Eyeball Game

Check it out! How accurate is your eyeballing? -mine, not so good. =) about an average of 6-7Units out.http://woodgears.ca/eyeball/

Topic by ll.13 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Eyeball Yarn

Though I dearly love eyelash yarn, this eyeball yarn takes the cake.It's vitreous humor, from insubordiknit.com:Ever wish you had eyes on the back of your head? Well now you can have them all over your head, bwahahaha...or your neck...or wherever you choose to don your knitted eyeball item.Five colorways of handpainted merino wool with scads of handdyed tussah silk noils, soysilk, organic cotton and ingeo then corespun the yarn thick and thin, poofy and tight, so that it would resemble a mass of muscley eye innards. Spun in, nice and tight, are 13-15 hand felted eyeballs Note -- these are NOT plied in or tied in! They are spun in, part of the actual yarn.They seem to have a podcast too, and promise more background on this yarn in the 4th episode.

Topic by canida 11 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Eyeborg: Filmaker plans to install camera in prosthetic eyeball

"Take a one eyed film maker, an unemployed engineer, and a vision for something that's never been done before and you have yourself the EyeBorg Project. Rob Spence and Kosta Grammatis are trying to make history by embedding a video camera and a transmitter in a prosthetic eye. That eye is going in Robs eye socket, and will record the world from a perspective that's never been seen before."I'm hoping that the eyeball video camera will pave the way for more prosthetic eye hacks. I've want to embed a laser diode into a prosthetic eye for some time now, and just haven't had a candidate who will volunteer their eye. Common Instructables community - how many of you with one eye out there will let me help you become Cyclops!?!Filmmaker plans "Eyeborg" eye-socket camera | ReutersEye Spy: Filmmaker Plans to Install Camera in His Eye Socket | WIREDMore at eyeborgblog.com.via benjaneer

Topic by noahw 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Chips [video]

Topic by JamesRPatrick 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Laser jacket

This laser jacket by Wie-Chieh Shih reminds me of the jacket that Bono wore last year. With 200 diodes in it it is super shiny and dangerous for any eyeballs that come near it. 200 ld stage suit via Make

Topic by fungus amungus 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


I need help understanding

On the computer, when you click"you", then "view profile", in the top right hand corner, what does the eyeball, star, and the question mark mean? I know that they mean views, favorites and comments, but is that the stuff that you viewed, favorited, and commented, or is that the stuff other people did to you or you account.

Topic by MagicHonda 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


interview with a robot (new york times)

NY Times correspondent Amy Harmon chats with Bina48, a robot based on a researcher for artificial intelligence. The robot 'lives' a the Terasem Movement Foundation, Inc, located in Vermont. The robot comes complete with a database of memories for conversation, a peculiar speech cadence and creepy eyeballs to scare the children. [Link]

Topic by mikeasaurus 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


how long untill my sunburst platy gives birth? Answered

I have been able to see the babies eyeballs inside the mothers stomache for about 4 days now she also looks like she swallowed a marble and is swimming up and down the wall of the tank she also doesnt seem to have much intrest in food how long will it be untill she gives birth? oh and she also has the white ball near her anal fin

Question by trinad954 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


123D Design tutorial for technical parts with accurate dimensions?

I'm an engineer with ~7 years of experience using Solidworks (professional CAD software). After hearing about Autodesk 123D Design here on Instructables, I tried to start using it to design and print things with my home 3D printer. However, I'm initially finding it very frustrating to use (more detail on that in a minute) - and I'm not sure if this is just because I'm stuck in my ways with the software I'm used to, or if I'm just trying to use 123D for something it wasn't really intended for. To try and give some concrete examples - I understand that you can create 3D shape primitives (rectangular prisms, cylinders etc) and assign them dimensions when you create them. I also understand that you can create 2D sketch objects and define their dimensions. What I don't find intuitive at all is how you can assign the dimensions of objects relative to each other. For example, say I want to make a 10x10x1mm bracket, with two 2mm diameter circular holes that have their positions on the face defined by the distance from their centers to the edge of the bracket. In a parametric CAD program, that is very easy to do in a 2D sketch and then extrude to a 3D solid. In 123D, I understand that I can create a rectangle primitive and then put holes in it using cylinder primitives - but it seems impossible to define the exact location of those cylinders relative to the edges of the rectangle; also impossible to create a sketch with two circles in it and a dimension defining the distance between their centers. To give another concrete example: at the 4:20 mark in this video (from this Instructable), he draws a circle on top of an existing rectangular part, and then "centers" it by just dragging it around freehand and eyeballing it. Would it be possible to define the center of that circle relative to an edge, corner, or center of that existing rectangle? Or can 123D just not do that? What I'd like to see, if anyone is up for it, is a step-by-step tutorial (preferably in video format) for making some sort of "technical" part where the dimensions matter and it isn't sufficient to just eyeball it and drag things around. e.g. a bracket like this (exact dimensions don't have to be what I drew here, but you get the idea). All of the tutorials I've seen so far - including the official Autodesk ones - seem to just focus on eyeballing it/free-handing dragging parts around.

Topic by Ben Finio 5 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


Eric Wilhelm Talks Halloween Projects on Science Friday

  Today (Friday October 16, 2015) Instructables founder Eric Wilhelm went on Science Friday to talk about some fun Halloween Projects for Science Lovers.  "Green fire, magic mirrors, fiber optic fairy wings—just a few of the ways to geek out this Halloween with do-it-yourself projects. Eric Wilhelm, founder of Instructables, joins Ira to suggest a few of his favorites, like an arduino-powered skull that follows you as you move, or truly realistic edible eyeballs (sorry, peeled grapes.)" Listen and follow along with this fun collection of projects.

Topic by Penolopy Bulnick 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Haywired: Pointless (Yet Awesome) Projects for the Electronically Inclined

I just received my copy of Haywired: Pointless (Yet Awesome) Projects for the Electronically Inclined, which is a book of 13 electronics projects and techniques including a moving eyeball portrait, a super capacitor car, and wire wrapping and soldering how-tos. I previewed the book a few months ago, and think Haywired has a great mix of projects, and inspires you to learn how electronics, motors, and sensors work by giving you hands-on instructions to actually make them work. It is a great first book for the budding inventor or engineer. (As I state on the back of the book!)If you do any of these projects, please post an Instructable with your take!Update: Mike Rigsby has posted an Instructable from the book:Flashlight Without Batteries.

Topic by ewilhelm 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Wanted Steampunk Hobbyists

Do you make cool steampunk equipment or art? Would you like to show it off in another venue? One of my hobbies is writing RPGs and I have a steampunk RPG but it has a problem. It needs your talent. It needs art. There is so much talent in the steampunk ecosystem that sometimes it can be hard to get eyeballs on your work. This is one way you can do that. Like I said, this is a hobby for me and I give my games away for free but I can put your work with your name or pseudonym and website in the book and on the blog. It's just one more way to get people looking at your work. I'm looking for tasteful original artwork, photographs of costumes (hopefully on someone) and equipment (again hopefully being used by someone, but if photographed interestingly enough could stand on it's own). You can contact me through instructables or at Steampunkfitters.com I hope to hear from you!

Topic by EmmettO 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Can any tiny spy cam emulate the basic human visual range/angle?

I ask because i made a large almost featureless spherical mascot head which i dont want to ruin by cutting a gaping view hole through the front, iv tried the stretched mesh fabric approach but it doesnt look right at all. The current version has a wide slit so my horizontal vision is great but iv got almost no vertical vision, im taller than average and need to see where people around me are around me so i need an improved ability to look downwards. So iv been thinking about one of those tiny spycams linked to a screen mounted inside (perhaps vr goggles), is there a camera with the kind of wide viewing angle you naturally get out of your eyeballs, so i can angle my head down and actually see the ground reasonably close to my feet?

Question by ambientvoid 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


I want to get into Slalom (a type of skating)?

Hello, so I want to get into Slalom.  If you don't know what Slalom is, its basically really advanced skating with cones, here's a good example: http://wimp.com/girlslalom/ I have a few questions about skating in general: 1. Where can I get good skates, where/what should I look for? 2. What it more important: Balance, or agility? 3. How can I improve my balance/agility? A few questions for Slalom people: 1. Is there a term for people who play Slalom? 2. Where can I get some good cones? (I've been looking at these, but they're a bit expensive: http://www.skatecrazy.net/products/cones.html 3. I don't have any skates currently, I was thinking of getting Slalom skates instead of recreational skates.  I thought this would be cheaper and I'm probably going to end up getting them eventually but I don't know if that would make a difference starting out. I'm looking at these skates if I get Slalom-specific skates: http://www.skatecrazy.net/products/sebafr1.htm I'm eyeballing these skates for recreational skates but I don't know if they would be a good choice: http://www.sportchalet.com/product/300425_3041447.do

Question by bclinton 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


(newsletter) Seed Bomb, DIY Sunscreen, USB Cigar...

Sign-up for this newsletter: Welcome back! Check out our 4th of July Guide, and use the long weekend to finish some Instructables for these awesome contests!We've got three fantastic contests this week, so get to work turning your great ideas and half-done projects into finished Instructables and enter!Pocket-Sized Contest - Think small, and win a custom laser-etched Leatherman!Get in the Garden Contest - Enter any Instructable with a gardening theme and win an awesome computer-controlled indoor composting machine from NatureMill!Art of Sound Contest - Share any music or sound-related Instructable, and win an incredible custom hi-fi tower set with subwoofer, monster speakers, and more!! Lego Combination Safe Altoids Travel Games - Pocket Size Fun Make Faux Rocks Homemade Stickers Keep cool and cook up some tasty food this weekend! Win a custom laser-etched Leatherman! Audio Cassette Loop Crocheted Eyeball Homemade Sunscreen DIY Under-Cabinet Lighting Make a Seed Bomb Recover an Old Bicycle Seat Chocolate Pasta Personalized Garden Stepping Stones Win a cool computer-controlled indoor composter! Win these custom hi-fi speakers! 4-3/4 oz Ultra-light Backpacking Kitchen Business Card with Mints Fretless Guitar with a Glass Fretboard USB Cigar Flash Memory Sign-up for this newsletter:

Topic by fungus amungus 9 years ago


Halloween Food Contest Winners

Congratulations to all the finalists and winners for the Halloween Food Contest.  This year brought a host of inspiring, terrifying, and ghoulish projects.  As always, it was a labor of love to have to sort through such impressive projects to choose the final nine.   Monkey Brain Cake took our top spot, with its glorious presentation and gruesome concept.  It took three days to sculpt this masterpiece, and it shows.  The photos are clean, compelling, and informative. The write-up is informative, easy to follow, and injected with humor and a real sense of the author’s personality.  Many congrats to BubbleandSweet  and thanks for sharing this epic project with us. Second prize went to three fantastic entries:  hungryhappenings’ Bleeding Cake Ball Brains showcases a clever use of several techniques, and exploits an ice cube tray to its best effect.  The finished product is subtle until interacted with, adding a delicious element of surprise.  The photos are bright and clear, and the write-up is easy to follow. The author also offers helpful suggestions for addressing trouble spots and how to make individual elements really stand out. chefsea’s Assorted Eyeballs and Sockets impressed us with a clever and unconventional use of ingredients to create an eye-popping result.  So much care and detail was put into creating such a gory, and yet appetizing snack.  The write up is deli-eye-tfully punny, and the photos well illustrated the technique.  The final result looks almost too realistic to eat! Most Awesome Halloween Cake comes to us from new author, licenseless.  While the write-up is a little hard to digest, the concept and execution are impressive.   Every part of the cake and its accoutrements were hand-sculpted to a sublimely sanguinary effect.   Small details like adding the veins to the heart before covering it in fondant are a great tribute to the amount of skill that went into creating this entry.  The third prize slots were gobbled up by five fantastic entries. Candy Corn on the Cob by alaskantomboy stormed the Internet and garnered over 100K impressive page views.  This was a very simple execution on a super clever idea.  Kudos to the great work, informative write-up, and fun photos that make this entry shine. How To Make Spider Cake Pops With Webs by sugarkissed.net is an adorable take on a modern classic.  It combines clever techniques with fun, illustrated graphics to provide a sweet Halloween treat. Ewwy Gooey Slime Filled Cupcakes by Make.Bake.Celebrate is a cheerfully disgusting sweet that could easily be tailored to suit several themes.  Quite impressive is the author’s ability to match the internal slime to the external hairy eyeball tumors, yet maintaining very different textures and mouthfeel.  Perfect balance of gross and cute, and extra points to the fun photo styling.  Halloween Stamped Tortilla Chips by wold630 introduces a fun way to liven up even the simplest of party snack.  With such clear photos, the descriptive text becomes almost unnecessary.  This is another project that can easily be modified to suit any occasion. A brilliantly simple technique applied to a very versatile, crowd friendly food, capitalizing on the Halloween theme. danlynne07 had almost too many great entries to choose from!  Haunted Grave Cupcakes is a very cute, hand-sculpted design that would surely take the cake at any party.    A very cute and clever, well-crafted design. All in all, this year brought a very impressive showing from authors both seasoned and new.   We appreciate the amount of effort everyone put into their creations, and look forward to next year's crop of spooktacular snacks and freakish fare.  

Topic by scoochmaroo 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Banner/rollover ads with uncontrolled sound and auto start

Why are you allowing ads with sound? Perhaps you should have your ad agency go here http://www.langoor.com/ethics-in-internet-selling-and-advertising/ and learn some ethics. There are ad placement firms who adhere to guidelines that help to maximize a user's experience rather than irritating the crap out of them. They seem to be doing pretty well.  Reducing a user's experience may generate you and you ad service some short term revenue, but it will ultimately reduce the user's willingness to buy the product of the offending advertiser, and will drive eyeballs off of your site.  I clicked on the "First Aid Kit for Hostile Environments" 'ible in my Mail app. My browser opened, as usual, and opened my instructable page. Then the music started. Thinking that I might have lingered over something too long, I closed the tab, went back to the mail, and clicked again. Same story. This happened three different times. ALL of the ads in the top banner did this. Idunno what the first one was, but the second one was for some Republican politician, and the third was for Mercury (the car, not the element).  I have not resorted to ad-blocking software because I believe in your site and want you guys to get paid for all your hard work. (That may soon change, though.) I haven't bought a pro membership because I don't publish anything or spend gobs of time here, and I've been a member so long that you gandfathered in most of the pro benefits for me. I'm relatively casual and limited in my use. Can you help a brother out and stop these types of ads, or are you gonna tell me to just suck it up because I'm a freeloader non-pro member?

Topic by pedalmonkey 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Halloween Party

Want to liven up your Halloween party with some tasty and gross treats? Of course you do! There's nothing better than watching guests hesitating to eat a delicious snack because it looks like it might still be alive. So get right to it and check out these Instructables for some inspiration for your upcoming Halloween event!If you do make something awesome this year be sure to document it and enter it into our DIY Halloween Contest!Also see: Halloween Decorations Halloween Costumes Halloween for Kids Pumpkin Carving Halloween Makeup Halloween Masks Make a Bloody Valentine's Heart by theprojectmaker When the heart is cut open, blood gushes out, revealing anything you hid inside. Bloody good! How to Make Edible Glowing UV Reactive JELLO by hairyconiption Make some Jell-O that glows in blacklight for some edible alien guts. Doll serving dish by zieak This one is so simple and monstrously effective. See who's willing to dip their chip inside a gutted doll. Biohazard Halloween Candy by praguequest Pack up a selection of treats and glowing lights that make it look like you're distributing toxic waste from your porch! Frankenstein Finger Cookies by Sandoz338 Watch in delight as your guests eat up some chopped off fingers. These are complete with fingernails, blood, and even some hair on top. Frog Spawn and Swamp Water Tea by whiteoakart Create a disgusting-looking elixir with some white tapioca and a sweet drink on top. See how many people you can convince that these are eggs or tiny little tadpoles. Finger Food by caitlinsdad Rated PG, pretty gross, may cause you to toss your cookies...If eating a hot dog itself was not bad enough, this is worse. Smoked salmon skull by zieak Smoked salmon stuck onto an anatomical skull makes for a wonderfully creepy fleshy appetizer. Blood Splattered Extra Satanic Deviled Eggs by technoplastique Make those "deviled" eggs a little more evil with some nasty colors and splatters of blood! Edible zombie eyeballs! by impulse94 Zombies want to eat humans, but who says it can't go the other way around? It's time for some payback!

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Halloween = Success at Instructables HQ

Welcome to Letters from the Editor, a new feature we're trying out!  This week I'd like to share some highlights from our recent Halloween Show & Tell party. It's been a busy week here at Instructables HQ.  Halloween is a favorite holiday around here, and when we do it, we do it up right.  This year we did a series of in-house projects and guides to bring you the best of Instructables Halloween, and we went all out. Our ramp-up to Halloween culminated in a community-wide Show & Tell last Friday night.  HQ was transformed into a proper party hub as we socialized, snacked, and shared our latest projects with the crowd.  The night kicked off with an impressive costume by Peter and Nick Matsakis (winners of our costume contest!) inspired by the game Plants vs. Zombies.  Peter dressed as a Threepeater with working pea shooters, and Nick was Crazy Dave.  Why?  Because he's CRAAAAAAZY! Other highlights from the Show & Tell included Grathio Labs' Secret Knock Detecting Gumball Machine (you have to know the secret knock to get the gum!), and Robert Hermes' impressive Covert Public Messages, which you can only see when looking through polarized lenses. Very cool stuff. And let's not forget the food!  Drawing from our library of creepy Halloween treats, we recreated Edible Zombie Eyeballs omitting the goo to make it vegan-friendly, Pumpkin Bread in mini muffin form, Extra Satanic Deviled Eggs with a wasabi twist, and Halloween Candy Bark in various creepy colors.  Additionally, you can look forward to new Instructables detailing the making of peanut butter and chocolate Buckeyes and my Towering Pumpkin Cheesecake! All in all, it's been a very successful Halloween season.  Next we look to all of the great contests we have running.  Did you know that Humana's giving away a Dream Vacation to one very lucky innovative user!  Enter now! And don't forget to check back next week to cast your votes for our Halloween Contest finalists.  We weren't the only ones to go all out - you impressed us with almost 400 entries already! Until next time, all the best. Sarah P.S. for even more pictures, look here and here!

Topic by scoochmaroo 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Specifics of building a multi-stage coilgun?

So I recently decided that I wanted to build a coilgun. I already knew how they function, and after some light research, I've got the main design already laid out. What I'm looking for now is some more detailed input on the exact power requirements, circuitry, etc. Specifically: Firing a standard .177 steel BB, I want to use many small coils in series as opposed to one/few large ones. From my understanding, this will provide better end speed while keeping each coil's power draw relatively lower, and thus safer. (Am I right about this?) How many coils should I use, what would be overkill, etc? Each coil will be triggered sequentially by a IR LED/photocell trigger system rigged through tiny holes drilled across the barrel. Will a simple on/off circuit suffice, or will the projectile pass by too quickly for the full charge to release? If so, I assume I need a system to trigger a full discharge when tripped. Correct or not, and if so, how? I'm also considering fitting an extra gate at the end to trigger a circuit to bleed any remaining charge. Ideas on this? What size of capacitors should I use, and how would I charge them? The only thing Google can seem to turn up is camera flash circuits, but I'd much rather have one tailor-built to the system's exact levels. I'm going to use a press/hold switch to charge them, and would like an automatic shutoff with an LED that comes on when they are charged, but turns off when I release the button. Kind of like a camera flash, actually. I'd like to fit it with a re-chargeable battery. What sort of power is required here? How many firings would I likely get per charge, etc? What sort of muzzle velocity can I expect? I don't want to kill bears with it, but soda cans would be nice. I don't want to waste my time fabricating it only to be able to stop it with my eyeball. Lastly, are there any other points of concern or things I should know? Thanks for any input, and if everything ends up coming together nicely, I'll be sure to properly document the process for everyone's enjoyment. :)

Topic by Skye Pyro 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Help on clay modeling/molding intricate parts

I had posted this on another forum asking for advice as well, but I haven't received a reply in days and I figured that the community there was more into the artistic craft sort of stuff. I like the engineering mindset of this community far better as I tour around here a lot looking at neat instructables, so maybe you guys can offer me some solid advice. I have a series of small metal parts with minute details on them, and I want to take them and create clay replicas of them. I want these clay replicas to essentially be spot-on accurate to the original and be durable; not brittle, heavy, and perhaps slightly flexible. Essentially, though it may sound strange, I'm working on a World War II movie project. I don't have the fire-arms necessary for it, and I don't have a reason to use real fire-arms, so I want to create dummy replicas that have believably working systems that of course are just made of clay and aren't capable of firing. I'm also of course going to create miscellaneous objects, such as papier mache helmets and whatnot. At the bottom are a few examples of what I need constructed. I don't know what type of clay would be the best for this; I can afford to have it be slightly flexible, but not rubbery. It would be handled and roughed around a lot and couldn't be brittle, lest it shatter. I also think that I would probably have to make a mold of the metal parts, but what material should I use? Some sort of molding latex, or clay? Would the clay stick to the metal, and if so, can I oil the metal to make it easy to remove, or would that interfere with the chemistry of the clay somehow? I've also considered maybe using papier mache to mold the parts, as I'm sure that it would be tough. Perhaps I could achieve this by carefully cutting the strips? I've considered that clay may not even be the best material for this, although it may certainly help with molds; tutorials on how to create molds for complex objects are also appreciated, since these have internal chambers and whatnot. Maybe I can eyeball it and cut the parts out of foam, and then coat it with some sort of hardening resin? I don't know, I'm certainly up for suggestions here. Thanks in advance! P.S. Oh, by the way, if any moderators feel that it would be better suited in the "Burning Questions" subforum feel free to move it there; I wasn't sure whether or not to post there since I simply want advice, not someone to make an instructable for me.

Topic by Phaethon 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Easy automated method to find chronological age of an integrated circuit design? Answered

This is not a question related to a homework or career assignment. This question is an existential question. Specifically, the thing that I am wondering if it exists, or not, is an easy and automated method for finding the chronological date, e.g. a year, Anno Domini (AD) or Common Era (CE), when a named integrated circuit (IC) was introduced.  Preferably this method exists in the form of a free resource on the Web. As an example, the well known 555 timer IC was introduced in the year 1971, and I am reasonably confident that was the year, because the Wikipedia article titled "555 timer IC", https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/555_timer_IC contains the words: "Introduced in 1971 by American company Signetics, the 555 is still in widespread use..." And I assume that statement is totally true, because if I can't trust the people who edit Wikipedia, I mean, who can I trust? ;-) Unfortunately, Wikipedia does not have a fact-filled article for almost every IC every sold.  In contrast, a place like www.alldatasheet.com has data sheets for almost every IC ever sold, but, it turns out, the data sheet does not always reveal the year the IC was introduced. To clarify this further, the thing I really want to exist, would be like a web site, with a name like: www.howoldismyic.com, or www.howoldisthisic.com, or www.icdob.com etc. (Please note that none of those URLs point to actual existing web sites, at the time of this writing.) Moreover, I am fantasizing this web site would contain a form, for to enter the name of the IC to look up, and then after hitting the "Submit" button, it would magically tell me what year that IC was introduced to the world, and maybe also which semiconductor company gave birth to it. As some example input and output, the query NE555 would return:  NE555, 1971, Signetics(r) As an additional twist to this fantasy, the query, LM555, would return the same thing, and this magical web page would like, know, that LM555 was a later version of the same IC, except produced by a different manufacturer, namely National(r); i.e LM555 was National's version of the 555 timer . If you have read this far, I congratulate you!  And I appreciate your eyeball time! If you are wondering about my motivation for this question, it is just that think the year an IC was introduced would be a very useful metric, like for answering more specific questions, like: The SG3524 and LTC3780 are ICs used for making switchmode power supplies.  Which of these ICs is more modern? I.e which IC was introduced latest? It turns out, the answer to this question is: The SG3524 is older (introduced first).  The LTC3780 is younger (introduced second). The SG3524 was introduced (I am guessing) in 1977, and that guess is based on some cryptic scribbles in a data sheet for the SG3524, published by Texas Instruments(r). The exact characters were: "SLVS077D – APRIL 1977 – REVISED FEBRUARY 2003" and I am just naively interpreting that blurb to mean the SG3524 was introduced in 1977. Regarding the LTC3780, I think it was introduced some time in the 1990s.  Looking at its datasheet, from Linear Technology(r), I could not find an obvious description of what year it was first introduced, but the first page mentions some US Patent numbers, and looking up those patent numbers, gives dates circa the early 1990s. So the LTC3780 is the younger than the SG3524. However to find that answer, I kind of had to do a bunch of reading of datasheets, and US Patent numbers, and that method took a little bit of work. My question:  Is there an easier way to find out how old (or young) an IC is?  More specifically is there an existing resource on the Web, like a free database, or a IC history site, or something where I can essentially "look up" the year an IC was introduced. By the way there is no absolutely zero urgency attached to this question.  So please answer if you feel like it,  and don't if you don't. I thank you for reading this.  My name is Jack A Lopez, and I approve of this message.

Question by Jack A Lopez 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago