how to build a mount to hold a a roller wringer for drying clothes?

I recently purchased a roller wringer, but having trouble finding a place to secure it to which will remain stable while i crank. The oval washtub i have id small around 30quarts, it fits , i use a piece of wood so the clamps aren't  on the washtub.. however the tub id too light weight and falls over if there is no water or clothe in the tub.i will truy and edit this later with a picture and measurements, but off hand i think between the screw clamps it is 14 inches,  i would really like ti mount in on my bathtub, outer rim which is 6inches.,since i would  have no stability and movements.he vendor i bought ot from said it was normality monuted on a upside down T shaped wood setup, i am not sure what that means. i also  don't want to get a bigger wash basin, since i l live in an apartment and space is really limited/ these are the specs from amazon " Clamps open to 1 3/4". The wringer's metal frame size is 15.5" wide. With the crank handle attached it extends the length to 29". The frame height is 8.5" but extends to 10.25" counting the tension screw knob on top. The metal frame is 2" deep with a 6" drip tray the slides into the frame under the rollers. The usable inside width is 11.25" from one side of the roller to the other. Weighs about 15 lbs assembled."

Question by escapefromyonkers 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Can you make a clothes wringer?

I would love to have a wringer for use when dying fabrics, but just can't afford to buy a new one. The antique wringers often have damaged rollers, but they can cost as much or more than a new one.

Question by dulciquilt 10 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


An idea for an alternative cloth wringer

I'm thinking about a new design for a cloth wringer like function. A product that will squeeze your cloth from water. Not pointing out any imperfections from a generic cloth wringer shown in the first picture but its just a thought of designing a new one since some say that the current mechanism of a cloth wringer doesn't do the job effectively or there is a separate need for a bucket for it to be attached. Anyway, the design I'm thinking of is to solve any problems that is experienced by a normal cloth wringer.I'm thinking of a new design that would include a tube that would let you insert your desired cloth and a separate cloth absorber that would absorb the water when you squeeze the tube. A picture of a tube would look like the second picture (taken from the internet, youtube aa product called "Easy Squeezy" by Vitility). However its mechanism isn't the same as the idea I have but its physical appearance is kind of the same. I can't make a new one since I still don't know how it would look like based on the mechanism I have in mind.The Easy Squeezer's mechanism includes two separate tubes and you'll need to insert your cloth inside the inner tube and close it by another tube. Then you'll need to apply a force directly into the tube so you'll be able to squeeze out the water from your cloth. As shown from the youtube demonstration video (Link:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--tHZRMjk3Q)Thus, an idea came up and the mechanism I have in mind is you'll need the tubes just like from the "Easy Squeezer" and a separate absorbing cloth (preferrably a microfiber one). Then, you'll need to roll your wet cloth along with the microfiber cloth and insert it into the tube. After you've inserted the two rolled clothes into the tubes the mechanism would allow you to create a twisting force into the tubes and ultimately squeeze most of the water from the wet cloth while preserving an uncreased cloth. Which is illustrated from the fourtth picture. Generally, you can do the twisting yourself even without the tubes but it would take a great effort to squeeze and make it a tedious job when you're going to do it for a large amount of wet clothes. The mechanism I have in mind is for the tubes' ability to translate a larger torque (or twisting moment) into the tubes while only having to exert little force. However, the problem is I don't know how to start in the design. Any ideas and suggestions on how to improve?

Question by CzarLuc123145 6 weeks ago  |  last reply 6 weeks ago


How to repair (rehydrate) wooden wringer section..........its cracked in places? Answered

Found the top section of a wringer washer made mostly of wood.  The rollers has some cracks in it and would like to know if it can be repaired (rehydrated) to use again on clothes (fabrics)?

Question by Snooze2978 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


how to make a sorghum/ sugar cane mill?

I have been looking at growing sorghum and processing to make my own syrup.. i need to extract the jiuce and all extractors look like an old clothes wringer.. does any one have any idea how to make a sorghum/ sugar cane mill? i found a hand powered one, but this should be a fairly decent project for a home project

Question by kdallmer 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Memories.....like the corners of our minds......

Some fond memories: How many do you remember ?Head lights dimmer switches on the floor.Ignition switches on the dashboard.Heaters mounted on the inside of the fire wall.Real ice boxes.Pant leg clips for bicycles without chain guards.Soldering irons you heat on a gas burner or an open hearth.Using hand signals for cars without turn signals.Older Than Dirt Quiz:Count all the ones that you remember, NOT the ones you were told about! Your ratings at the bottom. 1. Blackjack chewing gum 2. Wax Coke-shaped bottles with colored sugar water 3. Candy cigarettes 4. Soda pop machines that dispensed glass bottles 5. Coffee shops or diners with tableside juke boxes 6. Home milk delivery in glass bottles with cardboard stoppers 7. Party lines 8. Newsreels before the movie 9. P.F. Flyers10. Butch wax11. Telephone numbers with a word prefix (OLive-6933)12. Peashooters13. Howdy Doody14. 45 RPM records15. S&H; Green Stamps16. Hi-fi's17. Metal ice trays with lever18. Mimeograph paper19. Blue flashbulb20. Packards21. Roller skate keys22. Cork popguns23. Drive-ins24. Studebakers25. Wash tub wringersIf you remembered 0-5 = You're still youngIf you remembered 6-10 = You are getting olderIf you remembered 11-15 = Don't tell your age,If you remembered 16-25 = You're older than dirt ! (PS: This is me :-) )I might be older than dirt but those memories are the best part of my life.'Senility Prayer'...God grant me...The senility to forget the people I never liked;The good fortune to run into the ones that I do,And the eyesight to tell the difference.''Hey Dad,' one of my kids asked the other day, 'What was your favorite fast food when you were growing up ? ' 'We didn't have fast food when I was growing up,' I informed him. 'All the food was slow.''C'mon, seriously. Where did you eat ?''It was a place called 'at home, I explained. 'Grandma cooked every day and when Grandpa got home from work, we sat down together at the dining room table, and if I didn't like what she put on my plate I was allowed to sit there until I did like it.'By this time, the kid was laughing so hard I was afraid he was going to suffer serious internal damage, so I didn't tell him the part about how I had to have permission to leave the table. But here are some other things I would have told him about my childhood if I figured his system could have handled it:Some parents NEVER owned their own house (my Dad did, it cost him $14,000 for a 3 bedroom rancher), wore Levis , set foot on a golf course, traveled out of the country or had a credit card. In their later years they had something called a revolving charge card. The card was good only at Sears Roebuck. Or maybe it was Sears AND Roebuck. Either way, there is no Roebuck anymore. Maybe he died.My parents never drove me to soccer practice. I had a bicycle that weighed probably 50 pounds, and only had one speed, (slow). We didn't have a television in our house until I was 8. It was, of course, black and white, but they bought a piece of colored plastic to cover the screen. The top third was blue, like the sky, and the bottom third was green, like grass. The middle third was red. It was perfect for programs that had scenes of fire trucks riding across someone's lawn on a sunny day. Some people had a lens taped to the front of the TV to make the picture look larger. I was 14 before I tasted my first pizza, it was called 'pizza pie.' When I bit into it, I burned the roof of my mouth and the cheese slid off, swung down, plastered itself against my chin and burned that, too. It's still the best pizza I ever had.We didn't have a car until I was 9. Before that, the only car in our family was my grandfather's Ford. He called it a 'machine.' It started by pushing a button on the dashboard. I never had a telephone in my room. The only phone in the house was in the living room and it was on a party line. Before you could dial, you had to listen and make sure some people you didn't know weren't already using the line.Pizzas were not delivered to our home. But milk was.All newspapers were delivered by boys and all boys delivered newspapers. I delivered a newspaper, six days a week. It cost 7 cents a paper, of which I got to keep 2 cents. I had to get up at 4 AM every morning.. On Saturday, I had to collect the 42 cents from my customers. My favorite customers were the ones who gave me 50 cents and told me to keep the change. My least favorite customers were the ones who seemed to never be home on collection day.Movie stars kissed with their mouths shut. At least, they did in the movies. Touching someone else's tongue with yours was called French kissing and they didn't do that in movies. I don't know what they did in French movies. French movies were dirty and we weren't allowed to see them.Growing up isn't what it used to be, is it ?MEMORIES from a friend:My Dad is cleaning out my grandmother's house (she died in December) and he brought me an old Royal Crown Cola bottle. In the bottle top was a stopper with a bunch of holes in it. I knew immediately what it was, but my daughter had no idea. She thought they had tried to make it a salt shaker or something. I knew it as the bottle that sat on the end of the ironing board to 'sprinkle' clothes with because we didn't have steam irons. Man, I am old.

Topic by Goodhart 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago