Cafe Press - noob question

Right, I'm trying to raise a bit of pin-money with cafepress, but I'm confused, and I can't seem to find the answer to my question in the FAQ system there.I want to sell the same items (t-shirts and hats), but with a variety of images.Somehow, that does not seem possible. I can only sell one item with one image. I can't seem to add the same item again, but with a different image.I know I'm probably missing something obvious, but does anybody else know enough about cafepress to help me?(Note - to prevent accusations of spam, I will PM the shop's URL to anybody that asks for it, rather than posting it in the thread)Humorous note - my Firefox spell-checker wants to change "cafepress" to "depressants"

Posted by Kiteman 10 years ago


which do you prefer

Which do you prefer you tube or metacafe? i prefer you tube well because i do.

Posted by Easy Button 11 years ago


What the heck!

Ok so i was going on meta cafe to look at the laser pointer video, and then something popped up saying meta cafe was an adult site and it was going to block it. But there was a choice and i said no but does anyone know why that happend?

Posted by Easy Button 10 years ago


*More* New Kiteman Products

I just thought folk might like to know that I am updating my CafePress shop. It's got all the usual CafePress items, decorated with original images based on my Instructables. So far, Complete Kiteman just has Poong Stick and Cardboard Frisbee items, but there are other Kiteman items available, which I am going to gather together into sections of Complete Kiteman. As ever, if there are designs or items you want me to add to the store, just add a comment here or drop me a PM. Update - now available: Poong Stick Cardboard Frisbee The Law Fallen Star Paper catapult Viking catapult Heed the Box Entwined Hearts Pixel Climbing Gorilla

Posted by Kiteman 7 years ago


Time for another SF Make Out

I'm holding another "Make Out" making in public event this Thursday, April 21st at the Amsterdam Cafe in San Francisco. What is it: It's a casual meet up to work on projects, share ideas, brainstorm, meet people, or just drink beer and chat. (Amsterdam cafe has around 300 beers available.) (They also have really good coffee, tea, and wine if beer isn't your thing.)  Bring a project if you have one (and it's appropriate to have it in a public cafe.  So no flame throwers or full-sized space ships.) Or just bring yourself.  Last time we had a full range of bakers, craters, hackers, technologists, and the curious and it was a really great time. When: April 21 from 5pm to 8pm (though it may run longer.) Where: Amsterdam Cafe, 937 Geary street, San Francisco [map] [web site] I'll be the guy playing with LEDs and Arduinos. Cost: Free!  (Though Kelly, the lovely owner of Amsterdam cafe would appreciate it if you bought something to drink and tipped well.) Who: Everyone is welcome. More details are here.

Posted by Grathio 7 years ago


San Francisco Public Making Meet Up #3

I'm holding another "Make Out" making in public event this Thursday, June 2nd at the Amsterdam Cafe in San Francisco. It's a casual meet up to work on projects, share ideas, brainstorm, meet people, or just drink beer and chat. (Amsterdam cafe has around 300 beers available.) (They also have really good coffee, tea, and wine if beer isn't your thing.) Bring a project or just bring yourself. In the past we've had everything from crafts to robots to baking.  Last time we looked forward to Maker Faire, so I expect we'll talk a lot about our Maker Faire expereinces. When: June 2 from 5pm to 8pm (though it may run longer.) Where: Amsterdam Cafe, 937 Geary street, San Francisco [map] [web site] I'll be the guy playing with LEDs and Arduinos. Cost: Free! (Though Kelly, the lovely owner of Amsterdam cafe would appreciate it if you bought something to drink and tipped well.) Who: Everyone is welcome. More details are here. 

Posted by Grathio 7 years ago


Kruser495's Shop!

Take a look at some of my shops at cafe press. these are only a few of my designs! Come to the dark side!seals!salad fingers!Lamas!More Lamas!ArthritisMore Salad Fingers!Check it out!

Posted by DELETED_DELETED_kruser495 10 years ago


Flash Mob Dance Party in Shibuya

Shibuya is an awesome neighborhood in Japan with loads of shops and cafes to hang out in. It is also home to the Busiest Intersection in the World. That's exactly where this video takes place. Fun to see the sudden-choreographed-dance-party-in-the-street pop up in different places.

Posted by fungus amungus 9 years ago


Whats your favorite coffee shop?

 Add your favorite: coffee shop, cafe, place, and even your favorite drink to get there!  If its a gastation, add the location and name of it! If you add a picture, i will add it to the pictures on this topic! don't forget to join the llcoffee group!  

Posted by J@50n 8 years ago


I'm Leaving for Chelan

I'm leaving for Lake Chelan tomorrow morning. Just to let you know. The five hour drive will be nothing compared to the eleven hour drive I had to take last week (both ways). I won't have access to Internet unless I visit an internet cafe, so see you the 24th!

Posted by Spl1nt3rC3ll 10 years ago


Got any recomendations for webservers,advertising services, ?

Ok so I have been working on a website for a day or two now and I am ready to put advertisements on my website. So I was wondering if you guys and girls knew of any good advertising programs ? My website is called AWASTEOFTIME.CA It consists of a chat room, games, LOTS OF GAMES, and you tube and meta cafe videos. So one of my advertising methods will be meta cafe. And any recomendations on web servers and where to get a domain name. ( free would be nice At the moment i don't care if it ends up to be www.awasteoftime.(companys name here).ca Eventually i will pay for a domain and webspace but I would like to make the project self supported (Hmm i see an instructable in the mere future)) So what do you guys use for your websites ?

Posted by littlechef37 10 years ago


Café Twin Arts and Science Community Advisory

Http://cafetwinctv.blogspot.com/ Cafe Twin Community TV Show__ A Bridge to Music and Science with conversation and project development on a community level and via community twining as demonstrated post World War II in Europe with leadership from France and Germany Twitter ID: waldenthreenet

Posted by cafetwin 5 years ago


I'm back!

In the past month I've been scratching my itch to travel. I've been hiking in Japan, exploring Morocco, and relaxing in Parisian cafes and museums. So if you didn't see me around these parts it's because I wasn't around these parts. No new trips coming up, but getting outside of the US is always fun and I hope to do it again soon. But now I'm back! I'm looking forward to digging through what's been going on here in the past couple weeks and finding new things to make or do.

Posted by fungus amungus 9 years ago


Any better idea for FLOOD in Bangkok ?

PRACTICAL IDEAS  PANTIP.COM : NE11292225 ภาพขำๆ นวัตกรรมใหม่ สู้ภัยน้ำท่วม ( แก้เครียด ) [วิกฤตน้ำท่วม] http://www.pantip.com/cafe/news/topic/NE11292225/NE11292225.html

Posted by park47 6 years ago


Savannah Show and Tell Report

We had some nice projects at the show and tell. Small crowd, but enthusiastic. We had a wall-hanging piece of art/network firewall, a salvaged and modded electric scooter, a homemade drill, my little USB charging flashlight, and an ornithopter flying across the cafe. We took turns riding the scooter around the parking lot and ate a few snack cakes. It was fun seeing everyone's ingenuity in one spot. And by everyone, I mean both of us. It was great. And I got to keep all the leftover snacks! Thanks for the stickers; I handed out quite a few of them. All in all, it was a great success. Looking to see more people and more resourcefulness at the next show and tell.

Posted by royalestel 11 years ago


Ask a Scientist [topic: ancient science]

Topic: The 2000-Year-Old Computer (and Other Achievements of Ancient Science)We learn in school that the science of our ancestors included such endearing bunk as flat planets, geocentric solar systems, and the balancing of the body's four humors. (Even the pre-internet decades of my youth now seem to me like a dark, distant era of ignorance that I can't believe we all survived.) Did our ancient predecessors get anything right? Of course they did. Tonight, science historian Richard Carrier will discuss the nature and limitations of ancient science.While crucial contributions have come from many different cultures throughout history, Richard will talk about a handful of Graeco-Roman scientific and technological advances that might surprise you. Here's a teaser: we'll learn about the Antikythera mechanism, the oldest known computer discovered in a 2000-year-old shipwreck near Crete (pictured below). Cool.ABOUT THE SERIES: Ask a Scientist is an informative, entertaining, casual science lecture series, held at a San Francisco cafe. Each event features a speaker on a current topic, a short presentation, and the opportunity to ask all those burning questions that have been keeping you up at night. No tests, grades, or pressure, just food, drinks, socializing, and conversation about the universe's most fascinating mysteries. February 26, 200807:00 PM - 09:00 PMCost: FreeLocation: MapAxis Cafe1201 8th Street (btw. 16th & Irwin)San Francisco, CA 94107Additional Info:http://www.askascientistsf.com/

Posted by noahw 10 years ago


Ask a Scientist Special Event: Phat Tuesday Physics Circus

Come join ringmaster Zeke Kossover and his crew of sensational sideshow scientists as they (and YOU) perform dazzling demonstrations that illustrate physical principles! Watch, and listen, as sound shatters a wine glass! Ride a hovercraft! Turn on an electric pickle! Try to look at invisible glass! Witness the stopping of time! (Ok, not time exactly, but the hands of a watch.) Zeke and his crew will astound, amaze and explain, every step of the way. Can you think of a more appropriate way to celebrate Mardi Gras, than sledgehammering a bed of nails into the chest of a physics teacher from New Orleans? I sure can't!RINGMASTER: Zeke Kossover, physics teacher at Jewish Community High School of the Bay.THE CREW: Tucker Hiatt, physics teacher at The Branson School and director of Wonderfest; Leif Steinhour, Constructor, One Off Shoppe.WHEN: Tuesday, February 5th, 7:00 pm WHERE: Axis Cafe, 1201 8th Street (btw. 16th & Irwin) Ask a Scientist recommends that you come early to make sure that you get a good view.http://askascientistSF.com

Posted by noahw 10 years ago


Black & Decker Bandsaw, Model DN330-H2 Manual.

Hi Folks. I have posted this in questions but that was two days ago & it still has not appeared so I figured it wouldn't hurt to try in the forums as well. The following appeared on the Cafe pages of my local FreeGle group this morning & I wondered if anyone in the wonderful world of Instructables could help. Ladies & Gentlemen I've acquired a Black & Decker Bandsaw, Model DN330-H2. It would be very helpful to have a copy of the instruction manual and I should be most grateful if anybody who has the manual for a similar model would allow me to have a copy. I've used bandsaws in the past but it would be really useful to know how the manufacturer suggests that blades are fitted and tensioned. I've tried the B&D; website and all I can find is an "exploded" diagram and a parts list. If anyone has a copy of the manual for this or any other bandsaw in the Black & Decker DN330 range in a format they could email me or perhaps a link to a web site it would be truly appreciated. All the best. N.G.

Posted by Nostalgic Guy 6 years ago


Spotted!

Seen anything interesting in traffic lately?I recently sat along our town's main cruising street and counted how many motorcycles went by. 15 in an hour. That's up from when gas was cheaper! We'll see about when winter gets here, though.One of my professors has a Triumph 900, the classic-looking one. He wants to get rid of it. He wants to trade for a Harley. I don't have a Harley. It's still his.One of the security guards nearly took his own head off on his sportbike of unknown bloodline by coming screaming around a corner and almost clipping the No Parking sign.On my way home, a very nicely done cafe racer that looked like a modern-parts Vincent passed me on the highway.On the way across town, we were at a light next to a long, low, and loud chopper, with an ultradetailed paintjob.A few months ago, we were at a light when a '24 Harley went by on the cross street.I have a bike that can move under it's own power, which you have all seen if you've read about my custom seat at https://www.instructables.com/id/Build_a_motorcycle_seat/Seven Road KingsFive scooters, two of which were of the sewing-machine, park-on-the-sidewalk-and-piss-us-all-off sortTwo Victorys"And a partridge in a pear tree"

Posted by Rishnai 9 years ago


Oil: $100 per Barrel

Twas bound to happen - so why not open the new year with a new high?http://money.cnn.com/2008/01/02/markets/oil/index.htm?postversion=2008010212U.S. crude for February delivery jumped $4.02 to $100 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange before slipping to $99.42. The previous trading record was $99.29 set Nov. 20. Oil prices ended 2007 by gaining nearly 60 percent for the year, the largest jump this decade."This market is really gonna fly," Ira Eckstein, president of Area International Trading Corp, said from the NYMEX floor.In Nigeria, bands of armed men invaded Port Harcourt, the center the oil industry Tuesday, attacking two police stations and raiding the lobby of a major hotel, The Associated Press reported. Four policemen, three civilians and six attackers were killed. The Niger Delta Vigilante Movement claimed responsibility for the attack.At 2.1 million barrels per day, Nigeria was the world's eighth-largest oil exporter in 2006, according to the U.S. Energy Information Agency.Furthermore, the auto manufacturers are saying the new CAFE standards (35mpg for cars) are a very expensive goals. Mind you, there's cars 20+ years ago that exceeded this standard (CRX got in the mid 50mpg range).Futurama did elude to $100 per gallon of gas in New York city by 2012... How could they be wrong? :D

Posted by trebuchet03 10 years ago


Raw Living Food - Plant Based

Anyone familiar with Raw Vegan Food - or Plant-Based Lifestyle? Yeah, when I first heard it, I thought the same thing...but for health reasons was advised to explore this arena. I got bored...quickly, and so I started seeking out ways of making this healthy way of eating...FUN! I ended up falling in love with eating raw vegan! I have so much more energy than before, and so many of my gastro intestinal symptoms were alleviated. (Bloating, gas, cramping, etc). On top of this, chronic sinusitis and insomnia cleared up..oh, and my SKIN!!!  The fact is, it started out as a "must do" and ended up as a LOVE. I am now a self-taught "chef" but mostly a recipe developer and challenge myself to come up with treats that are as decadent as the original cooked and processed version...only healthy and guilt free. I did it!! I've created brownies and a line of cookies. I make kale chips in every flavor imaginable, including Chocolate, which was featured on Oprah.com, and sold in my online cafe. I can create crackers, breads, and chips, mousse and cheesecakes, and the list goes on. Right now, I'm working on a chocolate layer cake that is chewy and fudgy and unbelievably decadent!!! The excitement I feel when I create something others can enjoy is thrilling!  PS I've tried adding images multiple times with no luck!!! 2.5 years ago, I'd never have imagined myself eating to GOOD and so HEALTHY...and enjoying it all so much!  Just wondering if there are other raw foodies out there?   

Posted by Rawfully Tempting 6 years ago


Back from the Big Peach

Back from Ole Southey, The Sweaty Apple, Ted Turners Bidet. Yep, talking about Atlanta Ga. and thanks to the interweb I can annoy millions with my travel log.If you like you can check out my pix, I took over 1400, but didn't put all of them online, sorry about the low quality and the image tag, I get tired of finding my pix on other's pages.So my wife and I stayed in an inexpensive best western in midtown, alright hotel, great location, thin walls.We visited the Ga Aquarium, we were underwhelmed, perhaps spoiled by multiple trips to the Shedd Aquarium we were disappointed in that it took only three hours to tour the whole facility, TWICE. The whale sharks are cool, but the cafe is to be avoided, the "burgers" I ordered still had ice in the middle.The Atlanta Botanical Garden is an absolute jewel, I've visited dozens of gardens and this one tops the list, the highlight being the Fuqua Conservatory where you share the environs with poison arrow frogs, along with an outstanding orchid house.The High Museum, is hard to judge, we visited the special exhibits only, it was interesting to see a Rembrandt in person, and the Annie Leibowitz gallery was nice.The Fernbank Museum of Natural History, this one I sadly say, pass on. I LIKE dioramas and natural history museums, but without the Imax movie, it would have taken 45 minutes tops to see the whole thing.Finally the Zoo, a must visit, be sure to visit on a week day, Atlanta seems to be populated entirely with soccer moms witha sense of entitlement and double wide strollers. The zoo has pandas, but the red pandas have greater charm and charisma to them, and you don't need a special ticket.FoodThe only restaurant we dined at worth noting was the South City Kitchen, the food was so good you'll mourn that you will never eat that good again, the She Crab Soup and Catfish Ruben are delicious.And Weissenheimer hambergerler, PM me, Okay ?

Posted by Tool Using Animal 10 years ago


Cheap and Easy Homemade Chai Latte'

I paid $3 for my first mug of Chai Latte' in one of those fancy internet cafe's. It was love at first sip, but I didn't have $3 for every time i craved another mug. I tried a number of powdered and liquid mixes, but couldn't find anything cheap enough for me. Then I found (and modified) a recipe for making it at home, and many who have tasted it say it's better than Starbucks. I drink as much as I want now without guilt! Here's the simple recipe: In a sauce pan, combine 2 C. water, 2 regular tea bags, 1/8-1/4 t. EACH of ground ginger and cardamon, 1 whole clove, and one cinnamon stick. Boil for 5 minutes. Then add 1/4 c. sugar (or 6 Splenda pkts.), and 2 1/2 C. milk. Bring to a boil, strain (if desired) and serve. Notes: 1. If you purchase your spices at the grocery store, you'll pay a bundle. You can get most of them at Gordon Food Service or similar places. Cardamon will be harder to find in a quantity. I have had lots of luck, though, at health food stores. You can purchase it by weight in small quantities and pay a fraction of the grocery store price. (A jar of cardamon at the store was $11 - the same quantity at the health food store was less than $2.) 2. Did you know that cinnamon sticks don't get "used up" very quickly? I used to throw the cinnamon stick away after each batch of chai - what a waste! Now I rinse it when I'm done and give it a sniff - if it smells cinnamon-y, it still has flavor to impart. In this recipe, you can reuse your cinnamon sticks 3-4 times - maybe more! 3. Variations: If you want a more dessert-like beverage, top off your chai with a dallop of whipped cream and sprinkle with nutmeg - YUM! Also, it can be made more or less rich by varying what kind of milk you use (skim or whole) or even replacing some of the milk with cream. Making homemade chai might not make you rich, but it will make the lean times taste a lot better! Enjoy!

Posted by treep1 9 years ago


What accessory or attachment, that doesn't exist today, would you love to see in your dream netbook?

Asus, a sponsor of Instructables, has put together WePC where they are asking for input on their next generation laptops. As part of their sponsorship, they've asked my opinion on various aspects of laptops. Most recently What accessory or attachment, that doesn't exist today, would you love to see in your dream netbook?.Here are two things I would love to have integrated into a netbook: internal power adapter and standard wireless accessories.I don't think anyone really carries a netbook to cafes, on airplanes, or wherever and cavalierly leaves their power adapter at home. Some people don't even leave without their phone's power adapter -- the risk to reward ratio is just too great. So, with lower power consumption and better power management of netbooks, I'd like to see one with an integrated power adapter. It should plug directly into 120 VAC with an integrated cord, or use a standard power adapter cord. Just because people are used to having a separate power adapter, doesn't mean it's the right thing. Once one manufacturer does it, the rest will need to follow suit.A netbook is great for carrying around and working, but eventually most users will take it home or to the office, and want to use any number of accessories that make their work more comforatble: external keyboard and mouse, second monitor, USB headset or microphone, cell phone cable, etc... Both at home and at my office, I have USB hubs setup to handle all the things I need to plug into my laptop. The cables are ugly, collect, dust, and get in the way. I preferentially buy wireless devices when possible, but they still require a USB port for their receivers. My dream netbook would wirelessly pair with my peripherals through Bluetooth or some other standard, leaving my USB ports free for stuff that really needs them. What's your dream accessory? Let me know here, and leave a comment or idea on WePC. If it's good enough, they just might make it...Finally, I'd like to know what you have thought about this Asus campaign. If you would be kind enough to take this survey, I would really appreciate it. Comments here are also good. Thanks!

Posted by ewilhelm 9 years ago


Art Outside 2009 | 3-Day Art & Music Festival

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION ENDS SEPT. 14thHigh-tech wizardry. Make-and-take craft tables. Fire dancing. Eco-chic fashion. Film shorts by creators such as Don Hertzfeldt, Run Wrake, and Andy Gately of Austin Underground Film Festival. With 50+ concerts on three different stages. Whatever your artistic want is, we've got it! And to get it, all you have to do is step outside.One of Texas' most anticipated annual art events. Presented by Art Seen Alliance, Art Outside's three-day art and music festival happens this year October 9-11th. Nestled inside the beautiful grounds of Apache Pass, located just East of Austin and centered between Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio, Art Outside brings you over 100 artists across all media. From visual artists like Meres One, Casey Warr, and Joe DiPrima of ArcAttack, to musical sets by The Vandelles, Suzanna Choffel, Fort Knox Five, Freq Nasty Santogold's producer and collaborator, and many more. Including live performances by Firegroove, Reggie Watts, and Helios Jive with interactive earth friendly projects for kids, storytelling, and stand-up comedy, Art Outside offers creative thrills for everyone. Gates Open: Friday, October 9th at noon. 3-day passes are now available for Art Outside attendees. All children 12 and under will receive free admission. In addition to camping grounds for full-weekend participants, Apache Pass offers RV parking, music performance areas, a cantilevered stage, artist tents, and on-site shower facilities. Apache Pass camp grounds will allow families, small parties, and singles to experience an all-out art and music adventure, so indulge your creative spirit during the day, and sleep under the stars at night.Check out the full lineup here: http://www.artoutside.org*visit website for full line-up/line-up is subject to changes, additions & modifications.As if live music, interactive art activities, film and comedy are not enough, Art Outside attendees can also enjoy drinks by Treaty Oak Rum and food by Austin's Spider House Cafe, Cheer-Up Charlies vegan treats, Ararat Middle East fusion cuisine, and goodies by The Happy Vegan Baker. Sponsors for this event are Dr. Bronner's, The Onion, Montana Paint, and MAKE Magazine.Tickets will sell fast, so to reserve your spot for Art Outside visit: https://beticketing.com/_U2_add.php?eid=100909AOWith a tradition of showcasing groundbreaking talent on breathtaking grounds, Art Outside has hosted artists and art appreciators since 2004. Founded on the grounds of Austin's own Enchanted Forest, Art Outside began as a small gathering of creative souls, and has expanded into a destination event for visitors near and far. To learn more, please visit http://www.artoutside.orgExperience the art, OUTSIDE!The AO09 Team|Art Seen Alliance http://www.artseenalliance.com

Posted by electricpromotions 8 years ago


Instructables Show & Tell- in our town, and yours

Come to the first Instructables Show & Tell near you this March! Held in the Bay Area (Friday 3/9, 7pm at Instructables HQ), the Boston area (Saturday 3/10, 7pm, hosted by MITERS), Austin (Saturday 3/10 at SXSW, hosted by dorkbot ), NYC (Thursday 3/22, hosted by Etsy, Make, PopSci, and Create Digital Music) , Atlanta (Friday 3/30, 8pm), Savannah (Thursday, 3/22), and Orlando (Friday 3/23, 6pm). Contact me by private message if you'd like to host an Instructables Show & Tell in your area, and we'll add it to the list. Locations and times will be posted at the bottom of the page. We'll be doing this again, so plan ahead.The TheoryHow to Host an Instructables Show and TellBring your friends & family, drinks or a snack for the table, and something you've made (or are thinking about or working on) to share with the group. You'll meet a diverse group of smart, excited art and technology geeks who want to talk to you about your projects and ideas. Please RSVP so we'll have a decent guess how many people to expect.Examples: your new LED, LEGO, or K'nex project, a cool screen-printed T-shirt, neat origami, a cool bike mod, home-made kimchee, alternate uses for your ipod, a fire-breathing Godzilla, a neat example of vintage technology, or just a cool idea you'd like to explore with other like-minded people. Anything you'd put up as an Instructable is definitely fair game- bring it by and show it off. Email or message me if you've got specific questions.Note: NO PowerPoint. You've got 2-4 minutes to talk about your project; words and models are best way to do a quick demo.SCHEDULE:7pm Doors open for mingling and snacks. If you've got something to talk about, put your name on the whiteboard. If not, you'd best have brought extra snacks.~8-9:30 Show & Tell. We run through the list, giving everyone a couple of minutes to talk about their project/idea and answer a few questions. In-depth discussion is saved for later so everyone gets a chance to demo their project; there will be a gong.~9:30-10:30 Check out what you liked, ask the questions we didn't get to during Show & Tell, talk to the cute nerd you've been eyeing across the room, and help clean out the rest of the snacks.Now you can join your geographic group!LOCATIONS: Bay Area Instructables, Friday 9 March, 7pm2175 Monarch St, Alameda, CA directionsRSVP: canida(*at*) instructables.com Boston Area MITERS, Saturday 10 March, 7pm265 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA directionsMost of the Instructables & Squid Labs founders built things at MITERS when they were in school; it's a neat clubhouse full of people who love to make fun things. They've got an Instructables group to show some of them off. NOTE: Please don't bring beer or wine as this event is on the MIT campus. Austin dorkbot Saturday, 10 March, 6-8pmBrush Square Park at 5th and Neches map(electronic art) Come to a special dorkbot during the SXSW Interactive Festival! We'll have a carnival style presentation of mad science fun spread across stations around the tent. Between scheduled presentations, show off your own project and get 30 seconds on the mike to tell the crowd about your demented electronic pursuits before being unceremoniously buzzed off the stage by 20,000 volts of raw power! Enormously raw POWER! Brush Square Park is adjacent to the Austin Convention Center, host of SXSW.Mandatory RSVP here or email rsvp@dorkbotaustin.org New York Etsy Labs Thursday, 22 March, 7pm325 Gold St., 6th Floor, Brooklyn, NY mapHosted by Etsy, MAKE, PopSci, & Create Digital Music Atlanta Taco Mac Perimeter Friday, 30 March 8pm1211 Ashford Crossing, Atlanta, GA mapRSVP: PM irollmyown or email jenny (*at*) hackaddict.net Orlando Panera Friday, 23 March 6pm11472 University Blvd., Orlando, FL mapRSVP: PM trebuchet03 or or send him email @gmail.com Savannah Thursday, 22 March, 6:30pmCafe at Books-A-Million, 8108 Abercorn St., Savannah, GA mapRSVP: PM royalestelYour City Here?Volunteer to host now! Libraries, schools, and other community venues will often let you reserve space. Just send me a personal message or an email and we'll coordinate.

Posted by canida 11 years ago


Is working with your hands better than just with your head?

I saw this on the BBC, and was so impressed I've reproduced the whole thing here: By Tom de Castella Journalist If the new year and inevitable return to work leaves you yearning for change, is working with your hands the answer? The time for reflection is nigh - a new year, a new you. But is that workstation you've slotted back into looking depressingly familiar? As millions of workers drag themselves back into the office to contemplate another 12 months of drudgery, many will be wondering if they are in the right job. Writer and mechanic Matthew Crawford thinks a lot of us would be better off trading in our mouse for a screwdriver. His recent book, The Case for Working With Your Hands, has been a huge hit in his native United States, praised by critics and politicians alike. Mr Crawford, who used to run a Washington think tank but now mends motorbikes, says it is no wonder people are miserable at work. Jobs have become so specialised and process driven that it is hard to see what difference you are making. And in those rare cases where one's impact is obvious, the result may seem pointless. Jealousy "A lot of us are plagued with a sense of uselessness," he says. "I've created a brand - what good is that? So I've persuaded people to buy something they didn't need." When running a think tank, he says he honestly could not see the rationale for being paid at all, and wondered what tangible goods or services he was providing to anyone. Then he opened a motorbike repair shop and was surprised to find he was not just happier, but more intellectually stimulated. The life of a tradesman is a varied existence, mixing practicality with logic and problem solving, he says. "Imagine you're an electrician, you're installing a conduit pipe and have to bend around the corners to make everything line up. It's the kind of work that requires improvisation and adaptation. It can never be reduced to following set procedures." Not only that, the earning potential for a tradesman is greater than in many office jobs. For instance, a skilled mechanic is likely to earn more than a sociology graduate working in publishing, he argues. Not everything about manual work is rosy. He warns that furniture making is not a good career move - Ikea can undercut you by employing workers in China for a fraction of the price. But a range of trades that need to be done on site cannot be outsourced to low wage economies. After new year introspection, January and February are traditionally one of the busiest periods for moving jobs. Mr Crawford believes doing a trade can make you happier. 'Middle-class paradox' "It offers small moments of confirmation, like when the bike you're mending starts up and runs. Small satisfactions like that can be elusive at a huge organisation with vast layers of management, where the criteria by which you're measured are ambiguous." The Times columnist Giles Coren recently tried working with his hands for the BBC Two show Giles and Sue Live the Good Life. Despite his on-screen schtick of appearing to hate everything the duo are asked to do, he fell in love with it. "I found chasing the chickens and weeding the allotment immensely satisfying," he says. "The pain... was making the television show." He agrees with Mr Crawford that modern life has been blighted by a series of alienating processes, often carried out on mobile phone, laptop and e-mail. In this way, his chosen career - journalism - has been stripped of its sense of adventure and human contact. "Even 15 years ago when I started as a reporter, you left the office to do a story. You went to investigate, visited people and used the cuttings library. Now I just sit... and Google. It's terrible, I wish I was a fireman." Despite his columnist's salary, he is jealous of those whose jobs have a clear purpose like the gardener and cleaner. "My gardener Brian comes in to do the garden every two weeks. He takes his shirt off in the summer and smokes a rollie. I can see him through the window, but I'm sitting indoors, staring at the screen to pay for this guy - it's the classic middle-class paradox." Rory Sutherland, vice-chairman of advertising firm Ogilvy UK, agrees that working with your hands does offer greater satisfaction in the short term. But manual workers lack something many of us crave - influence. Jobs like advertising where you "work with your head" may seem futile, but the ideas they come up with really do change the world, he says. "Five years ago someone worked out that you could have one size lid for the three different sizes of coffee cup that cafes have. Ok, it's emphatically not the cure for cancer, but it's through millions of little ideas like this that we get richer as a society." Perception of value Television dramas like Mad Men depict the office to be a place of invigorating competition, sexual tension and creativity. However stylised the portrayal, Mr Sutherland says there is a definite buzz to working around like-minded people - one that tradesmen miss out on. "People partly enjoy work because it's social, but working with your hands can be lonely." And he believes that experienced trades people are often economically undervalued due to the perverse way that consumers ascribe worth. He cites the behavioural economist Dan Ariely's story about a locksmith. As a young apprentice, the tradesman used to take half an hour to mend a lock, at which point he'd be thanked wholeheartedly and given a tip. When he became more experienced, the locksmith could fix a similar problem in a minute. He charged the same rate and completed the job much faster. But instead of being pleased at his speed, customers complained about his rates and refused to tip him. "It's about our perception of value." And in this respect the skilled tradesman will often struggle, he says. In the course of researching his book The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work, Alain de Botton concludes that we all want to make a difference in our job, however banal that change may be. "At the end of the working day we want to feel we've left the planet slightly healthier, tidier, saner than it was at the beginning," he says. "I'm not necessarily talking of huge changes - the difference might merely involve sanding a stair banister, removing the squeak on a door or reuniting someone with their lost luggage." And yet, it is a mistake to romanticise working with your hands, he warns. "At heart, what you're talking about is the charm of craft work. And it's my sense this can happen in places far removed from the workshop. If you're writing computer code you are in a sense displaying many of the same skills as a craftsperson, even if the finished product can't be held or touched." But following the financial crisis, Mr de Botton says attitudes to all types of work may be changing. He detects a move away from the middle-class idea that work lies "at the heart of our self-fulfillment", to the working-class view of employment as a means of feeding yourself and your family. So maybe job satisfaction is slipping down the list of what is important when it comes to work.

Posted by Kiteman 7 years ago


TEDxBaghdad - Iraq - violence, dust storms and open sourced manufacturing

Baghdad Iraq. It was once the jewel of the Muslim empire and epicenter of knowledge in the Eastern world. Now it is best known for corrupt governance, bombings, and dust storms. It was also my parents’ home. After visiting once in 1991 as a child the few memories I have of Iraq seemed to be shouting matches as my parents yelled over the phone making overseas calls. Names of Uncles I had never met were mentioned and a phone was handed to me and I was left to nervously fend for myself with my weak Iraqi slang and an Uncle who apparently knew all about me while I knew nothing of him. The country was an impenetrable black box to me that would spit out another refugee somewhere in the world every few years or so. Sixteen years later the first wall between Iraq and me was broken. In 2007 my nuclear family had traveled to Syria and for the first time I met family members who still lived in Baghdad. I knew them now. My uncles and cousins grew flesh and blood. I could feel their prickly faces as we greeted with the traditional Iraqi 4 sided cheek kiss. They could graciously give me their dishdashas as gifts. Names finally had faces, but those faces were deep, sunken and afraid. 2007 was a bad year of sectarian war in Iraq, which is why the Damascas district of Harasta was flooded with Iraqis. The sound of construction continued through the night to keep up with the massive (ab)use of the "tourist" visas. I saw something in the Iraqis in Syria that I hadn't seen before; something that scared me. I saw hopelessness. It was then I settled on a long-term project to return to the country and share something that I had just discovered around the same time: the future doesn’t come prepared -- we make the future. The do-it-yourself attitude that was growing in America was being combined with the culture of sharing that you find in hackerspaces, at instructables.com and in open source technology. This atmosphere made anything possible. You want to build a vertical generator without any spinning parts? Sure! How about a walking quadraped robot with a sofa? Do you want to quit your job, write zines and sell them in the crafting circle? Sure! Start a business! Write a novel! Organize a benefit concert! Sure - sure - sure! “Make your own future” was the message. It was a message of hope - it was the message that I wanted to share in the Middle East, and especially in Iraq. In 2011 the opportunity to work on sharing this beautiful message in the Middle East presented itself to me, so I quit my robotics job and took it (sorry Andrew). A few friends and I started a tiny organization called GEMSI - The Global Entrepreneurship and Maker Space Initiative. We funded ourselves through Kickstarter and our first project was a Three-Day Maker Space hosted at Makerfaire Africa. We were hoping to let people experience the feeling of the Maker Movement first-hand. We collaborated with Emeka and the team from MFA, Cairo Hackerspace, along with many amazing egyptians from all over the country. We had a successful first attempt at sharing the message of "Yes you can!” It was a great start, but Iraq was still an impenetrable fortress to me. It took till 2012 and a chance encounter with friends in Cambridge, MA for me to find my first avenue back into Iraq. Via my friends, I met someone who’s friend was affiliated with TEDxBaghdad. A few steps removed, sure, but when I heard about TEDxBaghdad I knew I had found my way in. I knew TEDx and the types of programs they hosted; I knew they were hopeful, inspired, and shared a vision for a brighter tomorrow. I started communicating with Emeka from MFA, who also works with TED, and he put me in touch with Yahay. After my first skype call with Yahay I knew I was going. Someone else had done it - someone broke that barrier, did amazing work in the country, and survived. It wasn't the death trap my family was telling me it was. There was a new narrative being woven and I knew what I needed to do. I booked my flights before I even finalized any workshops. I needed to meet the TEDxBaghdad team. Later, I called my parents and told them I was going to Baghdad and they said, "Shinu?! Inta Makhabal?!" That probably means exactly what you think it does. Needless to say, they had their concerns, but I was going regardless. Now that the tickets were bought, we started planning. Yahay put me in touch with Abdal Ghany, one of the Iraqi organizers living in Baghdad. He coordinated everything. It was amazing. These guys kick some serious planning butt! Ghany basically told me, “Show up and give your workshop. We'll take care of the rest.” This was a welcome change from the hours of facebooking, planning, and coordination I usually have to go through to schedule events. It really seemed like this was possible. I was going to give an Arduino and 3D printing workshop in Baghdad and I was really excited! I sent an email to Sparkfun and Makezine asking them for open source electronics donations since I knew bringing my electronics box through the airport wouldn't be a good idea. They sent me a nice goodie-bag of beautifully packaged Maker products. These two organizations have given me a tremendous amount of help throughout the years, for which I am extremely thankful. I packed a suitcase filled with 2 3D printers, 25 Arduinos, an assortment of other open source hardware and sensors and headed out looking a bit like a bomb development lab. Yeesh! Somehow I made it through China, Saudi, and Turkey without any serious interrogation. Mostly just really quizzical looks from my unzipped bag up back to me... "You're a teacher?" they ask. "Yes," I say, "yes I am." Turkey was the stop before Iraq. Turkey was brilliant, sunny, lush, and seemed to be comprised of mostly happy smiling people walking by the sea. Coming from the deserts of Mecca, this was a welcome sight. I let the green of Turkey wash away the dust of Saudi Arabia. The mishmash of cultures, sounds, foods, religions gave me a great feeling of liberation. This was a lively place and the two hackerspaces I met up with there, Base Istanbul and Istanbul Hackerspace were fantastic hosts. Furkan and I spent a lovely day together chatting about Maker culture as it spreads through the Middle East and then in the end we had a potluck BBQ with members from both hackerspaces by the rocks of the sea. It was great to see these two Turkish hackerspaces and to be reminded that this movement is truly global. My dream of hackerspaces empowering people globally is really possible – and it’s great to know that it is a dream that is shared by others. I left them full of enthusiasm and flew directly to Baghdad. Landing in Baghdad was strange and a bit concerning. Looking out of the window all I could see was a brown cloud. We were landing in a dust storm. I had heard about the turab (dust) of Iraq, but this was the first time I saw it in person, and it would be one of the things most often on my mind. Getting a visa for me was surprisingly easy, except for the fact I forgot my passport on the plane and two guards had to escort me one to each side back to the airplane to retrieve it. But once I had my passport, I told them my laqab, which is the full name that includes ancestry. Showed them a copy of my dad’s passport and my Iraqi birth certificate and I was in. I was hoping for a nice stamp, perhaps with some Iraqi relic on it. But they took my passport and wrote in it: "Originally Iraqi", so there it goes, it's official. Ahmed, my cousin, was not at the airport when I took my paper work and headed out to the lobby. The airport was sparsely populated and heavily regulated. I barely managed to snap a picture before a guard came up to me and had me delete them from my phone. In the lobby I met a man just released from a Swiss prison. The Swiss had given him the option to be sent back home to Iraq, or be jailed. He chose to leave and come back to Iraq. This becomes a theme later as I see more and more people, all of whom desire to leave the country to become refugees elsewhere. It seems that when hope runs out for the country you live in, the only option is to find a new one. This story is one of a million various stories of struggling to find a new life. Each varies in its details, but all have survival at their core. Ahmed arrives 30 minutes late, apologizing. He's wearing jeans and a polo. His hair seemed freshly cut and his face was serious. We had never met before. The only thing I knew of him was that he thought I was reckless for coming. He had been spending hours on Skype with me attempting to convince me that coming would be a bad idea: "You have no idea how bad the bugs are. Just wait till you see the dust storms. The heat will kill you... etc" But once I saw him in person it all changed. I didn't think I'd grow to like Ahmed, but I grew to appreciate his ways and he became like a brother to me before I left. He took me to Mansour, a neighborhood in Baghdad, telling me stories about Iraq as we travelled. This is the neighborhood where the house my dad designed and family built stands. On the ride home we had our car checked for bombs at least 4 times by what Iraqi's call Saytarat, which is the equivalent of a checkpoint and, to me, seemed a total nuciance. They were the reason he was late. What would normally be a 20 minute drive can become three hours long because every car is checked for bombs. They are everywhere; throughout the city, on every road. We passed the guard who watches over my family’s neighborhood, and he takes his hand off his machine gun to wave at Ahmed, and I begin to recognize that weapons, car inspections and burned out cars are normal here, so they don't think to comment on it - like an empty lot in Detroit, or the homeless in San Francisco. We got to my family home with no time to rest. I had to leave to meet up with Abdul Ghany and the crew at a Cafe in an hour and then conduct the workshop in two. Ahmed comes with me - he doesn't trust people we'd never met before and won’t let me out of his sight. I trust first till proven otherwise, he has learned to do the opposite. It’s a telling sign of how different our lives are on a day-to-day basis. As soon as I met the TEDxBaghdad crew, I felt at ease. MNA, Abdul Ghany and the entire crew were thoughtful, hardworking, and inspiring people. I was really happy to have intersected with them and they helped me in more ways than I could count. We first met up at Everyday, a local Mansour café. Everyday cafe was hyper airconditioned and everyone seemed to think it was hotter than it was. The crew was awesome, they were really a great first introduction to the excited young people of Baghdad and they certainly have the famed Iraqi hospitality. But here's a tip: do not order a fajita in Baghdad ;D. Mohammed Al-Samarraie pulled out their iPads and started showing me video production work he was doing for TEDx. Abdul Ghany comes a little late and we have head out to the workshop. The workshop was held in a two story office building surrounded by palm trees. Looking out the the tinted back window we could see the muddy river run past, winding and dark. Slowly the TEDx people started trickling in. Then I started to get nervous. The checkpoints didn't bother me, the tanks in the streets were not an issue, but here were these people coming to learn something from me. What could I share that would really matter to them when they had so much to deal with daily? What could I share that could be relevant to people who see bombings as I experience lightning storms? I have been to other places in the world to share this kind of information, and some of those places have had political problems and ongoing revolutions. But Iraq was the first country I had been to that really seemed like a war zone. I decided that first I needed to learn from them! What were their projects? What did they hope for? I hoped they would learn from each other and get excited about their projects and I wanted to be able to share things that were relevant to them. Thus, everyone was encouraged to talk about who they are, how they learned about TEDxBaghdad and to share their project, share with us their mission, or share an inspiring story. I was amazed to hear about all the incredible initiatives the crew was doing. From intercultural exchange programs, to street clean ups, to historical artifact preservation, each of them shared and I started realizing something. They were not as interested in new technology as they were interested in arts and culture and after hearing about a few of their projects I started realizing why. Learning about culture and paying attention to the arts gives people the ability to pay attention to details. They can look at another human being and see all the subtleties that make us who we are. We each fall in love, we struggle, we question, and have doubts. Arts give depth to a black and white world. Sectarianism is difficult when we pay attention to the commonalities that tie us all together. What would the world be like if anyone who wanted a weapons license was required to have visited India, could pass an art history exam and could play stairway to heaven on the guitar? We were in a sort of office building near the river which ran by dark and muddy looking through the tinted windows. One by one, they stood up in front and gave their short presentations. There were doctors, engineers, and designers in the crew. They each stood up and told the story of how they found out about TEDxBaghdad and it was incredible. Each of them had a friend recommend it to them, and it was mostly done through Facebook. Some people's projects were related to health, culture, antiquity preservation, and connecting Iraqis with the rest of the world. While they spoke I made a graph of the things that connected all of their ideas together. It was a beautiful thing to see. The common themes were to help Iraq as a country through the integration of new ideas and how to bring a new face of Iraq and present it to the world. To have the news about Iraq be about amazing things, inspiring things, rather than explosions. Being in that room with that energy made me feel like we were already on our way. I pulled out the boxes of donations given to us by Sparkfun and The Make Shed and now it was my turn. I told them about my story coming into contact with my friend Alex through instructables.com, how being in San Francisco and Cambridge opened my eyes to a new way of entrepreneurship using communities and open source technology. And how they could make anything they could imagine if they got together to do it. We discussed how sharing and collaboration was a common value that held the entire system together. I used the concept of the LED throwie, which is a simple idea by Graffiti Research Labs to connect an LED to a coin battery and a magnet. They used it to throw at ferrous buildings as a form of electronic graffiti but once they uploaded it to instructables the idea was out there and people were inspired to take it and derive many other projects. You can never know what will happen when you share something or when you create a tool and share it. People created outlined throwies, LED floaties in balloons and finally we start seeing LED floaties which are sequenced to act like a light show at a phish concert. Hahaha! We then talked about the Arduino an easy to use microcontroller designed for artists. It's a bit of technology that is a simple and easy to use platform to build interactive projects. We talked about how the open nature of the project people can use the Arduino and then use shields to add features like being able to connect to the internet or play MP3s. Open source tools make building new products a lot like using legos. We were in the middle of using some of the sensors The Maker Shed had sent us to make a DIY heart rate monitor when the power went out and all went dark except for the LED throwies we had made. It suddenly felt very intimate. We put all the LED throwies in the center of the room and huddled around it for story time. The feeling of connection was palpable for me. Sure the lack of power meant that we were not going to be able to 3D print, but being in the dark with TEDxBaghdad was one of my favorite memories of this trip. The lights went on and we had a long question and answer session / photo shoot. Some of the doctors were interested to use the Arduino based heart rate monitors to replace the broken ones in the hospital. I heard about this and was flabbergast that the most basic and cheap tools I had brought with me might have a direct impact and may even save lives. Technology might not solve the political problems of the country but it seems that there was a lot of room for development and that the crew I was with was creative and excited to make use of it. I passed out 20 Arduino kits that day, including the Lillypad which is a version of the Arduino intended to be sewn into clothing. Although there were very few engineers in the audience, everyone seemed to be buzzing with ideas and ways to use the Arduinos. What a great workshop! I was super excited because not only had they understood the message, they seem to have been infected with the feeling of capability! Now to seal the deal, we were all going to go out and eat a classic Iraqi dish Simach Masguf. Ahmed has been calling me hourly making sure that I was OK, but I felt safe enough with my new friends so we all headed out to a fish spot by the river. Hours go by, lots of fish is eaten, and lots of juice is drunk. Some of the crew smoke some sheesha. It was like I was with new old friends. My Iraqi slang was improving hourly and although we had just met I knew me and TEDxBaghdad we're going to be working together again very soon. I would have stayed all night eating and chatting about future projects and the problems to solve in Iraq, but the cerfew was about to set in and we had to jet. Yeah, there is still a curfew. On the ride home my head is filled with contradictions. Hope and confusion mix in my head as my family rings 4 more times. I get home safe and decide that the only way to deal with the complicated situation in Iraq was to act with irrational hope and optimism. That's the way TEDxBaghdad seemed to work. And that's going to be mine as well. The next day there were five explosions in Baghdad so TEDxBaghdad and I decided against going out to the Iraqi National Museum even though we had to request permission to go. We meet instead back at Everyday and there we solidify our commitment to working for a more beautiful Baghdad and a country which will become a producing nation once again. Sharing with the world it's art, science and literature like it once did years ago. +BG

Posted by lamedust 6 years ago