LHC Countdown

They have started the final countdown for the LHC.Some say that it will find the God particle.Others say that it will kill us all.I say hope for the best, but [http://instructables.com/community/Its-the-End-of-the-World-As-We-Know-It-.../ prepare for the worst.]For more information, look at these newer posts:More on the LHC Countdownand End of World One Step Closer. Or Not.

Posted by Tetranitrate 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


LHC Rap Video !!!

I found this on gizmdo, its a Rap Video filmed at the LHC which pretty-much sums up what there doing there.Watch the video its funny and informative ! Doubble WHAMMY ! anchorman referenceIf you want to sing along you can find the lyrics here, along with video download linkshttps://www.msu.edu/~mcalpin9/lhc_rap/largehadron.htmlOh and you can donate some of your computers downtime to help the guys at LHC do their calculations http://lhcathome.cern.ch/lhcathome/

Posted by =SMART= 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


More on the LHC Countdown

The Large Hadron Collider is indeed large: the underground particle accelerator is about 17 miles in circumference (it is circular). Located between France and Switzerland, the LHC is now almost ready to begin full-length particle accelerations. Researchers are attempting to collide protons together that are accelerate to 7 TeV (tera electron volts).Following Tetranitrate's first post, LHC Countdown, people have been looking for more information.Even More on the LHC from Kiteman, with more explanation.Here is a great set of pictures from Boston.com, showcasing all stages of production of the LHC.For a better visual understanding of how it works, take a look at this LHC animation from the official LHC web site.More general information from the LHC web site.As I like to say, this is large and in charge.

Posted by joshf 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


How to build the LHC

If you found the Instructable on operating the Large Hadron Collider a bit complex, Ian O'Neill has provided much simpler assembly and operating instructions. Thanks to Physics World for posting this where I could find it!

Posted by kelseymh 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


I'm looking forward to Kelseymh's next Instructable...

"How to Make a Universe" I'm making space in my shed this very weekend...

Posted by Kiteman 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


What is Kelseymh up to?

CELEBRATIONS have just finished at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, for the 50th anniversary of a milestone that had nothing to do with basic physics research. In October 1958, nuclear physicist William Higinbotham created one of the world's first video games, called Tennis for Two.Officially, his goal was to liven up displays at the lab's annual visitors' day, and in that he succeeded. Hundreds of people lined up to bat a glowing spot back and forth across the video screen of a common or garden laboratory oscilloscope.Unofficially, Feedback suspects he was really just goofing off on a slow day, or waiting around with nothing to do when the lab's particle accelerator was broken, being maintained or otherwise failing to deliver the goods. Higinbotham himself said the idea came to him while reading the manual for an early computer which could plot the course of a missile or a bouncing ball on an oscilloscope screen. He then designed suitable circuits and control boxes - Stone Age versions of today's joysticks - so that two players could bat an electronic ball to each other across the screen.The game was adapted for a larger screen, but eventually forgotten until 1982, when Creative Computing magazine heard about it and thought it might be the first video game. With the invention far enough behind for him not to worry about accounting for time wasted on the government payroll, Higinbotham claimed credit for Tennis for Two.Such primitive video games are old hat now, but hundreds of physicists including our own Kelseymh are still waiting for the completion of repairs to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. What might they be inventing this time, while sitting around twiddling their thumbs?New Scientist Article.Tennis For Two Simulator (untried by your correspondent)

Posted by Kiteman 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


A novel lunar clock

The Large Hadron Collider is so big that tidal effects cause its beam paths to distort, as the machinery bends. http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2012/06/07/is-the-moon-full-just-ask-the-lhc-operators/

Posted by steveastrouk 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


LHC fired up this morning

At 7:00 GMT this morning, engineers fired the first beam at the Large Hadron Collider.It worked on the first try.We're not dead.They didn't discover extra subatomic particles previously unknown to scienceyet.Pretty boring, really.Actually, apparently they had technical difficulties the night before-part of the cooling system (which keeps the magnets cool. Very cool. 1.9 degrees kelvin, to be exact.) failed. They worked on it and managed to fix it overnight though.Details via newscientist (includes video).Via guardian.co.uk

Posted by Lithium Rain 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Apologies in Advance

I've mentioned it before, but now is almost the time: I'm going to CERN on Monday, for most of the week. It's actually a professional development session (I'm supposed to be getting inspired to produce inspiring teaching materials), so it's not a jolly, honest. Anyhoo, bizarrely, in the birthplace of the internet*, wifi internet access is apparently quite unreliable there, so I may not be around as much as you are used to. I'll be spending the time in a days-long nerdgasm instead. (*it involved physicists being too lazy to cycle between work stations)

Posted by Kiteman 6 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


3D photo-tours of LHC and detectors on the Web!

New Scientist reported today on an online exhibit of 3D-navigable photographs of the LHC and associated experimental detectors. Very, very cool!Even more interesting are the bizarre anamorphic images which pop up when you navigate between the pages of the exhibit. These are apparently the originals from which the navigable pages themselves are generated.

Posted by kelseymh 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Large Hadron Collider's First Operation

The Large Hadron Collider has been tested on 10, September, 2008.Look here on Wikipedia if you don't know what a Large Hadron Collider is.Proton beams have already been injected into the first metres of the LHC, to test the injection process, but the first attempt to circulate beams all the way around the LHC will be on the official start up day. If everything proceeds according to plan the beam will circulate all the way around the 27 km long LHC. Over the following months the LHC scientists and engineers will commission the LHC, running beams at higher energy with the intention of beginning collisions, using relatively low energy (5TeV) beams, towards the end of 2008.Continued on this link...

Posted by Plasmana 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


The Large Hadron Collider: is it worth it?

The Large Hadron Collider(LHC) is to be unveiled this year. It is designed to solve the much talked about energy crisis, and hopes to do so, but can it be worth all of it? From Wikipedia- (On October 25, 2005, a technician, José Pereira Lages, was killed in the LHC tunnel when a crane load was accidentally dropped. The construction of LHC was approved in 1995 with a budget of 2.6 billion Swiss francs, with another 210 millionfrancs (€140 M) towards the cost of the experiments. However, cost over-runs, estimated in a major review in 2001 at around 480 million francs (€300 M) for the accelerator, and 50 million francs (€30 M) for the experiments, along with a reduction in CERN's budget, pushed the completion date from 2005 to April 2007.[14] 180 million francs (€120 M) of the cost increase have been due to the superconducting magnets. There were also engineering difficulties encountered while building the underground cavern for the Compact Muon Solenoid. In part this was due to faulty parts lent to CERN by fellow laboratories Argonne National Laboratory or Fermilab (home to the Tevatron, the world's largest particle accelerator until CERN finishes the Large Hadron Collider). [15] The total cost of the project is anticipated to be between US$5 and US$10 billion.[2] On March 27, 2007, there was an incident during a pressure test involving one of the LHC's inner triplet magnet assemblies provided by Fermilab and KEK. No people were injured, but a cryogenic magnet support broke. Fermilab director Pier Oddone stated 'In this case we are dumbfounded that we missed some very simple balance of forces.' This fault had been present in the original design, and remained during four engineering reviews over the following years.[41] Analysis revealed that its design, made as thin as possible for better insulation, was not strong enough to withstand the forces generated during pressure testing. Details are available in a statement from Fermilab, with which CERN is in agreement.[42][43])

Posted by BkrevWlevqe 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


The 5 Scientific Experiments Most Likely to End the World (Humor)

Let's face it, we really trust science. In fact, studies suggests that the vast majority of people will murder another human being, if a guy in a lab coat tells them it's OK.But surely in their insatiable curiosity and desire to put knowledge above all things, science would never, say, inadvertently set off a chain of events that lead to some sort of disaster that ended the world. Right?Well, here's five experiments that may prove us wrong.Slighty NSFW, as it cointains a few bad words, but this is hilarious!

Posted by Keith-Kid 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


End of World One Step Closer. Or Not.

A vast physics experiment - the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - reaches a key milestone this weekend ahead of an official start-up on 10 September.Engineers had previously brought a beam of protons - tiny, sub-atomic particles - to the "doorstep" of the LHC.On 9 August, protons will be piped through LHC magnets for the first time.The most powerful physics experiment ever built, the LHC will re-create the conditions present in the Universe just after the Big Bang.This last sentence is the one that's caused a little panic amongst certain groups of the population - they are convinced that the experiment will create miniature black holes which will fall through the LHC towards the centre of the Earth, where they will orbit around, gradually consuing the planet from beneath our feet.When the collider is commissioned, the beams will cross paths at allotted points along the tunnel, smashing into one another with cataclysmic force.My God, have these people never seen Ghostbusters??Scientists hope to see new particles in the debris of these collisions, revealing fundamental new insights into the nature of the cosmos and how it came into being. Now that is seriously cool (well, hot, actually) - to be able to recreate what the whole of reality looked like mere femtoseconds after it started...BBC storyCritics have previously raised concerns that the production of weird hypothetical particles called strangelets in the LHC could trigger the mass conversion of nuclei in ordinary atoms into more strange matter - transforming the Earth into a hot, dead lump.Earlier BBC storyAmusingly paranoid storyAnalog Magazine article

Posted by Kiteman 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Why do people always think the world's ending!?

Once again someone thinks the world's gonna end soon. Someone is suing CERN because their afraid that the new atom smasher (Large Hadron Collider (LHC) along the French-Swiss border) is going to create a black hole and suck up the Earth in a month or so. I think its gonna be another failed doomsday theory, like it probably will be.

Posted by wingman246 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


All right, who stayed up to watch it?

Who saw the LHC first beam? Anybody? My sister and I stayed up until the wee hours of the morning to watch it. The stupid live webcast didn't work. Oh wells. We'll surely see it on the news...it would've been cooler to watch it live though. : \ On another note, I told you so. :D

Posted by Lithium Rain 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


I will give out Homers!

I am giving Homers to EVERYONE,and here are the options:PEOPLE THAT ORDERED:BartboyAnarchistAsiannote:this started off in the chatroom

Posted by Derin 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Ten Years

It's been nearly ten years since a load of people got excited about the year 2000 and the 21st century, what did we achieve? Well Fox changed (the logo if nothing else) from 20th to 21st 2001 Wikipedia and iPod launched, World Trade Centre demolished (by uncertain contractor). 2002 The discovery of Quoaoar leads to Pluto being declassified as a planet 2003 Facebook launched 2004 Those robots land on Mars, Indian Ocean earthquake / tsunami 2005 Instructables launched YouTube launched, New Orleans drowns. Chas & Dave play the Holmfirth Picturedrome (img) 2006 (for the mathematicians) the Poincare conjecture is proven (right word?) MySpace launched (subsequently bought by Murdoch at what was definately much more than it's worth) 2008 LHC starts up 2009 LHC starts up again, Moon "bombed" What events the last 10 years mean something to you? *the basis of the list came from New Scientist No2739/40/41

Posted by lemonie 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


58 mins ago The Large Hadron Collider Was Activated To Much Whoopee

LHC activate! So far I'm still alive and it appears that that our universe will not be ending. This comes much to the dismay of false prophets everywhere. Though as gmjhowe points out [http://Gizmodo http://gizmodo.com/5047732/large-hadron-collider-why-you-really-wont-die-today] indicates that our time of death may have been miscalculated. Although the beam is active, the collision wont happen till October. We've been bringing you the lowdown on the LHC for a while now. You know there has been some concern that this would be the [https://www.instructables.com/community/Its-the-End-of-the-World-As-We-Know-It-.../ end of the world] due to the creation of black holes. And now the The Large Hadron Collider is activated and ready for collisions. And those crafty CERN scientists have captured our attention like a presidential scandal.-bg

Posted by lamedust 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Smash atoms with Lego!

... or at least detect the debris of smashed particles with Lego: The LHC scientists do not yet have enough data to claim a discovery. But in the meantime, at home in Copenhagen, one physicist Sascha Mehlhase from the Niels Bohr Institute has made a part of the collider, the Atlas detector, out of LEGO toy bricks. »It took me about 48 hours to build the 3D model on my laptop and another 33 hours to actually put together all the pieces, this whole process spread out over several weeks,« explains Sascha. The model is made of 9,500 lego bricks and is about 1:50 in scale. There is no construction manual yet, but there will soon be one, he says on his website. The model is very intricate, even showing the innermost pixel detector. University Post article. Gallery of images.

Posted by Kiteman 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Operation Immortality

Operation Immortality is a project to collect and archive the very best of what humanity is and has accomplished. On October 12, 2008, Richard Garriott, famed video game designer and the first second generation American astronaut, will take digitized DNA and human accomplishments with him to store in outer space when he journeys to the International Space Station.The archive will include information on humanity's greatest achievements, messages from people all over the world, and DNA samples from some of our brightest minds and most accomplished athletes. During the month of September, every human being is invited to come to the OperationImmortality.com website to submit their suggestions for our greatest achievements and leave a message for the cosmos. A lucky few may also be selected to add their DNA to the mix and join Richard Garriott as he rockets out of the atmosphere.With the LHC ready to do its thing, I think this organization has surfaced at the right time, save the earth, before we might all die.To def.LINK

Posted by bumpus 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


It's the End of the World As We Know It ...

... and I Feel Fine.So the LCH "red button" day is coming up. It is supposed to happen mid-June with collisions starting a couple of months later (I haven't found any actual dates yet though). I know that the chances of it producing a mini black hole that gobbles up the Earth (or one of many other strange, never before seen, apocalyptic theoretical physics scenarios) are small, but still ...Who thinks it would be fun to throw a party the night before they fire it up? So if the next day we all cease to exist, we could at least have the satisfaction of going out with a (big) bang. The parties could be physics themed too. We could have snacks and drinks that are composed of atoms. We could tell physics jokes ("Supercollider, I barely even know her"). We could read passages from "Flatland". And to finish the night off (this almost goes without saying for apocalypse motivated parties) we would have a massive bokononism style orgy.What do you say Instructables members, want to rub some feet?Edit: CERN is actually being sued to prevent the firing up of the LHC. Link

Posted by Tetranitrate 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


An idle thought on career diversification.

As you may know, I teach Science.You may have noticed that I occasionally venture an opinion on science-related topics.You may also have noticed that bad science, and the acceptance of anti-science tend to get on my nerves.Part of the problem, of course, is the meeja - the majority of journalists have little or no science training, so they focus on the dramatic sound-bites when reporting stuff. Heck, these days the majority of journalists aren't even journalists - they're bloggers.After the massive fuss I had to put up with at school over the LHC (destroying the world by sucking it into an exploding black hole then turning time backwards), I tried to find out where the kids got their panicky ideas from, and it turned out to be the tabloid press (the Star and the Sun, for UK readers).Now, I could wait until the papers publish their bad headlines and write an annoyed letter, or I could be pro-active.Do any of you guys think there is any mileage in setting myself up as a consulting service to the scientifically-illiterate news media?I thought, maybe, offering "expert opinions" on scientific events to newspapers that don't have scientists on staff, or maybe a translation service, turning scientific papers and press-releases into something journalists can cope with.Comments?EDITI have emailed the main local newspapers, plus the BBC.Let's see...

Posted by Kiteman 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago