needs a simple led circuit to hook up inside a prop.It would save me having to get the soldering iron out, and could easily be an advantage when getting circuits into strange shapes.Carbon is one of our favorite elements. It makes diamonds, it makes all known life possible, and it makes pencils (and who doesn't love pencils?) Also, it seems that carbon fullerenes (buckeyballs, nanotubes, etc) are going to do a lot in our future. Time to bring a little of that microcarbon goodness into your home and make it work for you now. "Wire Glue" Conductive Glue uses microcarbon technology to make a glue that also conducts electricity.Via Thinkgeek

Topic by gmjhowe 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Circuits and Circuitboards

I would like to make circuits using paper and a conductive ink pen, but there's not way to "attach" the components to the paper. I'm looking for a conductive glue, like epoxy or super-glue, I can apply directly to the point of contact between the paper and the component. Can anyone suggest a product, or how to make such an item? Thanks, Kevin

Topic by kevin.t.stein.3 1 year ago


Need help thinking of something conductive and magnetic? Answered

I am trying to attach some led lights under a shelf and also need to make them removeable, i need to find something that is conductive as well as magnetic. My original idea was to just get some small nickel or ? plated screws and just wrap wire around them and screw them in but not completely sure of that idea working. I already made the lights and have small neodymium magnets that im going to attach to them but just need some ideas of what to use for under the shelf....thanks Ive thought of clay, or glue and other stuff but idk. im putting 4 lights up. and there will be a switch to shut off power to the material when not in use so there's no safety issues.

Question by ARGMISTER 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Is it possible to use old cassette tape's and/or floppy disk's "film" to make circuit boards?

Is the magnetic film inside these old media conductive enough to replace the copper, and if so, would it be feasible to glue strips of tape/disk onto some plastic or cardboard and then attach (?melting/soldering?) electronic components to it?

Topic by trocatintas 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Print Circuit Boards with Squink

From kick starter page: Create circuit boards in minutes, from home, at the cost of a cup of coffee - Squink prints conductive ink and assembles your circuit. Atmel had posted about a new device called "Squink". What it does is print a circuit board on paper (or anything flat like glass), applies conductive glue to the contacts, and automatically places your components on the board for you! They have a kick starter here:  https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/botfactory/squink-the-personal-electronic-circuit-factory but I am 13 and cannot fund it. I believe this device will be found in the home of makers all over, and I think spreading the word will help these people. So please head to the page and fund/share the word!

Topic by DELETED_JesusGeek 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Solder with plastic?

I have been soldering veeeery small devices lately and I wanted to ask the community if there are any other cheap options such as a voltage-conductive polymer (with good conductivity), I know that it may not be possible for it to have the same characteristics but soldering with glue would be so much easier, I may sound silly but it may exist already... I found this: "silver conductive epoxy" my question still lingers: Is there a true solder replacement?

Topic by dejabox 11 years ago


Solder with plastic?

I have been soldering veeeery small devices lately and I wanted to ask the community if there are any other cheap options such as a voltage-conductive polymer (with good conductivity), I know that it may not be possible for it to have the same characteristics but soldering with glue would be so much easier, I may sound silly but it may exist already... I found this: "silver conductive epoxy" my question still lingers: Is there a true solder replacement?

Topic by dejabox 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


push button contacts fail

Hi, i disassembled my full-automated coffeemachine as the push buttons for programs failed. The buttons are a line of rubber and the contacts on the platine are toothed while each rubber contact got tiny plates that bridge the contacts on the platine. I guess that the contact plates lack of conductivity - any suggestions what i can do to improve the conductivity? I thought bout buying contact foil and glue it over the rubber contacts, but i don't know, if this is the best solution.

Topic by Luziviech 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


What do Nokia use to glue LCD/ main board cables with ?

Opening a Nokia 1661 mobile phone (its an uber-cheap UK phone ) to replace the LCD, I have the usual orangey flex PCB material off the LCD, basically GLUED to the mating surface on the main  PCB. The old display tails peeled off, but I can't identify the strange grey glue they used to mate the connections. Has anyone any ideas ? It almost looks like partially cooked solder paste, but that would conduct all over, and I can't see any isolation. Its not "rubbery" that I can tell. Thanks Steve

Question by steveastrouk 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Bouncing PC! How to secure PCI/PCIe cards and keep cables in place?

I have a desktop PC with a lot of components including a large number of PCI/PCIe cards. The problem I have is that the machine is regularly transported long distances by a variety of means, including rail, road and sea. What happens is that the (often quite generous) jars and jolts of the journey cause cables to fall out and cards to rise out of their slots at the unsecured end. Each time I have to open everything up and reseat everything. If the machine arrives somewhere where I'm not, it can't be used until I arrive. I've gotten around the problem of SATA cables falling out by purchasing cables that clip into place rather than just flap about in the usual fashion. What I don't know how to do is secure ribbon cables, audio cables, cards and the like.  Because of various constraints: - I can't use plastic zip ties (there's nowhere to secure them) - I can't use brackets (the cards are half height) - I can't swap out or modify the chassis The only option appears to be glue. Old fashioned sticky stuff. Thing is, I've read an awful lot of things on the web and while this question gets asked a fair amount there is no consensus. Some people say to use a conducting type (which seems plain idiotic, given that if applied to a PCI interface it'll short out), and others say to use a glue gun (which might introduce problems with regard to the heat and chemicals). The only suggestion that made sense was a silicon sealant from Loctite designed specifically for circuit boards - Tempflex - but there's almost no information about it and the word 'Temp' makes me concerned it's just a makeshift solution (no pun intended). It's also really too expensive to buy a tube and only then discover it won't work. Does anyone have any thoughts?

Topic by 10,000 Angry Vegans 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


How do I use static flocking on non-metallic miniatures?

For a tabletop project, I would like to add flocking to some of my bigger, furred miniatures (think giant minotaurs or the like). For this, I would like to buy a flock applicator, but I would like to know what sort of technique I should use before I start. The problem that I am seeing, however, is not having enough control on which direction the flock should go and applying them selectively on the model rather than all over and creating a kind of gradient. There's a few ways I could see this working; I buy a static flock applicator and I fix my miniature to hover above an electrostatic surface and I apply the flock from the directions that I would like the fur to go unto surfaces of glue. Another way that I could see this working is if I apply some kind of conductive layer to the miniature underneath the glue, allowing me to make the miniature itself electrostatic, without having to apply all of the fur of the entire model in one go. I'd hate to leave needle pricks through my model. Does anyone have any suggestions...?

Question by Pretender 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


new type of search suggestion

Hi, it's me fidgety2. I am finally on summer break and have some free time on my hands. Considering I am a loyal devotee of instructables I want to get building except I have one problem. All of the instructables I want to do require things I do not have. For example, I do not have any cameras of the disposable nature. Or for conductive glue. I don't have graphite and being on a limited budget I can't go out and buy the necessasary items inorder to create these amazing instructables. So therefore I would like to suggest that a new search is created called the materials search. This search would be just like any other search on instructables only you could put in a material such as iron filings and all instructables using iron fillings would be the result. Now this would be as easy to integrate into the instructables website as the keyword(s) that the instructable makers type in. I believe that this will be a great asset to the instructables community. Thankyou, Fidgety2

Topic by fidgety2 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


2008 Instructables and Universal Laser Cutter Contest Finalists

The winner has been announced here!Instructables and [www.ulsinc.com Universal Laser] are happy to announce the 14 finalists in the Laser Cutter Contest. Ten of the finalists were selected by judges at Instructables.com. The other four finalists were the Instructables that had the two highest pageviews or ratings as of Monday morning, Jan. 7.The authors of these Instructables are all in the running to win a VersaLaser worth over $15,000. Now we turn the voting over to you. Click on the "Vote!" buttons below the Instructables to submit your vote and help decide who wins the grand prize. You can vote for more than one Instructable and voting closes Jan. 31. Judge-selected Finalists(in alphabetical order) Autonomous Foosball Table Build a Greenland Kayak Build a Wind Harp! Build yourself a portable home - a mongolian yurt Extreme Business Cards Giant Fresnel Lens Deathray How I built a carbon bike frame at home (and a bamboo frame too) How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) Laser cutter, start slicing stuff for under 50 dollars Laser Image Projector Ratings and Pageviews Finalists How to Make a TRON Style Lamp: The MADYLIGHT How to build a sit down driving arcade cabinet The Spiral Data Tato -- A Curiously Complex Origami CD Case Blu-Ray Laser Phaser! Second Place The authors of these Instructables win a robot t-shirt and a laser-etched plaque. Listed in alphabetical order. 30 minute USB microscope The Ambience Enhancer Autonomous, Wirelessly Controlled Hovercraft Conductive Glue And Conductive Thread: Make an LED Display and Fabric Circuit That Rolls Up. Cool Wave Ring Dollar Store Parabolic Mic Handcut inlay A Home Power Plant - Wind Power Generator Revised How to Make a Color-Changing Lighted Faux Fur Scarf How to make a pair of Angel Wings How to Make an OAWR (Obstacle Avoiding Walking Robot) Make DIY Vanilla Extract "Quicksilver" Retro-Future Scooter from appliances and scrap metal Solid Wood Digital Clock The Stirling Engine, absorb energy from candles, coffee, and more! Squishy Breast Stress Relief Toy TiggerBot II Robot Tube Amp Rebuild (and Mod) U-Disp - The Digg (tm) display (Open Source)Wooden Gear ClockThank you to all the judges: ewilhelm, jesse.hensel, PT, randofo, intoon, canida, noahw, stasterisk, fungus amungus, lebowski, T3h_Muffinator, and bofthem.

Topic by fungus amungus 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Build your own demo of a particle accelerator!

This was originally posted by an I'bles user in the "Feedback" forum. I've suggested he repost his questions under Science, and hope to answer them there. In the mean time, this video from the March 2008 issue of Symmetry Magazine (a joint SLAC/Fermilab publication) is really cute. The original article's video includes a bunch of related items which are worth checking out themselves. The high voltage (at least 50kV, I think) DC supply needs to be pretty stable -- you can't just throw a rectifier bridge onto a wall cord, but other than that, the project would be extremely simple to build. I've sent Dr. Johnson an e-mail to see if I can get more detailed specs. Update 4 Jan 2009: Todd Johnson and I have exchanged a couple of e-mails about this project (d**n, I love the collegiality of the scientific world!). For the DC power supply, he used a potted module (i.e., an enclosed unit with no accessible or dangerous components) designed for use in a negative ion generator (like the "Ionic Breeze"). He bought the unit surpus from http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G9695 . The bowl you see in the video was custom made from acrylic. I thought something like a Pyrex mixing bowl would work, but the "corner" where the flat base joins the spherical body introduces a barrier to the ball doing what it should do. The coating on the ping-pong ball is something called http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G16133 "wire glue"], touted as a substitute for solder. For this project, he covered the conductive paint with some clear Krylon for protection. Dr. Johnson and I are discussing the possibility of collaborating on an Instructable for this project. As a result of the video publicity, he's already gotten some inquiries on how to build it, so this would be an appropriate venue. He has a substantial amount of performance data and physics background on the device, which we will include in the ultimate publication.

Topic by kelseymh 10 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Venus Zine Craft-off Contest

Got a clever handmade gift idea? Does it cost less than $40 to produce? Want to share your project with the world? If you answered yes to these questions, you should totally enter Venus Zine’s 4th Annual Craft-Off Contest, a competition pitting the craftiest in the land against one another to come up with the best, most creative, most fantabulous DIY creations imaginable ... on a budget.Winners will be chosen from the submissions received, and the best projects will be featured in the winter 2008–2009 issue of Venus Zine, on newsstands December 1. Winners will receive a four-issue subscription to Venus Zine — additional prizes to be announced (keep checking back!). Winners will be featured fancy pants–style in the magazine (photo and bio and all) in addition to venuszine.com.RULES SHMULES- Your project should be an innovative, unusual creation using materials whose total cost does not exceed $40. We’re looking for jewelry, clothing, home décor, furniture, bags, accessories, bath and body works, pet goodies, and whatever else you can think of. Try to come up with unexpected uses for objects, or put a new spin on an old favorite. Surprise us with your boundless creativity. The mission is to create gifts to give during the holiday season, but your project doesn’t need to be holiday-themed.- Your entry consists of two parts:1. Digital photographs of your project: We will not actually run your photos, so don’t worry about doing a high-tech photo shoot. Instead, we will conduct our own photo shoot for the magazine.2. A set of instructions for assembling it. How-tos should be concise but sufficiently detailed so that Venus Zine readers may replicate your work. Please include a materials list that gives the approximate cost of each material.- Any Venus Zine reader is welcome to participate, whether you’re a DIY businessperson or just have a flair for the crafty. Unfortunately, if you’re related to a Venus Zine staffer, you cannot apply. (You know how it goes – we wouldn’t want it to look like we’re biased.)HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR BRILLIANT IDEA- E-mail jpegs of your Craft-off Contest submission along with how-to instructions to craftoff@venuszine.com .- All entries must be received by September 18, 2008, to be considered. We will notify you if you are a winner.- You may submit up to five projects.Ladies and gentlemen, fire up your glue guns, rev up your sewing machines, and show us what you’re made of!PRIZESInterested in applying to be a Craft-off Contest prize sponsor? Get in touch with Anne Brindle at anne@venuszine.com for details. Keep checking back! Prizes will be announced soon.

Topic by VenusZine 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Laser Cutter Contest Winners!

It is with great pleasure that I announce the winner of the Laser Cutter Contest:Stuart.Mcfarlan for How to Make a Three Axis CNC Machine (Cheaply and Easily)Be sure to check out Stuart.Mcfarlan's plans for the Laser Cutter.Congratulations to all the finalists who will receive a Laser-etched Instructables Leatherman Juice S2 and an Instructables t-shirt for their simply amazing work:crabfu for Steam Turbine Tankdave spencer for erupting Volcano Birthday CakeHonus for How to make a Green Lantern ring- including a glowing version!jabroutin for personal powerPlantjeffkobi for Retro Hi-Fi ProjectKasey for Compubeaver --> How to case-mod a beaver - in 29 easy steps!lkrasnow for Precision Puzzlemaking Primer -- Volume 1mikejedw for Pringles Wind Turbine (Pleech) - Version One mydian_nightshade forFurniture grade cocktail arcade cabinetmzed for Low-cost Spherical Speaker Array nemomatic for Giant Squid kinetic sculpture from found materialsorthonormal_basis_of_evil for EMP shopping cart lockertalbotron22 for DIY Kitty Crack: ultra-potent catnip extract turkey tek for Interactive Multitouch DisplayWe had planned to select 20 second place winners, but just couldn't narrow the field, so we're awarding 25 second place winners, who will receive Instructables t-shirts! They are:$30 High-Speed PCB Drill Press by lancandy$60 Laser Engraver / Cutter by cgoshBreath powered USB charger by jmengelBuild a Tetris DVD (or book) shelf by odecom5Capture the Ethereal Beauty of Everyday Objects Using Polarized Light. by Tool Using AnimalCO2 laser that cuts sheet metal by owhiteCosmic Light With LEDs Embedded in Resin by technoplastiqueDuck Cam Decoy by RoadstarElectromagnetic Floater by J_HodgieFine Silver (99.9% pure) Popcorn Pendant! by roughtyperHan Solo in carbonite chocolate bar! by FreakCitySFLaptop Converted to 2nd Monitor by punish3rMake a wall avoiding Robot! a collaboration led by Brandon121233Make Conductive Glue and Glue a Circuit by mikey77Make rope out of dead plants -- with no tools a collaboration led by phyzomeMod a toaster and have retro art toast for breakfast by 5VoltMotherboard PCB Bracelet by llama13Portable Water resistant LED Picnic Blanket with hard center serving surface! by pointcloudStart a Guerrilla Drive-in by plusbryanThe Ice Bulb by mandrakeThe Intimate Video Light/ Handheld photograpy light. by curve12The One, The Only COTTON CANDY MACHINE! by T3h_MuffinatorTheater Effects: Gunshot Wounds by TrumpetNeelUse a Vacuum cleaner to build your own Skateboard by gregorylavoieWire Scorpion by OniToraAll the winners should watch for a personal message from us for prize claiming instructions.With so many excellent entries, and with each of them being at the top of their game in some different aspect, the judging was extremely difficult. We had help juding from a large number of users including 5Volt, african_andy187, Albetcha, BobbyMike, CameronSS, canida, daenris, drinkmorecoffee, ewilhelm, fungus amungus, herrozerro, ian, imanalchemist, J_Hodgie, jamesh, jesse.hensel, jessyratfink, jmengel, Kiteman, LasVegas, lebowski, lennyb, llama13, lothotrity, momo!, nagutron, nak, noahw, olddaddycrane, pt, Randofo, Robyntheslug, royalestel, ryzellon, Sam Noyoun, saul, Sedgewick17, sheekgeek, stasterisk, steven07, T3h_Muffinator, technick29, Tetranitrate, Tool Using Animal, trebuchet03, trialex, x9a, zieak, and Zujus. For more information on how we judged, check here.The entries submitted to this contest exceeded all of my expectations. They are totally amazing in their quality, instructional value, uniqueness, and pure brilliance. It is my hope that everyone had a blast entering the contest and learned something useful, fun, or both. To me, the value of posting an Instructable is when someone makes a comment saying that I taught them something new, changed the way they looked at things, or inspired them to make something themselves (even if it's something totally different than my Instructable). Looking through the Instructables submitted to the contest and comments on the finalists' forum posts, it's clear that this is happening all over, and it makes me smile every time. Congratulations to all the winners! And, thanks to everyone that entered. Even if your Instructable didn't win a prize, I'm sure it has had a positive impact on someone's life and will continue to do so.

Topic by ewilhelm 11 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Graffiti artists replicate The Matrix on Instructables.com--and win $15,000 Universal Laser Cutter!

Instructables and Universal Laser are happy to announce that the incredibly creative Instructable, How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) has won the Grand Prize in the 2008 Instructables.com and Universal Laser Cutter Contest: a 40-watt VersaLaser laser cutter valued at over $15,000!Grand Prize Winner How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) provides an extremely detailed Instructables tutorial on how to build a cheap, portable special-effects rig to create "bullet-time" animations--a technique, popularized in The Matrix movies, where the audience's point-of-view moves around the scene at normal speed while the action on screen is slowed down."We want to inspire great ideas and provide skills, tools, and shared know-how," Instructables CEO Eric Wilhelm explained. "This project represents exactly what we're trying to achieve with Instructables."The DIY Bullet Time Instructable was created and documented by the Graffiti Research Lab, an open-source urban art and communication collective supported by the Free Art & Technology Lab, a Brooklyn-based non-profit research lab creating work at the intersection of popular culture and the public domain."This will be the cornerstone of our new lab space," said GRL member fi5e. "A whole crew of creative people are really excited to put this thing to use! Thanks for helping us bring the VersaLaser to Brooklyn."The winner was chosen by votes from Instructables users and our panel of expert judges, who reviewed the 14 finalists drawn from a pool of over 600 entries. Congratulations to fi5e and everyone at the GRL - we know you'll really put the VersaLaser to work, and can't wait to see what great things you make! First Prize(in alphabetical order) Autonomous Foosball Table Blu-Ray Laser Phaser! Build a Greenland Kayak Build a Wind Harp! Build yourself a portable home - a mongolian yurt Extreme Business Cards Giant Fresnel Lens Deathray How I built a carbon bike frame at home (and a bamboo frame too) How to Make a TRON Style Lamp: The MADYLIGHT How to build a sit down driving arcade cabinet Laser cutter, start slicing stuff for under 50 dollars Laser Image Projector The Spiral Data Tato -- A Curiously Complex Origami CD Case Second Prize The authors of these Instructables win a robot t-shirt and a laser-etched plaque. Listed in alphabetical order. 30 minute USB microscope The Ambience Enhancer Autonomous, Wirelessly Controlled Hovercraft Conductive Glue And Conductive Thread: Make an LED Display and Fabric Circuit That Rolls Up. Cool Wave Ring Dollar Store Parabolic Mic Handcut inlay A Home Power Plant - Wind Power Generator Revised How to Make a Color-Changing Lighted Faux Fur Scarf How to make a pair of Angel Wings How to Make an OAWR (Obstacle Avoiding Walking Robot) Make DIY Vanilla Extract "Quicksilver" Retro-Future Scooter from appliances and scrap metal Solid Wood Digital Clock The Stirling Engine, absorb energy from candles, coffee, and more! Squishy Breast Stress Relief Toy TiggerBot II Robot Tube Amp Rebuild (and Mod) U-Disp - The Digg (tm) display (Open Source)Wooden Gear Clock Expert JudgesTo help us judge, we assembled an amazing team of expert designers, engineers, hackers, journalists, scientists, technologists, and other really smart people. They spent hours examining each of the finalists Instructables and helping us make a decision. We'd like to send a huge "Thank You" to each of our incredible judges. We couldn't have done it without you.Violet Blue (author, blogger, podcaster, columnist, and SRL vet)Gareth Branwyn (Contributing Editor, MAKE Magazine)Zoz Brooks (Host, of the upcoming TV Show Prototype This)Joe Brown (Editor, Wired Magazine)Colin Bulthaup (CTO of Potenco, co-founder Squid Labs) David Calkins (Co-founder of RoboGames) Julia Cosgrove (Deputy Editor, ReadyMade Magazine)Chris Csikszentmihalyi (Professor at the MIT Media Lab, Computing Culture Group)Simone Davalos (Co-founder of RoboGames) Lenore Edman (Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories)Dan Goldwater (Founder of monkeylectric, co-founder Squid Labs)Saul Griffith (President of Makani Power, co-founder Squid Labs, MacArthur Fellow)Duncan Haberly (Instructables)Matthew Hancher (NASA Researcher in the Intelligent Systems Division)Brian Lam (Editor, Gizmodo)Ed Lewis (Instructables)Jeffrey McGrew (Designer, Because We Can)Chuck Messer (Tackle Design, The Open Prosthetics Project, host of Discovery's Smash Lab)Megan Miller (Editor, PopSci)Jim Newton (Founder of TechShop)Quinn Norton (Journalist)Windell Oskay (Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories)David Pescovitz (BoingBoing, Institute for the Future, MAKE Magazine)Cloude Porteus (Instructables)Randy Sarafan (Instructables, Eyebeam Resident)Peter Semmelhack (Founder of Buglabs)Tyghe Trimble (News Editor, Discover Magazine)Noah Weinstein (Instructables)Eric Wilhelm (CEO of Instructables, co-founder Squid Labs)Dan Woods (Associate Publisher, MAKE Magazine) For the full information on how the winners were chosen, click here.

Topic by ewilhelm 11 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago