Help with my Harbor Freight powder coater? The powder doesn't stick. Answered

The powder no longer sticks to the metal I'm trying to coat. I can't figure out why. The tip still sparks when I touch it to the grounded metal. The gun is clean. I bought fresh powder. I changed the disposable air drier. Everything looks like it's working. Does anyone have any experience with these? Know anything I can check or test?This is driving me crazy. Thanks!

Question by Amir 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


how coating titanium dioxide? Answered

 Dear all...  I like to build an air purifier filter with UVCm lamp +titanium dioxide. Please help me to know how I can stick titanium dioxide powder on surface aluminum or cardboard .Thank you in advance.

Question by lam 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Powder coating/strong spraypainting for metal jewelry

I'm looking to create colored metal jewelry findings with a durable surface, are there any products or techniques that i could do DIY? Otherwise are there any sites that sell nice coloured/powder coated/matte surface findings? I can't seem to find anything!!

Topic by jarris 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


glow in the dark bike

After getting hit by a car while riding at night (even though I had lights) I am considering powder-coating the frame of my bike with a glow in the dark additive. I was wondering if anyone had attempted this before, and if you had thoughts on it. Also, can you powder-coat spokes? I know powder-coating the rims is bad because it interferes with the brake pads functioning, but I'd really like my bike to be as visible as possible. 

Topic by luckbug 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


How do you do graphics powder coating?

Question by Powdermania 10 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Is it difficult to powder coat a bike? is this the best way to paint a bike and is it available in lots of colours?

Is it difficult to powder coat a bike? is this the best way to paint a bike and is it available in lots of colours? I heard it was basically primary colours but does anyone have anyinfo on this?

Question by bobbymun 9 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


While doing electrolysis on some pennies, (Pence?) I noticed a copper coating on my + copper lead?

Is there something special about this? Also, Is this a form of electroplating? I doused some pennies in vinegar for about a week+ and tried this. On a thinner, magnet wire lead, (copper +) it had what I beleive is a dark green copper salt, that burned blue. Can anyone Identify this? Also, I changed the diameter of the lead, to about 1/16 - 1/8 (Copper lead, +) and It seemed like that lead was powder coated with copper. Is there a reason it would not be a copper salt? The other was coated with what I think is Zinc.

Question by PKTraceur 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


What can I use to strip powder coating without sandblasting? Answered

I have some tins that I want to strip but they have powder coating. I've tried heavy duty strippers and a sander and a 9" wire wheel sander none of which work that well. Any suggestions? The 9" wire wheel did remove some of the paint but it also burnt or melted the metal faster then it removed the paint. Those cookie tins are thin.

Question by threadbare 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


What is the best way to screen print on metal?

I need to print different colors on my products I make.  I powder coat them but I want to screen print a lable on them.  I've tried using another color or coating with stencils and high heat tape, but it did not turn out well.  Any help would be much appreciated! Thanks!

Question by Tanman23 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Fire Extinguisher Case as a Water Bottle?

I went to test an old 2lb fire extinguisher we had by pressing the green test button and, it didn't work. The fire extinguisher was a BC type dry chemical fire extinguisher. The label reads (CONTENTS OF BC DRY CHEMICAL POWDER: SODIUM BICARBONATE, MICA, CALCIUM STEARATE, NUISANCE DUST, IRRITANT; HMIS 0-0-0.) I took the chemical out to use as crude sodium bicarbonate, and now I want to use the bottle. My plan is to keep the labels on, find a cap like they use on most aluminum water bottles, and clean the inside out really well. The question I have is, is it safe? It says the contents are non-toxic, but I would still want to clean it really well. What would I clean it with? Would I have to coat the inside of the bottle because of the metal, (powder coating type place) and if so, what type of coating? Thanks! 

Topic by tinstructable 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


GID Vials, Tritium, TRASERS, Powders and Chemicals GLOW IN THE DARK!

TRITIUM! So I get a lot of questions from my post and instructables. Tritium Vials are Radioactive Hydrogen H3, also known as hydrogen-3 is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. It is contained in small glass vials coated in colored phosphor then encased in glass or sealed plastics. These are commonly seen in Gun Sights, Watches (TRASERS) and some Emergency Exit Signs. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tritium_illumination Small amounts are legal and for approved uses. Read the NRC guides Typically the Trit vials are small, expensive and dim. The latest GID (Glow in the Dark) Chemsticks, LED's and GID Powders or paints seems much more effective and usable. * Cyalume, as used in a lightsticks, emits light by chemiluminescence of a fluorescent dye (also called fluorescor) activated by cyalume reacting with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a catalyst, such as sodium salicylate. It is the most efficient chemiluminescent reaction known. up to 15% quantum efficiency. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemiluminescence New LED low power requirements and high Lumen or light output have provided many solutions that are low cost, high power and longer lasting. GID Paint or Powders are "charged" with light or daylight sources as with your traditional kids toys or stickers. New products are brighter, glow longer and are now waterproof, have many colors and applications. http://www.4physics.com/catalog/GIDinfo.php Also this is occasionally confused with the chemical illumination. However these paints powders and materials use common phosphorescent materials include zinc sulfide and strontium aluminate. Use of zinc sulfide for safety related products dates back to the 1930s. However, the development of strontium oxide aluminate, with a luminance approximately 10 times greater than zinc sulfide, has relegated most zinc sulfide based products to the novelty category. Strontium oxide aluminate based pigments are now used in exit signs, pathway marking, and other safety related signage. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphorescence Hope this helps! 01/2011 - Update Source for Materials http://www.darkniteglow.com/glow-shop/ ERCK www.Candlepowerforums.com Additional Tritium Resources * U.S. NRC: http://www.nrc.gov/reactors/operating/ops-experience/grndwtr-contam-tritium.html * U.S. EPA: http://www.epa.gov/radiation/radionuclides/tritium.htm * U.S. DOE (Argonne National Lab): http://www.ead.anl.gov/pub/doc/tritium.pdf * California EPA: http://www.oehha.ca.gov/water/phg/allphgs.html * University of Idaho: http://www.physics.isu.edu/radinf/tritium.htm

Topic by erckgillis 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


DIY Electrostatic Spray Gun? Answered

I heard about a new product, but it appears to be only available in Europe and South America (what the...?): http://www.hammerite.com/uk/products/ps_metalmaster.htmlSounds like it uses technology similar to powder coating, but with spray paint. Has anyone used this thing? Does it work? Is it something that could be home-built?

Question by berserk 9 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Homemade Smore Marshmallow Testers

Ok,Here's an idea for those of you who want to get into the kitchen this weekend and play around. Some of you may have seen my Ible on making marshmallows.So here's the experiment. The favorite marshmallow treat for many people would have to be the s'mores made over a campfire. Lets see if we can recreate some of these flavors in a single marshmallow treat.Ideas:-Use the standard vanilla marshmallow recipe as a base.-Experiment with liquid smoke flavoring to add some smoky taste. Probably not too much.-Possibly add a bit of burnt sugar. Might be able to do this torching the outside of the marshmallow or by some other means.-Graham crackers. Either crushed into a powder and added to the powder coating, or left whole and just stuck to the marshmallow.-Chocolate. Could be added in multiple places. Could be added directly to the marshmallow itself. Cocoa powder could be added to the powder mix. Melted chocolate could be drizzled over the marshmallow or dipped in.Anyone else have any other idea or feel up to the challenge of testing out the recipe?

Topic by cainunable 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


From Concept To Product

So the frame is 95% done -- the last bits are: 1. Fit into fairing (that top tube thing will be cut down significantly) 2. Powder Coat 3. Debug (we have more torsional flex than we want) But, it's a LOT of fun. You're butt is 7 inches off the ground. You can cruise at a pretty fast speed with relatively little effort (compared to an upright bike). And it is VERY comfortable. Just showing something coming up -- a video on this has been encoding since 11:30 last night, and it says it has 403 minutes remaining :P Feedback?

Topic by trebuchet03 12 years ago  |  last reply 12 years ago


what the type of laser can i use

Hi what the type of laser can i use 300 mw laser , 500mw laser or  1000mw ........ like this in ebay  http://www.ebay.com/itm/Discount-500mW-laser-engraving-machine-optical-USB-CO2-Mini-Laser-Engraving-/221604426524?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash;=item3398a7331c or this http://www.ebay.com/itm/USB-Mini-Laser-300mW-Engraving-Machine-DIY-Carving-Logo-Picture-Marking-Printer-/261737902034?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash;=item3cf0cb6fd2 i want to make my diy laser engraver i want to know if the laser removes the powder coated paint from the surface of the Zippo Lighter to reveal the bare brass metal underneath. like this video on youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Zjwc1OIHZU

Topic by NURKABIL 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


How to put a design on a metal mug?

So, i just put this in the forums (and i can't see it..) So i thought i'd put it here too. I want to put my designs on traveller's mugs and other metal mugs and i was thinking, what are the different way i can do this?  I've seen someone do it with a vinyl and powder coating...but the tools needed to do that are pretty expensive to get here, so that's my last resort. So i was wondering what are the other ways that i can do this?  I hope you guys can help me out with this. Thanks :) P.S I'm new to this.... so can anyone tell me why my forum post isn't showing up? :P

Question by AttractiveToast 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


How to put a design on a metal cup?

Hey Guys! So I'm a bit new to this (meaning I'm totally new.) So I'm not sure if this question has been asked before,. If it has, please redirect me to it :) I'm looking to 'personalise' a metal traveller's mug, and just metal mugs in general and i was wondering what options are available? I want to go through the options before i pick the method that i'll use. What i want to do exactly is to put my design on the cup permanently. I've seen someone use a vinyl decal and a powder coating machine, but that's pretty expensive to get over here. So what are the other ways i can do that?  I hope someone can shed some light on this for me, Thanks :)

Topic by AttractiveToast 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Re-anodizing a macbook pro? Answered

I am getting an old macbook pro in the mail soon and am going to have to pretty much tear it down completely to repair it. I have seen a few guides on anodizing aluminum, and was wondering if maybe, possibly I would be able to anodize my macbook to a different color! Would this require de-anodizing the aluminum? (the model is a late 08 macbook, so I dont know if that is a powder coated one).  It would be awesome If I could color it a nice matte black (my preferred color) Has anyone attempted doing something like this before? I have some scrap brushed aluminum to practice on.. would that work? I know this could be easily accomplished with a black case... but I kind of want to go a bit further than that... 

Question by astroboy907 6 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


(newsletter) Ballistic Gel, Fridge Alarm, Vulcan Lyre...

Sign-up for this newsletter: Welcome back! NEW! Get in the Garden Contest - Enter any Instructable with a gardening theme and win a very cool computer-controlled indoor composting machine from NatureMill! Art of Sound Contest - Share any sound or music-related Instructable in our new contest and win an incredible custom hi-fi tower set with subwoofer or monster speakers! Get the LED Out! Contest - Enter any Instructable that involves LEDs, and win some amazing lights from Monkeylectric! Results are up for the Mother's Day Contest and Earthjustice United States of Efficiency Contest. See the winners here and here! The SteamRoller Riding Contraption Table for Electronic Dreams Make Traditional Baguettes by Hand Build Custom Speakers - Art of Sound Contest Win a high-tech computer-controlled composter and easily turn scraps into soil! Simple Metalworking Techniques ValveLiTzer Guitar Pedal Redux Make a Fridge Alarm to Catch Thieves Powder Coat a Bike Frame with Logos Ballistic Gel Use Sculpey on a Vinyl Toy Solar Light Up Rock Stairwell Pita Pizza: The Five Minute Snack Share your best LED creations! Win these custom hi-fi speakers! Acoustic Vulcan Lyre Crutch Chair Fortune Boat Lamp Make a Fiberglass Speaker Enclosure Sign-up for this newsletter:

Topic by fungus amungus 9 years ago


Using modern UV active pigments for indirect lighting?

I am still living from boxes after moving house but I came to a small batch of very impressive UV active powder. This new kind glows in the dark for at least a full night with good visability and usally it sold with the color name "auqa blue" - just don't be fooled by the old style pigments that only lasted for a fe minutes, I am taking about hours here.... The images and videos I tried with my SLR and phone are all terrible, seems they don't really like UV light :( My thought was something like this: Having a sufficient amount of pigment in the top coat of the wall or ceiling paint to allow for a nice glow. Either on floor or ceiling level a row of UV LED's to allow for a quick charge of the pigments, or as an alternative once technology has caught up EL panels in the UV range with a pigment coating. An area of 5x2cm is already enough as a "reading light" for several hours or to illuminate a map during night time hiking trips. Also with the long after glow it would be quite possible to use "light transmission". Here you have acrylic sheets on the outside walls or roof catching the light and transporting it to the inside. So you could use natural light during the day that would also charge the pigments on wall or ceiling. Of course this is not really feasable for home use unless you don't require any sleep but tunnels, bunkers, mines and such could benefit especially if using fibre optics to "transport" the light to where it is needed. Another great idea (at least I think it is) would be to use these pigments on footpaths and sporting grounds. Imagine a footpath that glows at night and illuminates where you go! Or imagine a big factory during a power outage at night having clear walkways to direct the workers showing up all of a sudden on the floor... Some quality pigments still allow for over 200 lumens after 60 minutes of recharge - this is in the region of a low power LED of modern technology. I don't think a topic like this will qualify for a best answer but I would love to hear your thoughts and ideas on the topic of these modern after glow pigments.....

Question by Downunder35m 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


What on earth could I use this 'Lectern Commander' for?

I picked this up on ebay for 5 dollars last month, apparently it retails for a couple of thousand, but im yet to think of a novel way to utilise this guy. Here are some specs from the pdf file i found on this lectern site.The Lectern Commander is able to communicate both direct Infra Red and RS232Combines the best features of a dedicated key control panel and a colour touchscreen in a single unit - Fits directly into unmodified industry-standard lectern - Modular design allows integration of microphone sockets, lectern light etc. for special applications - 32 key digital matrix touch overlay - Flexible – can function as a stand-alone controller or in conjunction with any of the CommBox range of processors - Easy to program with standard Joey software, tools and library - Low power consumption allows operation on long low-voltage cablesKeys: 32, including 10 touchscreen keys Panel Type: Colour LCD, CCFL Backlight Panel Size: 4.0” diagonal Resolution: 320 x 240 pixels Brightness: 80cd/m2 (Typical) Contrast Ratio: 17:1 (Typical) Display Colour: 8 Colour Connectivity: IRBus (6.35mm TRS), IR (3.5mm phono), RS-232 (DB9). IR carrier frequency: 38kHz (industry standard) Power Supply: 12volts (Supplied by IR-Bus) Current demand: 100 – 200mA (depends on brightness setting). Standby current: 5mA. Enclosure: Steel, black powder coated Dimensions: 540mm x 80mm x 70mm hmmm any ideas???

Question by daulef 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


All right, let's clear this up: What the hell is inside of a battery?

Really frustrating: I accidentally closed the tab I had been working on for about 15 minutes, so I'll probably be missing a couple of questions I had been meaning to ask.So anyway: When I peel off the outermost metal covering of a zinc-carbon battery, I'm just taking away a protective steel covering, right? When I get rid of that, am I looking at the actual zinc "case?"What is the sticky, black material that surrounds the graphite rod? Is that manganese dioxide? Is manganese dioxide the same thing manganese oxide?Further outwards from the center of the battery, there is another black substance. Is this ammonium chloride?I haven't actually chopped open a carbon-zinc battery all the way yet. Is there a good technique for removing all of the contents?How can I tell the difference between the two black substances? Is the moist, black paste ammonium chloride? If this is so, then why, when I pull the graphite rod out of the battery, is it sometimes coated with a sticky, black substance? Do the substances mix with each other or are both substances sticky and black? Is one a powder?Is it okay to drill through one end of the battery? If I drill into the negative terminal of the battery, what will fall out?Basically, what are the physical properties of all the materials? How can I tell the difference between them?Now: On to alkaline batteries...Both types (carbon-zinc and alkaline) appear to use manganese dioxide. Is this so? On Wikipedia's article on alkaline batteries, manganese dioxide is described as Zn/MnO2, with the two as a sub-script. Does the slash mark mean that zinc and manganese dioxide are interchangeable?What will I find if I open up an alkaline battery? Is it safe to do so? What is a good, safe way to open one up?Are there any particular "fun" applications for these chemicals? Think explodiness ; )I've heard that manganese dioxide can be used to produce oxygen. How do I do this?There might be some yellow tag-box notes on these, pictures. For the context, visit my Instructable on how to make your own carbon arc light. I'm not trying to advertise, I'm just anticipating someone asking about them.

Topic by carbon 12 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


bare bronze welding cast iron

If you happen to have a some what rare car, or one that is simply thirty or more years old, you may find that if you ever crack your manifold exauhst that you can not get another by simply going to a (pick and pull) So, the first thought is..most of the time, "I will simply zap it with NIRod". WRONG! an old manifold that has repeatedly heated and cooled is very brittle and the sudden change in temp and too rapid cooling may crack it even more. Now what i do is use bare bronze rod and braze the crack. Here is how i do it. First I find the ends of the cracks and drill a 1/4 hole half way through the material at each end of the cracks. Next I use a rose bud torch and heat up the cast iron as evenly as possible peening with a hammer lightly to releive stress in the casting. After about five minutes of this I quickly switch to a oxy-actl. brazing tip and start my pass. The first thing i do is heat up as much of the crack as i can to cherry red and sear one coat of bronze using plenty of flux. Then I start at one end of the crack and fill in the crack that i had previously veed out with a grinder to half way of the depth of the material and no more than 1/4 inch wide. I use an overlapping spot weld like technique. i lay a small amount of bronze, remove heat for a second and overlapp where i left out. When done I have a bronze brazing weld with no undercut or cold roll. Then i use the rose bud again for some post heating gradulay reducing the heat and peening with hammer again. Then I quickly take the whole peice and cover it in powdered lime so that it cools very slowly. This will stop it from cracking due to rapid cooling. Also it may put some ductility in the cast iron. It takes about four hours to be cool enough to touch with the bare hand. Then I grind the bronze weld flush and inspect the weld to see if i got proper bonding, all you should see is a ribbon of nbronze that has no porosity or cavities. I have also done rare boat manifolds like this when repeative NIRod was used at other shops and they broke every time. Still no 100 percent with cast iron like this. Sometimes it just cracks more, after all it is a dirty porous metal that is very brittel. Anyway, i have had very good luck doing it this way

Topic by beserker 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Creating copper nano particles

Be it conductive ink, decorations or just a special pigment for your paint project, Copper is nice.Only problem is grinding this soft metal fine enough to be of any good use.A not so well documented feature of food additives is that they often have "unwanted" side effects.In our case E300, Ascorbic Acid or just Vitamin C.So how to make copper nano particles with it you might wonder?Prepare a well saturated solution of Copper Sulphate, you find the blue crystals in the gardening section together with fertilisers.It is best to use destilled water and not plain tap water, if in doubt go at least with the demineralised stuff for batteries.Adding E300 either dissolved in water or directly as crystals will start a nice reaction.The copper solphate is reduced back to metallic copper.There are a few problems though...For best results you need a saturation copper sulphate solution, low temperatures and a magnetic stirrer.This produced the finest particles for me at around 5°C.But even warm or at room temp the constant sirring is beneficial for even particle sizes.The ascorbic acid is used up in the process as well.You can start with a little and see how much you end up with in terms of a layer of copper particles at the bottom.Adding more E300 will cause a "rain" of fine copper particles - once this no longer happens you know the copper sulphate is used up as well.A dark greenish color of the solution will indicate this as well.Getting the copper out of the glass...Keep in mind the copper is extreme fine!As long as it stays in the solution it won't oxidize or otherwise react.Once out and in contact with just water and air oxidation happens quickly, after all it is pure copper...I found removing the watery solution and then adding destilled water to repeat the process is a good start.The waste from the first round can still be usefull though...In the final round I try to remove as much water as I can and then add methyled spirit to prevent the reactions.You can use oil as well or do a quick vacuum drying and store it in a sealed and oxygen free container.What to do with it?As a condictive paint with the right binder it only needs some rubbing with a smooth tool to create a conductive cover with a low resistance.In a clear paint or resin it provides some stunning color effects.You can even dust the dry powder onto a freshly painted surface to get a copper look.Leave without a top coat and you quickly get an old copper or even green look.If you ever wanted extreme fine metal particles you will come up with more ideas...Like shielding or sintering....

Topic by Downunder35m 6 days ago  |  last reply 5 days ago