How can I get baked on, brown stain off from a smooth "stainless" steel cooktop surface?

Stainless steel cooktop. I've tried vinegar, soap and water, and even a cleaning cream called "Cook Top".

Asked by 9 years ago


My GE Profile cooktop surface burner control won't turn. I can push it down but won't trun..what can I do?

The model # is JGP979.  I can't get it to turn to ignite the burner

Asked by elainedc 6 years ago


GE cooktop

The knob won't turn on my cooktop range.  3 others work.  Is there anything that I can do to free this up?

Posted by EDC1943 6 years ago


Heating Ceramics?

Is it safe to heat ceramic bowls and cups and stuff on a hotplate or cooktop? Like plain white ceramic stuff. BTW: The piece in question is almost certainly stoneware, not porcelain or earthenware.

Asked by LiquidLightning 7 years ago


Induction heating formula

Hello,I have a project on induction heating (cooktops) and I am struggling to find a formula that combines the power consumption, the temperature difference of the heated material and the time. Anyone please?

Asked by harris_tsil 6 years ago


corner cook top. Any information and pictures of cook tops in the corner? Thanks, Pat

Corner cooktops. We are building a house and would like to put in a corner cook top. I know that they take up more room, I would love to see some pictures. Any information would be great. Thanks, Pat

Asked by paddycake 9 years ago



Induction heater 2.0

Some might have already tried my first induction heater, which was more a proof of concept than a modern device. Although I like to keep things simple where possible I want to upgrade my heater to a fully electronic version running on mains power. This time the base concept is to use a cheap induction cooktop for the control and power source. After using a few already as a communication device I realised it is a costly way of producing smoke signs but I am getting on the right track with the design now. So my obvious questions are: 1. Did actually anyone ever built my current induction heater and if so, can you provide some nice pics? 2. If you were interested in a hobby induction heater, what would like to do with it?     E.g: Just for curiosity on how it works, heat treatment of punches, chisels and similar,     heat treating knifes or even swords, sheet metal work.... 3. What would like to have included?     E.g: Water cooling for continous use, air cooling (mostly for smaller and quick jobs), exchangable coils,     additional micro controller for temp, water and remote control (foot panel or similar)... 4. Do you require a fully shielded version to avoid interference? 5. If you are based in AU (preferable VIC): Would you be able to donate me faulty (partially or fully) or working induction cooktops,     for example discarded units with broken glass tops?     Would you able to donate me copper tubing OD8mm or less? Leftovers from pluming installations, old LPS systems or similar?     Prefered lenght 1m or longer as the coils need quite a few turns... :(     Each donor will of course be listed in the Instructable unless you prefer to remain unnamed. Let me know what you think because this time I am not just building for myself, this time it is for you!

Posted by Downunder35m 2 years ago



Electronic repair after a voltage spike or power surge

So far I was lucky and never got a lightning strike or other power failure to induce high voltages into my house and equippment. But over the time I got several requests from friends to take a look at things after literally all connected electronics in their house got fried. In some cases there is only a total write off as due to a lack of surge protectors inside all unwanted juice made it's way into vital components. Like a brand new Samsung TV where the replacement of the power board was the only option - which makes you wonder... But in other cases, like microwaves, induction cooktops, computers and such I had some good success with the repairs. Guess it comes down to purs luck on both sides, power surge was not too bad and simple components on the input side failed quickly enough to prevent damage to microprocessors or other sensitive parts. Right now I have an induction cooktop here again that failed after a mains transformer in street blew up during a thunderstorm. I can tell it was bad as everything in the area of fried parts has a vaporizsed metal film on the surface and not much is left that was a surge protection. I cleaned all up, replaced the varistors and missing parts of the traces on the circuit board but the cooktop is not performing the way it should anymore :( At some stage during cooking it turns off with a meaningless error code stating the input voltage was out of bounds. So my next attempt was to literally remove every single component from the filter and power supply board to measure for any possible connections between the traces. By doing so I noticed several points where I had a quite high but measurable resistance in areas where there should be none. Mostly on the direct input side where the varistors tried to save things. So I used my Dremel in a tin drill press to cut the circuit board aourd the affect areas (where possible with a drill, otherwise with a thin grinding disk).. Sure enough I was greeted by charcoal colored dust in several areas. After removing all material until the dust was "clean"  tried again and this time all seems to work fine. I would like to use this topic to offer some help and guidance in case you have devices that suffered a severe power surge of some sort. Many of us either have no insurance to replace those items or even if you do the device might be expensive enough to try a repair despite getting it replaced. Trust me, even it went up in smoke there is still a chance to fix it in some cases and if proper protective circuits were in place the repair could as cheap as a few Dollars for replacement parts. To get useful advice the following things should be included in your request: Some clear pictures showing a close up of the affected parts - if there is visibale damage to be seen. A brief description of what happened, e.g.: lightning strike directly into the house or outside power lines, generator or inverter failure or simply that the power company stuffed up and your entire street was affected. Of course you will need the means to take the device apart for investigation and also some basic soldering skills or somehow how has and can assist you. But if you are up to the challange I am willing to help if possible.

Posted by Downunder35m 1 year ago


How do I publish an Instructable and can make sure my work is not stolen for commercial products? Answered

Background: A nice member noticed an induction heater "kit" on Ebay and commented about it. After a lot of digging I found some pictures and technical details on the web - Google translate might be funny at times but was a real help for my bad chinese skills... Turned out the shematics for this heater are identical to my design. Sure they use a different mosfets and and create a nice looking circuit board for all but it does not change the fact that my design drives it. One chinese wholeseller is selling them in 500pcs bulk. Current problem: I am working on the next generation of my induction heater based on an induction cooktop. Since the power levels are much higher and more option possible I think it will be a great project loved by a lot of people. But I feel reluctant to publish it in a detailed form that can be used by everyone to re-create it as I fear it will end up on Ebay as well. So far I can't even estimate how much profit some chinese guy is making while laughing at me and for obvious reasons I would like to prevent that from happening to 2.0 as well... Is there any way to protect my designs or to get hands on the chinaman to strangle some money back out of him?

Asked by Downunder35m 1 year ago


30 minute DIY AM particle-acceleration

Last fall, I verified an initial relationship of resonance between two bifilar wound wires (of any length). The predictable sequence resonates at the following levels - 20 Hz, 30 Hz, 50 Hz (and all multiples of these 3 frequencies). I used a Parallax Propeller Board - with PGEN 2.0 software from Innovationshop in Germany.   This software allows for a waveform built of 32 stacked frequencies to be created and amplified.   I have used it to successfully break the bonds of distilled water - as one of my earlier videos shows 2 years ago. JL Naudin calls it a "GEGENE machine" - but it is a simple, tabletop, particle accelerator.  His results can be found here:::  http://jnaudin.free.fr/wfcbooster/indexen.htm One of my earlier videos from May 2013 - can be found at YouTube - I just want to show people how this works.  It is a 4 minute explanation of open-sourced Patent 512,340.:::   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHxK1VWrXcM The materials:: 1 - 1800 watt induction cooktop (iron, copper, or 3-ply stainless cookware is required on these types of devices) 2.  50 feet of 14 AWG speaker wire 3.  2-10 count of 500-watt halogen lightbulbs. 4.  wire, solder & connectors for the wire-ends. 5.  1 stainless-steel HHO DC electrolyzer tank.  6.  Cooking Pan - or light fixture (to hold light bulbs). 7.  High Voltage diodes (500 Volts or higher)

Posted by jabel4 3 years ago


Tesla coil anyone with new design ideas?

I am in the early stages of building a new Tesla coil. After over 10 years without one I think it is time to add one to my collection again ;) As always I want to stick to to the classic design, meaning except for the HV supply all will be home made, including the capacitor. No no fancy electronics, just high voltage, a cap and a spark gap... However, classic must not always mean there is no room for improvement. Of course you can measure or calculate the frequencies for your primary and secondary coil before even starting to power it up - but where is the fun in that?? My last Tesla coil was driven by a 2KW transformer delivering 25.000 Volts. This time I go smaller for indoor use and will aim for a simple neon sign transformer with around 3000 volts and 20-30mA output. Reason for this that I plan to make an Instructable out of it if I find the time and would prefer to use power supplies that can be obtained in most countries without totally blowing the budget. I did some research on the net to see if there are any significant developments but the only things I could find are in relation to the spark gap or to use a conical primary coil. For the conical coil I could not even find any comparison to standard flat coil in the same system or a decent explanation why it is claimed to be so much better. My aim is to go a different way for the primary completely. Instead of using copper pipe in a standard winding pattern I want to try a quadfilar coil instead. My early tests on a small scale confirmed that a bifilar coil is better than a standard coil. For some weird reson the magnetic field reaches further and is stronger while at the same time there is less loss. So far bilifar coils are only used on some charging pads and "wireless power supplies" for TV sets. In most induction cooktops, where the benefits would be extra obvious, they are not used due to the higher cost factor of producing them. Big question here is: Has anyone experimented with bifilar or quadfilar coils in high voltage applications and is willing share some insight?

Asked by Downunder35m 1 year ago


looking around for tutorials

I am suggesting tutorials on the following. All passive components and prefereably vacuum tubes can be used to build the following circuits.   Analog computers that are programmable and hopefully intellegent. with these you should process many signals at the same time. and instead of displaying results on an oscillscope, make a monitor and a gui.   I have a theory for a power supply. I think it works im not technically able to build the entire circuit yet. It's all passive. its a passive AM radio that sends a 60 hz sine wave. then on the other end you have many many antennas attatched to a passive receiver circuit. because each antenna will induce an electric field from the air, you should be able to get lots more power out of the circuit than you put in. and because its antennas, its compact and light weight.   And if you can figure it out, you can build plasma rockets too. I need some more information on how plasmas travel through an electric field.   but you know if you want to, you can build cars, boats planes, houses, cookware, sensors, surveilance, recording studios, 3d printers etcetera in passive electronics and post tutorials on it.   I am getting somewhat close to growing carbon based electronic components on a tree. I have some(a few) molecules in mind and I am starting to research and make progress on sequencing DNA.   If you want this information it is simply yours. but I need analog flight simulators, spaceflight simulators, weather simulators that use chemistry and math to predict the weather, ocean simulators that simulate all of the bathymetry of the ocean to predict surf and erosion.   aircraft designers. I have a motor that i am designing like the following. It only uses permanent magnets at the moment and it works similar to an alternator. If you can figure it out, you can build it too.   I have an alternate way to make bearings by using cylindrical magnets(the kind with the hole in the middle) and one is attracting and one is repelling. this should be able to make it so that the magnets levitate and spin freely.   Again if you want this information it is yours. YOu can also make analog computers compatable with software that exists today like linux. it is possible. it just takes some time and some thought.   ANyhow anything you want make it wireless make it programmable and make it and post tutorials on it.   I want EVERYTHING to be wireless from the computers to the recording studios to the rockets.   ANyhow thanks and have fun and stuff and it might be fun and it would help everyone and would help your compnay to produce these tutorial but you know wireless guitars, wireless amps, wireless record players wireless cnc machines, wireless laser cutters wireless induction cooktops etcetera. you can even make a record player that instead of using that metal thing to vibrate, you can use like sonar. You know this is just some cool stuff to consider developing. The radio based power supply will work, it just needs some fine tuning and same with the motor, but yeah have fun and be easy with this stuff itll take a while. but you know if you build rockets, spin the rockets to create a strong electric field, but you know i could use tutorials on how plasmas move and accellerate through an electric field etcetera. and for god sake, build EVERYTHING!  

Posted by tyandisi 2 years ago


The more natural way of cleaning things...

At my workplace we basically have a specific cleaner or cleaning product for every task you can think of. From glass over stainless to plastics and desinfectants for lots of different surfaces. After a quick look into my cleaining cabinet at home I started to wonder if I am doing something wrong as I only have a few cleaning things for my use. Asking my friends also showed they have a big bunch of cleaning chemicals, plus the bottle of bleach that everyone down here has. So I though: Your grandma only had a few cleaning products and you learned most of things you need to clean from her. Considering I grew up healthy I guess she must have done something right.... Let's clean up with the cleaning myths, shall we? 1. What cleaning chemicals do you have? For quite a few people the list would start something like this: Dishwashing liquid, window, cleaner, bathroom cleaner, soap scum remover, floor cleaner, oven cleaner, several desinfectants.... If that is true for you too than we might be on to something already. 2. What cleaning chemicals do I really need? This is a good question as everyone is a bit different but I assume a healthy household here. Of course we need certain things to clean our various surfaces properly but it is far less than waht you have been told by the TV commercials.... These days we like to think if there is a special cleaner for something then of course we have to use it to clean properly. Unless you have trades people walking through with their wet dogs several times a day and see dust storms at least twice a week you really only need a few things. So let's get to the basics: 3. Old style cleaning and what you need for it - really the only stuff required to keep all clean and sanitised. a) Methylated spirit b) Clear ammonia - cloudy ammonia works too but be aware that the added soap can be a problem that leaves streakes c) Hydrogen peroxide - pool grade to be cheap in the long run d) Orange oil - citrus oil works great too if you prefer a different smell e) Soap - just basic soap, these stinky, slightly yellow and hard bricks - no fancy smelly soap ;) f) Several cleaning brushes but you should already have those g) Windows cleaning tools - the basic microfibre cloth and squeegee will do h) Several microfibre cloths - bigger ones for floors and walls, smaller for windows and the rest I) Yesterdays newspaper j) Baking soda With those few things we have everything to clean whatever comes up and if bought in bulk comes down to a few cents per bottle compared to a few dollars when you buy all the stuff you don't need. Lets figure out what the stuff does and how to use it: 4. Mixing and what to use it for.... The alcohol is a really good remover for everything greasy and also desinfects the surfaces. A quick spray and wipe on your bench is all that you need to remove oily residue or the mess from the kids. Mixed with a bit of soap and water (about 50-50) also removes sticky stuff like jam or syrup. If we use about 50ml of alcohol, 50ml of clear ammonia and 900ml of water we get one liter of really good window cleaner. The modern way is to use microfibre for the cleaning and a squeegee to get it dry, the old way just uses a cloth and then the window is "polished" with some old newspaper. The black ink reacts with the alcohol and form a mild abrasive while the paper soaks up the moisture, the result is a prefectly clean window in under 3 minutes. Orange oil is not only a powerful degreaser but also lifts old dirt or even glue residue. Used directly it will get rid of the remains from sticky tape, stickers and everything that other cleaners fails to get off - smoth surface and non soaking of course. 50ml of it with 50ml of ammonia and 100ml of alcohol per bucket makes a good florr cleaner and your house smells nice when done. Works best if you can use a microfibre cloth or floor wiper to dry the surface with it. In the kitchen we can find a lot of surfaces that are greasy and we already covered that bit, so lets get to the though stuff. The kitchen sink can become dull looking although it is not scratched. This is due to hard water, food residue, soap and other things. Best is of course to wipe it and dry it after use but who really does this every day? A pot scrubbing pad with some baking soda on it does the trick here. Make the pad nly moist and sprinkle the baking soda on it. Rub over the stainless and if too dry add a few drops of water. Once done rinse off and enjoy the difference. For hard to clean or badly turtured sinks you can try a ball of aluminium foil and coke - use it like a polish. The oven is often our worst nightmare. The cooktop is not far behind. But even here we can have a chance to clean without too much hard work or bad chemicals. Of course the best way is to prevent these spills and boil overs ;) For the cooktop some hot water and baking soda will soften the baked on stuff. Simply remove what you can with the hot water and then sprinkle the surface with baking soda. Cover all with the paper towels and if not wet enough add a bit more hot water so all shets are soaked. Leave ove night and wipe clean the next day. The oven is a bit of a problem once the side and back wall are filthy. If baking soda with a pot scrubber won't do the trick get some of these steel pads with soap in it. The soap in them is special in terms that you only need a little bit of water to remove almost anything with them - and they won't scrath enamelled surfaces. On the bottom we often have badly burnt in things that are next to impossible to fully remove. I suggest to cover the same way as the cooktop but also to add some orange oil. Just make a thick paste of baking soda and orange oil and wrok it into the soiled surface. Cover with wet paper towels and leave over night. Now you don't want to flood your oven, so that means you need to use a sponge or thick cloth that is big enough to wipe off the surfaces you soaked the day before. As the orange oil really is oil it pays off to use some alcohol in the cleaning water to get rid of the oil and grease a bit easier. Don't expect to see a clean and shiny surface after one treatment if the oven was badly misused, you might have to repeat the procedure a few times. If in doubt use the soapy steel pads for last clean and before soaking over night again. Three to four treatments are usually enough to clean even the worst disaster that can happen in an oven unless you baked it in for months... 5. Desinfecting and mouldy spots.... As said, the methylated spirit is basically just pure alcohol and kill almost anything that might harm you. But sometimes that just is not enough. And who really wants to spend an hour or longer to clean some mouldy spots in the shower or try to cover the smell by spraying room freshener? As a lst resort for everything I use Hydrogen Peroxide. The supermarket grade is only 3% and usually badly overpriced, so I suggest to get a small canister of pool grade peroxide. Do yourself a favour and ask them to install a tap on it - you don't want to do it yourself unless you already know how bad pool grade peroxide is! For your own safety when handling it I strongly recommend wearing long rubber gloves, nitrile is better but please no latex as it could start to burn when getting in contact with the peroxide. For high grade desinfecting or the removal of mouldy areas I recommend to dilute 1:5, one part of peroxide to 5 parts of water. Only for the mould removal on tiled, plastic, glass or metal surfaces you can use the peroxide pure from the container - but please add face protection when cleaning! Some spray bottles work with peroxide some just start leaking badly, if you want try an old bottle of chlorine based cleaner after really flushing everything out. The peroxide breaks down any organic material it comes into contact with, so not just the mould you want to remove but also your skin or eyes if you allow contact. On the skin you see white areas after contact and they won't go away until all the oxygen in the skin is gone that was left by the peroxide. If you act too late it means you might loose some skin flakes. The sure sign of overlook exposure on your skin is a burning sensation in the area - this only happens when the amount was big enough or your clothes got soaked. On your surfaces to clean you will notice bubbles forming quite quickly - this mean the peroxide is reacting with something, usually organic material. Let it bubble... Once it stops bubbling the surface is either sterile or the peroxide is used up, if it bubbles when adding fresh peroxide onto it then there is still crap left ;) It really helps to brush off the surface after each treatment as a lot of loose material will be flushed out when rinsing off. Once it looks and smells clean again it usually means it is clean :) 6. Special case: Wood... Be it wooden floorboards, furniture or just your chopping board - always try what the manufacturer recommends first! Untreated wood should never be cleaned with anything wet! Sealed wood, like floorboards or things with varnish on it to make it water proof can be cleaned the same way as mentioned above - but I would leave out the ammonia as some wood treatments simply won't tolerate it and might go dull instead of returning nice and shiny - spot testing required if you think you have to use ammonia as well! Orange oil itself makes a great furniture cleaner if the surface is smooth and sealed, but if it is not it means the oil soaks into the wood together with the stuff you want to clean off! It also takes off several paints and types of varnish if you work it hard enough and give it some time, so avoid this and be quick instead of forgetting to finnish the job ;) Always try to wet the surface as little as possible and wipe fully dry as soon as possible! Ok, good start but what is the real benefit? For me the actual benefit is that I know what I am using and exposing myself to. Just reading what is in most cleaning products we find at the supermarket makes me want to clean again after using them, just to remove their residues... I admit it might take some time to get used to mixing and just having a few ingredients for the cleaning but it does work great. Especially if you or your kids are already sensitive to certain chemicals or just of poor health in general you might see the benefit quite quickly. Some people really don't like the smell of ammonia but unless you are sensitive to it there is nothing to worry when using the household grade as we always dilute it down massively anyway. A good way to avoid the worst stink is by mixing it outside with the wind from behind. I won't say that certain commercial products are bad, harmful or not good enough for the job. Some are actually worth to have in some cases but I just say it is better to only have a hand full of chemicals that are not too bad instead of an endless list of things were we don't even know what's inside. For me the best is your surprise when it actually works better than you expected and report your findings here.

Posted by Downunder35m 1 year ago