Kala Art Institute Residency Program and Classes

Kala Art Institute is a great resource for artists offering residency programs and workshops. RESIDENCY PROGRAMS Artists in need of space and equipment for work in printmaking, photography, or digital media are encouraged to apply to Kala's residency program in one of two ways. The Artist-in-Residence Program provides accepted artists with 24-hour access to Kala’s Print Studio and Electronic Media Center. Established in 1974, Kala’s Artist-in-Residence program is geared towards providing short- and long-term communal studio space at low monthly rates to both emerging and established artists. The program has steadily grown to reach its current annual population of approximately seventy-five artists from the Bay Area and beyond. The Fellowship Award, an international competition, annually grants nine artists a cash award, unlimited access to Kala’s facilities for up to six months, and a culminating show in the Kala Gallery, through a highly competitive jurying process. The Fellowship Award is geared towards supporting artists in completing specific projects or bodies of work that would benefit from Kala's specialized equipment. Many Fellowship winners transition to the Artist-in-Residence program at the conclusion of their Fellowship period in order to continue their work at Kala. CLASSES Kala offers some of the best printmaking and digital media classes in the Bay Area. Located in Berkeley, every year Kala offers the community close to one hundred classes in a wide range of techniques, utilizing the exceptional equipment available in our printmaking studio and electronic media center. The small, hands-on classes foster creative exchange with instructors and fellow students, and all of our instructors are exhibiting artists. We offer numerous classes combining digital and traditional printmaking in different ways. Choose a class that explores a new interest, or refines previous experience. Both beginners and advanced professional artists will find classes at appropriate skill levels, with detailed class descriptions, in Kala’s annual course catalog and on our website. The website has the most up-to-date class information. Private classes and tutoring sessions in many subjects are also available. Below is a link to our 2012 class calender: http://www.kala.org/class/class.html Carrie Hott Program Coordinator, Classes & Artist Residencies carrie@kala.org tel: 510-549-2977 ext. 303

Posted by carriekala 6 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


Fozzy13's AiR Experience!

Being an Artist in Residence at Instructables was an amazing experience.  It's difficult to put into words but I'll give it my best shot. Let's start at the beginning!  Because where else would you start?  I'm a college student, but I wasn't when I started to love building things.  A knee injury years ago took me out of wrestling for a summer and I used my ample free time during that time period quickly filled up as I was excited by the idea of breaking water into hydrogen and oxygen.  Over the past five years, I've grown to love making all sorts of things.  Instructables has always been a fantastic community to get ideas for projects and share what I've made.  After being part of the community for so long I wanted a chance to be a bigger part of Instructables and have the opportunity to meet some of the people who I've been following on this website for years!  Hopefully that only sounds mildly creepy.  The Artist in Residence program allowed me to have just that opportunity. I had the honor of being one of the very first Artists to make use of Instructables/Autodesk's brand new facility.  It's incredible.  If you're on a tour, it will be referred to as the greatest workshop and creative space in the world, and after working in it for a month,  that's an easy statement for me to believe.  The metal shop is where I loved spending most of my time as I worked on my main project: a jet engine.  However, I barely scratched the surface of what's possible even when I dabbled in playing around with 3D printing and laser cutting.  I'll post links to the projects I did when I'm done at the bottom of this post! I could go on and on about how exciting it was to learn how to TIG weld, or pull my first 3D printed object out of the printer for cleaning.  That's not what I loved most about being an Artist in Residence.  Don't get me wrong, that's why I was there, and I loved every minute of it!  But what I loved most was just being in the office at Instructables.  It was an amazing feeling to get to interact with lots of different people who all in some way loved to make things.  Being around people who know what Maker Faire is meant a lot to me!  Usually mentioning it only yields confused faces in my city.  It was great getting to talk about different projects people had done or were working on, which made me love "Build Day"s more than anything.  Being at the headquarters of Maker Culture made me feel at home. I've been away from the Pier where Instructables HQ is for a few weeks now.  I miss everyone I got to meet there, and I miss having the resources to make anything I could imagine.  Being and Artist in Residence will always be one of my best memories ever, and I can only hope that at some point I'll end up back at Instructables to see the awesome people I met and build some more cool stuff. Thank you to everyone at Instructables who made my short stay a great experience!  I can't thank you enough. - Projects! https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Make-a-Mini-Compressed-Air-Turbine/ https://www.instructables.com/id/3D-Printed-Modular-Ball-and-Socket-Joints/ https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-your-own-Instructables-Robot-Keychain Jet Engine Instructable coming later!

Posted by fozzy13 5 years ago | last reply 5 years ago


Making The Most Of Your Time Here

If you're reading this, you're hopefully about to become an AiR in the best workshop on earth. Congratulations! This is an amazing opportunity, and i'd like to share my experiences so that you can hopefully glean some wisdom. When I got here, I was quickly humbled. For the first time in my life, I was intimidated. I had never been in such a vast playground and wealth of resources. I put myself under a lot of pressure. I started with some smaller projects that ended up taking a lot longer than anticipated. I did everything the hard way. During this time I formed a great relationship with shop staff, and gained a deep respect for them. A month will go by and you will look back and wonder where it all went. There are a million distractions, and it's a tough game to balance them all. In my last two months, I decided I needed to pick a problem to solve. I bit off more than I could chew, and I chewed it. I did something a bit unconventional, and did a project on sustainability. I was in over my head, and I brought in a friend for help. And i'm really glad I did. Don't constrain yourself to being an 'artist'. You are about to immerse yourself deep in the heart of the maker movement. Make things that you will be proud of, that you can do nowhere else.  This is an nearly infinite opportunity, with the only limiting factor being time. You are skilled enough, have the aptitude, and can do absolutely anything. So what on earth do you make?  Quick Tips: -Pick a problem, and solve it.  Pick a problem that's bigger than one person.  -Don't shackle additional commitments during this time. (I burnt out from a big side project) Devote yourself to the shop. -Reach out to someone at Autodesk, and see if you can get mentorship, or use your art to inform things that they are interested in. Form a relationship with them. You will find wisdom and friendship. -Find a peer, and check in regularly about the scope of your work.  -Pick someone to collaborate on a big project with. Make someone else's dream come true.  -Space out your classes. Don't do it all at once, or you'll forget what that critical button on the DMS is.  Time Breakdown: 33% of your time goes towards collaboration 33% towards learning new stuff that's way above your comfort level 33% for the stuff you can do with your eyes closed

Posted by buchananwp 4 years ago | last reply 4 years ago


Who's Who in the AiR Program

Check out the talented artists we have in the AiR Program - For a full size view, click here.

Posted by Nesserz 4 years ago | last reply 4 years ago


Program Feedback

What's it like to be an Artist in Residence at Instructables?  Don't ask us, ask our previous residents! Being an artist in residence at Instructables by Samuel Bernier Jayefuu as Instructables' Artist in Residence by James Williamson (Jayfu) Last Day at Instructables by Kelsey Breseman (SelkeyMoonbeam) My time as an AiR by Mark Langford (Kiteman) My Summer as an AIR at Instructables by Gabriella Levine (gabriellalevine) Field Report - Mads Hobye as an Artist in Residence by Mads Hobye (madshobye) My Month at Instructables as an Artist in Residence by Tom Flock (Tomdf) What it's like to be an Artist in Residence at Instructables by Tim Wikander (timwikander) Reflecting on my AiResidency by Taylor Cone (tcone) The worst time of my life by Mario Caicedo Langer (M.C. Langer) Fozzy13's AiR Experience! by Adam Fasnacht (Fozzy13) Masynmachien's time as an AIR  by Yvon Masyn (masynmachien) My 2 Months as an AiR by Tess Howell (Tessalene) An embarrassment of riches by Rachel McConnell (rachel) My experience as an AIR by Tanner Welch (Tanner W) The AiR05 - designed and built during Q4:13 by Timothy Lipton (timmylip) Living Salad, makerbot songs, and noodle by Lauren Mccarthy (lmccart) How to got to Maker Heaven by Mikaela Holmes (MikaelaHolmes) Crazy, Amazing and Delicious AIR Experience by Rima Khalek (rimamonsta) Autodesk: Art Residency of Generosity by Scott Kildall Autodesk Artist in Residency by Anouk Wipprecht (anoukwipprecht) Duck Confit, Perfected by Aaron Geman (aaron_geman) Pier 9, I've never met anyone quite like you before. by Andrew Maxwell-Parish (ElectricSlim) To Pier 9, Thank for Everything by Thiago Hersan My Introduction to the 21st Century by John Whitmarsh My Autodesk Residency by Benjamin Cowden (tinkertinker) Talking about my Summer by Laura Devendorf (LDevendorf) Pier 9 is a Disneyland for Makers by Alejandro Palandjoglou (alepalan) Reflections on Pier 9 Residency by Andreas Bastian (andreasbastian) Making the Most of Your Time Here by Will Buchanan (buchananwp) Reflections on the Pier by Reza Ali (syedrezaali)

Posted by noahw 6 years ago


AiRs in the Media

Our AiRs have been making waves both online and through published articles. Check out some of the cool articles that have been written about the work that our AiRs are doing!

Posted by Nesserz 4 years ago | last reply 4 years ago


UK Residency Opportunity (Engineers, Makers, Designers)

The Victoria & Albert Museum have announced a residency programme that might be right up your street: We have just issued a new open call for a one year residency targeted at UK based engineers, makers and designers who wish to develop their practice by responding in their own way to the rich engineering heritage of the Museum – from the Collection’s origins in the Great Exhibition of 1851 and architectural history of the site, to the pioneering engineering systems at work in the Museum’s ongoing Exhibition Road Building Project.   We are ideally looking an engineer and welcome applications from practitioners from a variety of engineering disciplines (structural, civil, mechanical, engineering design, electrical, biological etc.) but we also welcome applications from makers and designers with a demonstrated interest in engineering. The resident should be interested in engaging with an operational building site and live architecture project. At the same time, he/she should be keen to develop public programmes with a range of different audiences linked to the Museum’s 2016 Engineering Season. We are therefore looking for practitioners who want to use this residency to create, build and present their work to the public while allowing museum visitors to follow their work in progress and understand their creative process through open studios, workshops, talks and other participatory programmes. http://www.vam.ac.uk/blog/artists-residence-va/new-open-call-exhibition-road-engineering-residency Information for applicants Residency period: April 2016 – April 2017 Bursary: £10,000 for twelve months (subject to tax and national insurance) Studio at the Victoria & Albert Museum in South Kensington An additional budget for production of public-facing activities or displays Deadline for applications: midnight, 17 January 2016 Interview date: 26 January 2016

Posted by Kiteman 3 years ago


How to Go to Maker Heaven

Dear Pier 9, You are a place like no other, and I’m so glad you came into my life.  I was a full time Artist in Residence at the Pier for 4 months, and I doubt I have ever been so simultaneously intellectually stimulated, inspired and intimidated at any other point.  When I came to the Pier I had been living in New York for 8 years, and I had just decided to make a permanent migration back to my homeland on the West Coast.  I’d heard rumors about the rampant culture of innovation in the Bay Area, but I was still totally unprepared for the explosion of creative energy and excitement that is the nerdy artist heaven called Pier 9. Maybe I’m just getting older and less jaded… but in the last few years, I have felt a change in the world, a shift in attitude from angst to optimism, from critique to creation, and I think places like the Pier exemplify this new positive force.  The fact that a multinational corporation like Autodesk has allocated a significant amount of resources to giving the imaginations of a bunch of madcap inventors, artists, engineers and other creatives free reign in a beautiful lab with a bunch of cutting edge machines… well, to me that says good things about the direction of the world.  But what really makes the Pier special, I think, is the fact that all the creativity taking place there is fundamentally motivated by the philosophy of Instructables; by the idea that knowledge should be shared.  I have never encountered a group of people so willing to share their ideas and skills, and so excited to help make other people’s dreams a reality.  And the feeling was really infectious!  Everyone was so ridiculously helpful, that on the rare occasion I had the opportunity to teach someone else a skill, it felt like a treat. That’s not to say that my experience at the Pier was all sunshine and roses.  It was exhausting and draining, and very ego challenging.  When I first arrived I was incredibly overwhelmed by all the new information I was intaking.  I had projects in mind, but those ideas were quickly swept away in the tide of new ideas that arose with every fascinating technology, and possibility I encountered.  Having nearly unlimited options can be paralyzing, and I fell pray to this paralysis many times at the Pier.  One of the pitfalls of having so many amazing minds in one place is that someone always has a new idea that will either revolutionize the project you are working on, or cause you to completely change direction and start working on something new.  That can be great, but if you aren’t careful it can cause acute artistic ADD. I think most creative journeys have a similar arc.  When you are learning new skills, it can take a while for the quality of the work you are producing to catch up with your creative vision.  I definitely felt that way at the Pier.  During my time there, my work ended up going on a journey from two dimensions to three dimensions.  I started out by experimenting with laser cutting.  I am a costume designer, and was interested in creating a wearable mechanical flower that would illuminate and open and close in response to its environment.  My first attempts to create this form felt very flat and lifeless to me, so I stepped away from the flower project and focused on figuring out how to create something much more three dimensional with the two dimensional process of laser cutting.  The result was a costume constructed from laser cut leather and el wire.  After that I decided I was ready to tackle 3D modeling and 3D printing, so I went back to my flower idea, and spent the rest of my time at the Pier testing and developing this form.  It was a really new and interesting process, 3D modeling and prototyping with the amazing Objet printers.  It also gave me the chance to work closely with two other awesome Artists in Residence, Paolo Salvagione and JoeJoe Martin.  It really underlined for me that the most important resource at the Pier is the people.  No matter how many incredible machines you have under one roof, they are only as good as the minds running them.  Noah Weinstein and the other amazing innovators who run the Pier have done such an incredible job of gathering together a diverse, brilliant, exciting, and truly kind-hearted group of people… the place practically buzzes with welcoming creative energy as soon as you walk through the door.  Also, putting relatively self-actualized creators in an environment where there are so many options and resources results in some incredibly interesting glimpses into individual human passion and curiosity.  I might not have fully understood why some of my fellow AiRs were so fascinated by stacking tetrahedrons, drawing graphically detailed pictures of intestinal parasites, or creating physical bodies for virtual bots, but witnessing each artist’s commitment to their singular pursuit was in itself a fascinating and beautiful experience. So much of our lives are spent trying to make practical things happen, it’s an rare opportunity to get to spend a dedicated amount of time just exploring the potential of creative ideas.  I really think that is what Pier 9 is about, providing a place that nurtures our human desire to create, explore and learn… with a kick ass set of resources to facilitate that exploration.  Honestly, during my time there I wish I had been able to let go and enjoy that process more.  It’s not always easy to escape the concepts of deadlines and expectations, but sometimes freeing yourself from those constraints is the only way to create anything truly new.  I very much believe that what is growing at Pier 9 is a new and exciting kind of creative ecosystem, and I hope it will inspire the creation of many more similar environments.  I feel incredibly lucky to have gotten a chance to be an explorer on the frontiers of Maker Land.  Thank you so much Noah and Vanessa.

Posted by MikaelaHolmes 4 years ago | last reply 4 years ago


Only US and Canadian residents

Oh... that's bad ...

Posted by farzadbayan 8 years ago | last reply 8 years ago


should i buy resident evil the darkside chronicles ? Answered

 

Asked by GianniMora 9 years ago | last reply 9 years ago


is there a resident evil for psp? Answered

I asked gamestop but they said no but i searched it on the internet and it said said there was. so is there a resident evil for the psp, and is so where can i buy it.

Asked by GianniMora 8 years ago | last reply 8 years ago



Reflections on the Pier

Writing this is one of the hardest things to do. Writing this means that my artist-in-residence at Pier 9 has come to an end. What motivates me to keep writing is something that I learned and deeply embraced at the pier. The pier taught me that giving back to the community you're in is priceless and extremely valuable. More on this later. First, I want to tell you a little bit about my journey at the Pier.  During the first quarter of the residency I was overwhelmed by the things I could make at Pier 9. Pier 9 has it all, it's a makers / artist / designer / engineers paradise. So when I got there, I realized that I could make anything, which then made me question why I wanted to make those things and if those things really mattered... What impact would they have on the world, on me, on my surrounding community... This period of questioning was frustrating and hard. While others at the pier were making amazing objects and projects that were getting a lot of press and attention I was just sitting there... thinking as time was quickly passing by. Maybe this was something akin to writer's block. Maybe this was just me being an emotional artist. Maybe this was just me being burned out from a hard year of working at start ups in Silicon Valley. Maybe this was just growing pains (because I was transitioning from writing software to making physical things).  Things got better tho. What really helped get me out of this rut was the community at pier 9, especially Vanessa and Company. The community at Pier 9 is hands down the most valuable asset the pier has. The machines are great, but its really about the people that the pier attracts. Never have I worked in a space where everyone is so excited, helpful, funny, and happy about their work and the community around them. The culture at the pier is what helped me find my path and eventually helped me make a couple fun projects. I could go on and on about how awesome the community is, but I want to give you a couple concrete examples of things that happened to me that helped me grow and morph into who I am today.  Vanessa Sigurdson would sit down with me every so often and ask me how things were going. When I got really stuck on something she would immediate connect me with someone who could help me or show me something that could inspire me or help me get through my block. Thanks Vanessa, I owe you big time.  I asked Noah Weinstein a ton about his shop in Oakland and how he started it. His super valuable knowledge made me feel empowered and able! He is an individual that really follows through with what he says, very admirable! Thanks Noah!   Andy Lee and I would sit around and talk about triangles and math. Andy is an awesome maker and brave individual. He taught me to just try things out and not care too much if they failed. Andy's experiments at the pier made me feel comfortable prototyping ideas and concepts. Not everything has to be a final art piece. Being an artist / engineer is also about exploring and failing! Thanks Andy! Paolo Salvagione connected me with a major museum in SF. Next year I'll be showing a couple pieces there. His work has been an endless source of inspiration for me. The mechanical beauty in his designs inspires me to make every element in my art pieces elegant and beautiful. Paolo you are the man.  Dot Matrix and I went on runs along the Embarcadero to Crissy Field. Dot gave me some great perspective on the projects I was working on and vice versa. These runs helped clear my mind. In addition, looking at the ocean reminded me that the world is bigger than me. Its a great stress relief. Thanks Dot!!! Sitting next to Andreas Bastian was one of the best parts of the residency. Every time I thought what I was doing was hard, I'd just look at this desk and be humbled by the challenges he was taking on. Thank you Andreas, your work ethic is off the charts.  Craig Dorety blew my mind with his LED sculptures. Experiencing one of his pieces was like a DMT trip (from what I've heard :) ). Craig also taught me a ton about the art world and about how to do miter cuts on the water jet! IGES files are the key!! Thanks Craig!  Robb Godshaw taught me how to follow my impulses. If you have an idea brewing inside of you, you MUST make it! You are an awesome individual Robb! Keep killing it!  Observing Anouk Wipprecht taught me about being fearless and tackling challenges with authority. In addition to being an amazing designer, maker, hacker, and person, Anouk really knows how to reach out to her networks and communities for feedback, involvement, and help.  Dr. Woohoo taught me how to connect with people, and empowering others around me. His optimistic & mature perspective and hilarious nature always helped me find my way though all sorts of problems and challenges.  I could go on and on. So many good memories and so many things learned... Side note, I believe that Autodesk's Pier 9 will go down in history as the Xerox Parc of our modern day. So many talented people / things / concepts / ideas / pieces of knowledges come in and out of it, I don't know of any other place in the Bay I'd say is more innovative, cutting edge, open and inviting. Maybe Google X, Maybe Tesla / Space X... MAYBE.... Towards the middle/end of my residency when I was wrapping up projects, and new artists were coming in, I had this deep urge to help the new artists find their way just as the coordinators and other past artists had helped me find mine. Helping the new artists was one of the most satisfying things I did at the pier. I'd like to think my residency at Pier 9 has come full circle, but I think it even goes deeper than just my time at the Pier. I did my first instructable (as in I made someone else's creation) in 2007. Now 7 years laters, I hope that the instructables I have written and will write in the future will inspire young makers to keep making and eventually give back to their community in any way they can!  Thank you Pier 9, Thank you Instructables, Thank you Autodesk, Thank you fellow Artists. I will try to pay you back one day.  

Posted by syedrezaali 4 years ago | last reply 3 years ago


Not US residents able to win in Digital Days Photo Contest?

Thats it, are not US (and Canada) residents able to win the price? I'm from Spain

Posted by juanvi 9 years ago | last reply 9 years ago


Any simple crafts for nursing home residents?

Asked by sbubeck 9 years ago | last reply 9 years ago


Artists in Residence Exhibition at Pier 9

The annual Autodesk Artists in Residence Exhibition was held at Pier 9 in San Francisco from January 22-24, 2015. Check out some of the projects and learn more about the Artists in Residence (AiR) program here. (To see all AiR Instructables, follow the Artist in Residence group.) "Best art opening ever!" Some snaps from the evening: Photos by Brad Avery, Charlie Nordstrom, and Sherry Wong.

Posted by xxlauraxx 3 years ago


should I preorder resident evil 6 for the PS3 or preorder both heroes of ruin and Resident evil 6? Answered

I really want a good game that will keep me occupied during this summer; so what should I do get heroes of ruin and a 3DS headset  or get heroes of ruin and resident evil 6?

Asked by nerd7473 6 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


Cookie contest.... Excluding resident of QUEBEC. Why ho why are we excluded from the only contest I was sure to win??? Answered

Residents from Quebec are excuded from this and I guess other contest. I do not see why???

Asked by fbujold 6 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


Artist in Residence Opportunity in London (open to international applications)

Do you do art "for real"? There's an opportunity you might like: LINK The selected artist will be provided with accommodation, studio, stipend and a production budget towards new work. The artist will be selected from an open call, with the 4 month residency resulting in a public exhibition and publication in 2014. We are seeking applications from artists who have been working professionally for 5 years. We welcome international applications.  The residency includes a £2000 budget towards the production of new work, a £2000 stipend and up to £350 pounds towards travel expenses. Flat Time House will offer a self contained artist's residence with en-suite bathroom. Adjoining kitchen facilities are shared with FTHo's staff.  The deadline for applications is September 8 2013. The residency is to begin late November 2013 and run until late March 2014. 

Posted by Kiteman 5 years ago | last reply 5 years ago


Transformational experience for Instructables Artist-in-Residence

Instructables' Artist-in-Residence Mario Caicedo-Langer is pretty hands-on. He can make a robot out of anything, but was intrigued by the 123D suite of apps. I asked him to document his experience here... http://blog.123dapp.com/2013/04/transformational-experience-for-instructables-artist-in-residence It's pretty cool - the next step is printing the robot in one print, while still having moveable joints.

Posted by andrewt 5 years ago


How do I make a bubble wall? I work in a nursing home & want to improve the visual & auditory experience for residents.

We have a small room for this purpose and not much budget.  I want to build a bubble wall that the residents will enjoy.  Any ideas?

Asked by eebb 8 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


How do I make a bubble wall? I work in a nursing home and want to improve the visual experience of the residents. Answered

We have a small room where we want to have visual & auditory stimuli for residents in a nursing home.  Need info on how to make a bubble wall.

Asked by eebb 8 years ago | last reply 2 years ago


What say ye, Resident Physicist?

In which I ask Kelseymh his assessment of the experiment which they think may have detected neutrinos travelling faster than light. (Holy run-on sentence, Batman.) (Yes, I should have checked his orangeboard first...I'm a bad stalker. :P )

Posted by Lithium Rain 7 years ago | last reply 7 years ago


Contest not for Poles?

Hi I think this is a question for administrators/organisers the Deceptive Desserts Contest but if anyone knows the answer please let me know: Why residents of Poland are excluded from taking part in this contest? I am Pole and I would like take part in the competition, apparently I can't, just don't understand why. Are there some legal regulations? Or maybe I am misunderstanding below?? THE CONTEST IS OPEN ONLY TO NATURAL PERSONS WHO, AT THE TIME OF ENTRY, ARE REGISTERED MEMBERS OF THE SITE, WHO ARE AT LEAST THIRTEEN (13) YEARS OLD (FIFTEEN [15] YEARS OLD FOR RESIDENTS OF NORWAY AND EIGHTEEN [18] YEARS OLD FOR RESIDENTS OF GERMANY), AND NOT RESIDENTS OF ANY COUNTRY SUBJECT TO A US TRADE EMBARGO (AS OF APRIL 2014 NORTH KOREA, SYRIA, SUDAN, CUBA AND IRAN) AS WELL AS: BRAZIL, ITALY, ARGENTINA, TURKEY, ROMANIA, POLAND, OR THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC, CANADA. Thank you in advance, Marta

Asked by Ms Moneypenny 2 years ago | last reply 2 years ago


T-Virus Injection

How can I make something to give myself T-Virus injection marks? I'm looking for a way to give myself T-Virus injection marks, like Alice and Angela have in Resident Evil: Apocalypse, without actually injecting my self. The purpose would be for SDCC and eventually tattoos.

Posted by cjschen 8 years ago | last reply 8 years ago


Is there any chance entries for contests will be opened for Czech Republic?

At what conditions will be the entries opened for residents of Czech Republic. Thank you for answer.

Asked by kutil 3 years ago | last reply 3 years ago


can a greek resident enter your contest?

Hello, i am from Greece and have been a member here for a long time. I have entered a couple of contests but recently i read on the rules that greece is not in the listed countries. Does this mean that i cannot enter your contests or that even if i do enter i could never win any of the prizes ? Tjhank you in advance, Stathis

Asked by stathis stathatos 4 years ago | last reply 4 years ago


Why is that Puerto Rico residents are excluded from some of the contests?

I feel very disappointed and discriminated by instructables, after I was looking at the Make it Stick Contest 2, and the Epilog Challenge, and I find out that I can't participate, because Puerto Rico is excluded. Please I personally request some more information about this subject. 

Asked by skizzikpr 7 years ago | last reply 7 years ago


What exactly is "old people smell"? Answered

I would say one house in three with elderly residents seems to have that bitter staleness kind of smell. Cleanliness of the residents doesn't seem to effect if the smell is present, or how strong it is, so I wonder, what causes it? Can it be removed? Also, does our sense of smell lessen as we age, thus causing them not to notice? Inquiring minds want to know!

Asked by yokozuna 9 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


Popular Mechanics Takes a Tour of Pier 9

"Inside Instructables' Kooky, Creative Warehouse Wondershop" "There's a place where artists can create whatever they want, using the most advanced equipment on the planet. It's in San Francisco (of course). In a warehouse (of course)." Come read the article to hear more about the Pier and what some of the Artist in Residence are up to!

Posted by Penolopy Bulnick 4 years ago | last reply 4 years ago


Batch file zip

I need a batch file that will zip up text file with a password that resides on a network drive. Can some one help me with this?

Posted by computerguy 10 years ago | last reply 10 years ago


SecondLifeGlobal.com is looking for Second Life Residents!

Active Second Life Residents we need your help!We have just opened an ultra clean free open forum involving the MMOG Second Life here at http://www.secondlifeglobal.com .Be one of the first to post and start off the community!We would like you please to get involved and learn about Second Life. This is a great way to meet new players, enter cash contests,learn and post tips for newbies and buy, trade and sell amongst other Residents.There is no obligation to join free even. If you simply wish to use SecondLifeGlobal as a reference that is ok too. So take a second and see what we are all about and we hope to see as a part of the SecondLifeGlobal community!http://www.secondlifeglobal.comThank you for taking the time to view this thread.Sincerely,JohnSecondLifeGlobal.com

Posted by secondlifeglobal 11 years ago | last reply 11 years ago


Jayefuu as Instructables' Artist in Residence

Thursday saw the end of two of the most fun filled months of my life. Since the beginning of February I've been an artist in residence at Instructables' office in San Francisco. First impressions? The office was unlike any I'd ever visited or heard of. An open plan 2nd floor office above a deli and a night club on 2nd street, Instructables' headquarters is home to a team of 25 young and enthusiastic staff. It's not like your average software company either, no desk is the same and each is covered in or surrounded by a mix of complete and incomplete projects, or is in itself a project. Those above mentioned staff are all friendly. The office has the same tight knit community feeling that I have felt part of as a non-staff member using the site. As an artist in residence I was given no direction other than to be creative and pursue and finish projects that interested me. The environment was hugely beneficial as a maker. At home I feel that I have to explain why I want to make something. “But you can buy that!” I am often told. At Instructables I was surrounded by people who understand that making is a passion, that it's important and ideas quickly develop and grow as enthusiastic friends chime in with over the top but all too often adopted suggestions to improve projects in progress or create new projects. There doesn't need to be a reason to create something to amuse, educate or just show off. While in residence I worked on a bubble machine, a giant chess set to play in Eric and Christy's kitchen, an improved laser cut jenga pistol, a cupcake decorating stencil, several educational instructables as well as writing Perl to simplify several tedious admin tasks performed by the editors. My most used tool was the laser cutter. If I had to choose a favourite new skill that I learned, I'd be hard pressed to choose between the skills I developed with a DSLR and lighting, and how to drive a forklift. The best piece of insider information I picked up.... I know who the next artist in residence will be! Given a chance, I'll definitely be back. I love the staff, I love the city and the nearby climbing is exceptional! James

Posted by Jayefuu 6 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


Instructables on New Scientist TV

Instructables "artist in residence" Mikeasaurus has had his magnetic silly putty featured on New Scientist TV. Kudos, Mike!

Posted by Kiteman 7 years ago | last reply 7 years ago


anyone know why the latest contest Video Instructables is off limits to CA residents? Answered

Just curious what the reason is - especially since two of the sponsors are CA businesses

Asked by shumaker 6 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


Californians excluded from Jack Daniel's contest

I noticed that residents of California are excluded from the Jack Daniels contest - bummer! Does anyone know why? Thanks :)

Posted by LanceMakes 6 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


Countries allowed to participate contests

Contest rules says: "THE CONTEST IS OPEN ONLY TO NATURAL PERSONS WHO, AT THE TIME OF ENTRY, ARE REGISTERED MEMBERS OF THE SITE, WHO ARE AT LEAST FOURTEEN (14) YEARS OLD (FIFTEEN [15] YEARS OLD FOR RESIDENTS OF NORWAY AND EIGHTEEN [18] YEARS OLD FOR RESIDENTS OF GERMANY), AND ARE LEGAL RESIDENTS OF THE 50 UNITED STATES (INCLUDING THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA BUT EXCLUDING PUERTO RICO), CANADA (EXCLUDING THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC, CANADA), UNITED KINGDOM, AUSTRALIA, BELGIUM, CHINA, THE NETHERLANDS, COLOMBIA, DENMARK, GERMANY, INDIA, NORWAY, OR SWITZERLAND." So, I just want to ask, why citizens of Poland cannot participate to contests? I'm sure, there a lot Polish, who made something nice and would show his/her project in that way. Poland is in EU, NATO, it is not so bad country (until you live there, eh). Our politicians sucks, thats a fact, but there are a lot creative young people, let them show, what they can. Regards. p.

Posted by cube000 5 years ago | last reply 5 years ago


Resident Beehives, indoor bees?

I was watching an episode of "how it's made", they were covering commercial tomato's.  The plants were grown in a large building and the plants were pollinated by a in house beehive.  The hive was kept separate from the plants, but the bee's had access through some tubing and a hole in the wall.  Everything I've read suggests that having bee's pollinate your indoor plants is a bad idea.  I'm pretty sure most of these comments are coming from hobbyists, but the claim is that the bees get lost indoors and usually die as a result.  Can anyone enlighten me on the subject?

Asked by Spaceman Spiff 5 years ago | last reply 5 years ago


Can I participate in your contests?

Sorry for my English, I don't use it very often. I'm from Europe, from Spain and I love your web, but I don't know if I can participate in your constest. I have read the new rules: "Eligibility. THE CONTEST IS OPEN ONLY TO NATURAL PERSONS WHO, AT THE TIME OF ENTRY, ARE REGISTERED MEMBERS OF THE SITE, WHO ARE AT LEAST FOURTEEN (14) YEARS OLD (FIFTEEN [15] YEARS OLD FOR RESIDENTS OF NORWAY AND EIGHTEEN [18] YEARS OLD FOR RESIDENTS OF GERMANY), AND ARE LEGAL RESIDENTS OF THE 50 UNITED STATES (INCLUDING THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA BUT EXCLUDING PUERTO RICO), CANADA (EXCLUDING THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC, CANADA), UNITED KINGDOM, AUSTRALIA, BELGIUM, CHINA, THE NETHERLANDS, COLOMBIA, DENMARK, GERMANY, INDIA, NORWAY, OR SWITZERLAND." In my country, your are an adult if you are 18 years old. I'm older, so I haven't this problem. But my country, Spain, doesn't appear in your list. Can we participate? Or there is some problem with the post or the laws to send the prices? Thank for your time!

Posted by Nemra 6 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


LG's Design the Future Competition

Call for entries! Your assignment: imagine the future of mobile communication. LG Mobile Phones is partnering with crowdSPRING to announce a new competition to define the next generation of mobile communication.  If you are a U.S. resident (citizen or green card holder) age 18 (or age of majority in state of residence) and older, you can have a chance to design your vision of the next revolutionary LG mobile phone and compete for more than $80,000 in awards.  Exercise your creative imagination and let your ideas be heard.  You don’t have to work for LG to make an impact on the future of mobile communication! www.crowdspring.com/LG

Posted by jdaudier 8 years ago


How do I keep ferrofluid from staining glass?

I need to keep ferrofluid from staining the glass container it resides in. The fluid will be in the container for a long time, so the solution has to last a long time as well.

Asked by 9 years ago


Reflections on Pier 9 Residency

My residency on the Pier lasted from January through June 2014, a total of six incredibly busy months, during which time I built a 3D printer with an un-bounded build volume and a low cost metal laser sintering 3D printer. It took nearly three months to learn to handle the overwhelming potential of each new day on the Pier. The Pier is such a focal point of creative energy and flux-- every day the Pier hosts thought leaders in design, fabrication, art, and engineering. I've never seen such a critical density of talent. In the residency program, I had the unique opportunity to collaborate with fashion designers, furniture makers, illustrators, and other engineers with a freedom and agility that I've never seen anywhere else. In one of many sudden collaborations, Anouk Wipprecht returned from a trip to LA and showed me an SLS 3D printed tentacle that she was considering using in a dress she was designing. I began thinking about FDM-printable compliant mechanisms and designed a tentacle more compatible with the fabrication process. Mikaela Holmes then saw the tentacles that I was printing and based on her input, I ran a couple more iterations. She then showed Paolo Salvagione these more developed designs, who in turn took it even further by adding servo-actuation to automate the piece's motion. Mikaela then iterated on the concept for several weeks, and settled on a multimaterial Objet fabrication process to make her amazing blossoming headdress. This kind of interaction could only have happened in the residency program. The other striking thing about the Pier is the learning infrastructure that surrounds each machine and process. Residents can get trained up on a machine under the instruction of the shop staff who have put together amazing documentation surrounding each machine (just see Dan Vidokavich's Haas VF-2SS video series). Tools, it turns out, aren't very useful unless you know how to use them and the Pier is full of extremely knowledgeable folks who always teaching through even the smallest actions. It's a very positive and healthy culture of always giving each other a hand. I have also never encountered so much support for realizing such personal projects. Noah Weinstein and Vanessa Sigurdson made sure no obstacle was insurmountable. When I needed to move my 3D metal printer prototype briefly off the Pier, Noah immediately located additional space and helped me move my prototype that weekend. Julia Cabral, Autodesk's environmental health and safety officer was also an amazing resource and advisor to my metal printer project, which involved high voltage, high powered lasers, explosive materials, and pressurized gases. Not only did Julia do tons of research to advise on proper sealing, venting, material selection, and gas sensing techniques, she also helped me draw up all the associated safety protocols for operating the prototype machine. I'd recommend the residency program to artists, designers, and engineers alike. The human and fabrication resources tare unparalleled and reside in a spectacular culture based on respect, openness, and mutual support.

Posted by andreasbastian 4 years ago | last reply 4 years ago


Jack Daniel's "The Independence Project" Eligibility

I was excited to pull together a video for the Jack Daniel's challenge, but then I noticed the small text at the end of the contest description: "...Void in CA and where prohibited."  Why the heck are residents of California exempt from participating in this contest?

Posted by ridiculously.awesome 6 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


How can I show a video clip in an instructable when the clip resides on Facebook?

The original video is gone in a computer crash but we still have the 25 second clip on the unpublished instructable Author's Facebook page and on mine (collaborator)

Asked by Woodenbikes 7 years ago | last reply 7 years ago


Being an Artist in Residence at Pier 9: MORE IS BETTER

My second one month term as Artist in Residence at Pier 9 was a blast, again. Now I’m back home, the jet lag is behind me and the making rush is replaced by the rush of “ordinary” life. Time for a short “retrospect” What remained the same compared to the first time, is being torn between spending as much time as possible in the awesome workshop, interacting with creative soul mates (both AIRs and Autodesk/Instructables people, all very creative and very busy themselves) and the lures of San Francisco, a city that brings the whole world to one place. What has changed that there is even more of the good stuff. When I did my first one month term as AIR, in July 2013, Instructables had just moved to Pier 9 and the workshop was brand new. Now the workshop is fully operational, with some more machines even. There is a very professional training program in place, with very good and passionate trainers, quickly learning you how to work with the machines. In July 2013 we were 4 artists, Now, April-May 2015, fulltime and part time artist together we where about 30! That high concentration of creative people, with a wide range of interests and skills, really gives a vibe. It is clear both Instructables and the Artist in Residence program thrive in the environment made possible by Autodesk. It is fantastic to see how this company believes in giving creativity the means to materialise in the widest range of projects. I’m very grateful for the chance to share in that. I did five different blimp projects, two as workshops for children, which was absolutely great. I added five new sub projects to my laser cut advent calendar project and was able to make the advent calendar itself. Clearly, I have a lot of material for Instructables. So more is better. To bad for me I can only come for one month at a time (because of family and work reasons). One month is terribly short and so is two months. I crave for more ;-) Cheers and thanks to all you lucky people at Pier 9, Yvon a.k.a. masynmachien

Posted by masynmachien 3 years ago | last reply 3 years ago


biodiesel fuel shed concept

This is a Biodiesel Fuel Shed concept i thought of. It would be partly underground, have an exhaust hood, and a wet chemical sprinkler system. I thought of it for safety of the user/s in the shed, and also safety for the residents in the houses in the blast radius itf there were to be a catastrophic failure.

Posted by theboygenius 5 years ago | last reply 5 years ago


can some one make the matilda from re4? Answered

Im wondering if anyone can make the matilda from resident evil 4 i would kill to have a knex of this must be low part count as i dont have that many pieces i would appreciate if this was made scott8692

Asked by scott8692 9 years ago | last reply 8 years ago


produce electicity in a bicycle to charge a cell phone or i pod?

Im from india, residing in chennai. im in my high school. i have an idea of producing electricty from my bicycle to charge small devices like cell phone or an i pod.     can someone guide me to the right way ??????????

Asked by kind 6 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


Contest to win a PC

Someone PM'd me about a contest to create something new with their old PC.  I was going to enter but unfortunately it is only open to US residence.  I thought I would pass this along since there are a lot of Instructables posted that would be eligible for this contest (provided that you are from the US).  The prize is a PC. Here is the link: http://vizio.maker.good.is/

Posted by ChrysN 6 years ago | last reply 6 years ago


Talking about my Summer

I have to admit that I was skeptical before starting my Residency at Instructables. I never felt comfortable calling myself a "Maker" and here I was, walking into the belly of the beast at Pier 9. I felt like the term "Maker" was starting to read as cold, technical, robotic and...frankly...stuff really geared towards young boys. I felt as though I was coming into the program as a spy, an outsider looking to infiltrate and be critical of the hype around 3D printing. My project was really my attempt to talk openly about how I felt about these things in a way that people who design and use these machines might take notice. I was expecting to walk into an office full of dudes that wanted to make crazy things just because they could but I was created by quite another experience. The other AiRs were all interesting, questioning, infiltrating. The entire company was full of creative, open-minded, artsty folk and I can't tell you how good it felt to be in the electronics lab one day with all these different amazing and creative women coming in and out. I end my residency (the full-time part anyway) with a different attitude and the realization that people are pretty open-minded, excited and down-right nice! I never imagined people would go to the lengths they did just to help see the project along and it felt great to help and encourage others to see their ideas though. I think I leave the summer with a few new friends. On my presentation day, I felt like I wanted people to sign my year-book - it's that kind of place.   My favorite thing about the residency was also made the residency difficult. The space and people are so interesting and engaging that conversations start all the time. It's so great, but also makes it really hard to get work done! There is so much going on that its hard to stay on top of what people are working on - especially with the residents that aren't around everyday. It would be interesting to find ways to facilitate feedback and collaboration in different ways. We do an exercise in a class I help with at Berkeley where people put their projects on the wall and the other students add post-its with feedback. Maybe if we had a wall like that in the Air-ea it could be a way to keep tabs of all the work and also give short snippets of feedback without interrupting someone's flow. It wouldn't be a way to replace other ways of sharing what we're working on, but a sounding board for just quick, "have you seen X" kind of ideas.  I can't say thank you enough. I had a great, productive summer and I'm excited to be sticking around for a bit longer and seeing the new AiRs that come in and out. I would (and have) recommend the program to anyone - it was a really wonderful experience!

Posted by ldevendorf 4 years ago | last reply 4 years ago