Can you make a clothes wringer?

I would love to have a wringer for use when dying fabrics, but just can't afford to buy a new one. The antique wringers often have damaged rollers, but they can cost as much or more than a new one.

Question by dulciquilt 10 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


An idea for an alternative cloth wringer

I'm thinking about a new design for a cloth wringer like function. A product that will squeeze your cloth from water. Not pointing out any imperfections from a generic cloth wringer shown in the first picture but its just a thought of designing a new one since some say that the current mechanism of a cloth wringer doesn't do the job effectively or there is a separate need for a bucket for it to be attached. Anyway, the design I'm thinking of is to solve any problems that is experienced by a normal cloth wringer.I'm thinking of a new design that would include a tube that would let you insert your desired cloth and a separate cloth absorber that would absorb the water when you squeeze the tube. A picture of a tube would look like the second picture (taken from the internet, youtube aa product called "Easy Squeezy" by Vitility). However its mechanism isn't the same as the idea I have but its physical appearance is kind of the same. I can't make a new one since I still don't know how it would look like based on the mechanism I have in mind.The Easy Squeezer's mechanism includes two separate tubes and you'll need to insert your cloth inside the inner tube and close it by another tube. Then you'll need to apply a force directly into the tube so you'll be able to squeeze out the water from your cloth. As shown from the youtube demonstration video (Link:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--tHZRMjk3Q)Thus, an idea came up and the mechanism I have in mind is you'll need the tubes just like from the "Easy Squeezer" and a separate absorbing cloth (preferrably a microfiber one). Then, you'll need to roll your wet cloth along with the microfiber cloth and insert it into the tube. After you've inserted the two rolled clothes into the tubes the mechanism would allow you to create a twisting force into the tubes and ultimately squeeze most of the water from the wet cloth while preserving an uncreased cloth. Which is illustrated from the fourtth picture. Generally, you can do the twisting yourself even without the tubes but it would take a great effort to squeeze and make it a tedious job when you're going to do it for a large amount of wet clothes. The mechanism I have in mind is for the tubes' ability to translate a larger torque (or twisting moment) into the tubes while only having to exert little force. However, the problem is I don't know how to start in the design. Any ideas and suggestions on how to improve?

Question by CzarLuc123145 7 weeks ago  |  last reply 6 weeks ago