Build a wood greenhouse - Guide to build it -

I built a wood greenhouse on my backyard. Free guide:http://www.usa-gardening.com/greenhouse/greenhouse.html

Posted by jardinier 5 years ago


Greenhouse Heating

Hi, does anyone have any suggestions on a cheap efficient Heating System I can build myself for a Greenhouse?

Posted by lamar850 6 years ago


can i make a greenhouse with double glazed windows

CAN I GROW PLANTS THAT WOULD GROW IN A GREENHOUSE IN MY CONSERVATORY?

Posted by frogcity 8 years ago


Arduino can control the temp, humidity, light, CO2 into my greenhouse?

Hello, can anyone tell me if Arduino can control in a greenhouse these parameters? - temperature - humidity - CO2 - light ..? I need for a temp, humidity rate, CO2 rate and so on the Arduino activates different tools in my greenhouse. Thanks!

Posted by NeroInferno 8 years ago


Tripod greenhouse - cheap, easy, high volume

http://urbangreenhouse.blogspot.com/2011/06/stick-fork-in-it-its-done.html Currently in Paris to start an urban farming collective around this, details on that blog. Thoughts?

Posted by SolarFlower_org 7 years ago


Vaulted Dome Aquaponics Greenhouse Design

What do you think about this greenhouse design? It is for an aquaponics system. 192 sq ft so no permit is required in many areas. 9ft tall by 16ft wide, vaulted dome with center support for strong snow holding ability (snow should mostly slide off the vaulted dome anyway). Do you think people would want this in their yard if I offered to sell it to them?

Posted by Jaycub 2 years ago


Computers Used to Heat Conservatory

Waste Heat to Be Used by Conservatory ------------------------- Heat generated by the Univ. of Notre Dame’s high-performance computing department is being used to heat a local greenhouse. The department has placed a containerized data center next to the Ella Morris and Muessel-Ellison Botanical Conservatories and Potawatomi Greenhouse in South Bend, Ind. The waste heat generated by working servers is piped into the greenhouse where it is used to keep succulents and other desert plants warm. CleanTechnica.com reports the university is expected to lower its equipment cooling costs by $100,000. The city will save $70,000 it spends to heat the conservatory. The use of the waste heat is part of the Botanical Society of South Bend’s plan to help make the greenhouses self-sufficient due to budget cuts. ------------------------------ Pretty smart. Picture is of my "brain cactus".  

Posted by AngryRedhead 8 years ago


off-grid solar/wind powered greenhouse

 Hello DIYers, I am planning on building a simple greenhouse (hoop-house) this spring. The construction will be for an 8'x12'x8'H design. Building this part is wonderfully easy. The hard part is building the off-grid power to supply power to the greenhouse fans and hydroponic pump(s). I'm not sure where to start with the plans.  Here is what I am needing some guidance: Do I build a PV panel then design my electrical needs around that...or vice-versa?? (I have forty 2W solar cells on order) I know i will need batteries...how many 12V batteries do I need? Type? What is the best configuration for the batteries? Should I use a DC hydro pump or AC hydro pump? DC or AC fan for cooling? Future plans include using an arduino to be the main controller.... Please keep in mind that this is a small(ish) hobby greenhouse and I hope to build it to be fully off-grid, at least for the summer months. I have the time to build it, but don't have the know-how for fully designing it (electrical stuff confuses and scares the crap outta me). I'm not against keeping the price low, but am willing to spend a few extra bucks to make sure it's designed right.

Posted by Tweac-it 8 years ago


Can convection be used to drive a passive dehumidifier?

Ok, I have a couple of radiators and a greenhouse that is too humid. In winterr can convection drive fluid from a radiator mounted low in the warm greenhouse to a second radiator mounted outside in the cold and then back to create a chilled metal radiator that will have water condense on it and drip into the soil.

Posted by drewgrey 7 years ago


building winter greenhouse.... need ideas

Hi there,I live in Boston, MA and I am looking for some advice on Greenhouse construction for winter gardening only (and vegetables that are appropriate for that as well). I am looking to build a greenhouse that I can put up in the fall and take down in the spring for growing a winter garden. It will have to be able to be taken apart into its components and stored in a shed in summer months since my family has no need for it then. Due to the fact that it will be used in the winter, it will have to be highly insulated and have a heat sink that will be able to help maintain a constant growing temperature for the plants inside. Ideally I would like to avoid expending much energy heating the greenhouse. I am, of course, also doing this on a budget. Here is what I have come up with so far. 1. I will use triple-wall or 5 wall polycarbonate panels for the walls of the greenhouse2. I have found a few insulating products that look like they could be useful3. I am thinking of using a solar collector water heater as part of the heat sink- easy to construct on my own : https://www.instructables.com/id/Solar-Thermal-Water-Heater-For-Less-Than-Five-Doll/ that could circulate hot water into the heat sink4. I am learning about heat sinks and thinking that I want to use the simplest design and organic materials (mud, rocks, or water) to hold the heat during the day and release it at night.5. The greenhouse footprint can’t be larger than 8’ x 10’ 6. I prefer the simplest construction that meets my needs (and the easiest to put up and take down)Questions that I have:1. What are the possibilities for using compost as a source of heat?2. What about a PVC frame?3. How would I circulate hot water through the heat sink?4. What are methods to reduce daily management of the project?5. Types of hinges to use?6. What type of material should I place the greenhouse on?- it will be sited on the concrete area around our swimming pool and I don’t know what sort of insulation is necessary after that. I had the idea of wood pallets with insulation inside them but that may not be enough at all.7. Any ideas of ways to re-use materials to do this cheaply and reduce waste?8. Any suggestions on the optimal shape of the greenhouse roof/sides to increase heat retention and circulation of warmer air.9. Any suggestions of retailers that might have the materials that I am looking for.Some links that have been useful so far:http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/solar-gh.html#storagehttp://growerssupply.com/farm/supplies/cat1;gs1_greenhouse_building_materials;gs1_corrugated_sheets_panels.html

Posted by ocea46 10 years ago


need ideas on greenhouse

Hi there,I live in Boston, MA and I am looking for some advice on Greenhouse construction for winter gardening only (and vegetables that are appropriate for that as well). I am looking to build a greenhouse that I can put up in the fall and take down in the spring for growing a winter garden. It will have to be able to be taken apart into its components and stored in a shed in summer months since my family has no need for it then. Due to the fact that it will be used in the winter, it will have to be highly insulated and have a heat sink that will be able to help maintain a constant growing temperature for the plants inside. Ideally I would like to avoid expending much energy heating the greenhouse. I am, of course, also doing this on a budget. Here is what I have come up with so far. 1. I will use triple-wall or 5 wall polycarbonate panels for the walls of the greenhouse2. I have found a few insulating products that look like they could be useful3. I am thinking of using a solar collector water heater as part of the heat sink- easy to construct on my own : https://www.instructables.com/id/Solar-Thermal-Water-Heater-For-Less-Than-Five-Doll/ that could circulate hot water into the heat sink4. I am learning about heat sinks and thinking that I want to use the simplest design and organic materials (mud, rocks, or water) to hold the heat during the day and release it at night.5. The greenhouse footprint can’t be larger than 8’ x 10’ 6. I prefer the simplest construction that meets my needs (and the easiest to put up and take down)Questions that I have:1. What are the possibilities for using compost as a source of heat?2. What about a PVC frame?3. How would I circulate hot water through the heat sink?4. What are methods to reduce daily management of the project?5. Types of hinges to use?6. What type of material should I place the greenhouse on?- it will be sited on the concrete area around our swimming pool and I don’t know what sort of insulation is necessary after that. I had the idea of wood pallets with insulation inside them but that may not be enough at all.7. Any ideas of ways to re-use materials to do this cheaply and reduce waste?8. Any suggestions on the optimal shape of the greenhouse roof/sides to increase heat retention and circulation of warmer air.9. Any suggestions of retailers that might have the materials that I am looking for.Some links that have been useful so far:http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/solar-gh.html#storagehttp://growerssupply.com/farm/supplies/cat1;gs1_greenhouse_building_materials;gs1_corrugated_sheets_panels.html

Posted by ocea46 10 years ago


'Revolutionary' CO2 maps zoom in on greenhouse gas sources

Researchers now have a better view of where carbon dioxide is being emitted thanks to Vulcan, a research project led by Kevin Gurney, an assistant professor at Purdue. This map shows where CO2 is being emitted in the continental United States in 10-kilometer grids and combines data from sources including factories, automobiles on highways and power plants. The map offers more than 100 times the detail of previous inventories of carbon dioxide. The image displays metric tons of carbon per year per grid in a logarithmic base-10 scale.more at Physorg

Posted by ewilhelm 10 years ago


Ultralight Portable Greenhouse

I have always wanted to grow a dwarf fruit tree or tropical tree (10-15 ft tall), but living in a townhouse I don't have room to winter a tree indoors. I was wondering if anyone has ever heard of this being done for a single tree? Kind of like a "tree phonebooth" for winter, potentially with a heater run from my outdoor electrical outlet. Any thoughts on where to start? If we can get a theory together I will build it and post it.

Posted by karlmarks 11 years ago


My instructables vanished

After I posted 2 new instructables I noticed that my past instructables were deleted.  One was a featured post called "Build a Greenhouse for under $25"  Is there any chance my past postings can be recovered?

Posted by gailgates 8 years ago


Uses for old and broken projectors/overheads

Our school, for some reason has a lot of partially dismantled and broken projectors. This year, all the classrooms have also been installed with a fancier ceiling-projector that connects to laptops and computers instead of just reflecting pieces of overhead paper. Because it was only recently that the school greenhouse came into use, it's been used as storage. While we could recycle them, I think they could be turned into something useful (preferably for the greenhouse), but I don't have any ideas. I'd like some ideas or for someone to try and build something. The only idea I've had was to turn it into a planter or pot, but apparently the bulbs won't work with plant lights and wouldn't be bright enough.

Posted by Fii 7 years ago


Received an email saying the instructables is featured but not featured in site

I got a mail saying my green house instructables is fetured. But it is not showing up in site as featured. https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-Your-Own-Greenhouse-Construct-Plant-and-Care/ Kindly look into this issue. I had given a considerable amount of time in making it. Passion Make

Posted by Passion Make 2 years ago


Green indoor gardening

I have had an interest in building a greenhouse like area with flouresent bulbs, automated water, and climate control. For the water i could hook up a hose on a timer to a bit of pvc but what is the best way to get proper climate control. What is the desired composition of a water? I guess the question is how do i get nutrient water and proper vitamins straight to a plant?

Posted by Mikethebuilder 10 years ago


Text boxes in instructable pictures change shape and position.

Every time I open my new instructable (high end greenhouse) for some minor editing, or viewing comments, I notice textboxes have moved, sometimes even outside the pictures. Editing puts them into shape, but next time they are back in the wrong place. This can make the instructable somewhat confusing and makes it look sloppy. Anyone had the same problem, solutions?

Posted by BobS 7 years ago


More Old Light Bulb Action!

Instructables users have inspired others yet again. Using LinuxH4x0r's Light Bulb Greenhouse and the dual homemade responses to the $650 Light Bulb Lamp--by bumpus and CYNICALifornia--as a starting point, Treehugger has added to the list of ways to reuse old incandescent light bulbs. Plenty of options to both make something useful and help protect the environment at the same time.Link

Posted by joshf 10 years ago


Low-Footprint Lamp, DIY Wind Turbine, Energy Usage Meter

  Low-Footprint Lamp DIY Wind Turbine Energy Usage Monitor Build a Solar Tracker Stationary Bike Power Garden Rain Barrels DIY Solar Panel Recycled Window Greenhouse Pringles Wind Turbine Bike Wheel Generator Home Solar Panels Homemade Sun Jar Water Flow Sensor Solar Thermal Collector Energy Saving Tools  

Posted by randofo 8 years ago


Home Energy Monitor, Reduce Your Impact, Earth Day

  Home Energy Monitor Reduce Your Impact Earth Day The California Cooler Build a 60 Watt Solar Panel Start a Community Garden Composting Energy Efficient Home Design Ride Your Bike in Style Solar Water Heater Geodesic Dome Greenhouse Energy Saving Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Pallet Compost Bin Rain Water Collector

Posted by randofo 8 years ago


The World is a Complicated Place: "Eat whale and save the planet" - Norwegian lobby

This strikes me as laughable, but at least the issue is being properly framed. "Eat whale and save the planet" - Norwegian lobbyBy Alister Doyle, Environment CorrespondentOSLO (Reuters) - Eat a whale and save the planet, a Norwegian pro-whaling lobby said on Monday of a study showing that harpooning the giant mammals is less damaging to the climate than farming livestock.Environmental group Greenpeace dismissed the survey, saying almost every kind of food was more climate friendly than meat.The survey, focused on whale boats' fuel use, showed that a kilo (2.2 lbs) of whale meat represented just 1.9 kilo (4.2 lbs) of greenhouse gases against 15.8 for beef, 6.4 for pork and 4.6 for chicken."Basically it turns out that the best thing you can do for the planet is to eat whale meat compared to other types of meat," said Rune Froevik of the High North Alliance, which represents the interests of coastal communities in the Arctic."Greenhouse gas emissions caused by one meal of beef are the equivalent of eight meals of whale meat," the study said.The Norwegian-based Alliance said it was the first to measure the "carbon footprint" of whaling. Fish and seafood was comparable to whale meat with relatively low emissions.Norway and Japan, the two main whaling nations, are seeking new arguments to promote whale meat after years of condemnation from anti-whaling nations for breaking with a 1986 moratorium on all hunts meant to save many whale species from extinction.Oslo says, for instance, that the small minke whales it hunts are plentiful in the North Atlantic and that a 2008 Norwegian quota of 1,052 animals will not harm stocks. The meat is eaten mostly as steaks or in stews

Posted by ewilhelm 10 years ago


Low pressure pneumatic grid (1 to 4 psi) to use small wind, small hydro and small solar power?

I have used low pressure air and a simple "airlift pump"  to cycle water around a "pallet  Garden" since August.  This meant that very little water was being used but the plants were growing really well.   the air comes from an aquarium bubble pump and it is about 1 psi.  The pallet garden is almost 20 ft from the little bubble pump.   Recently I decided to do something similar in my greenhouse, but it is 120 ft from the little pump and there is no electrical socket close.  So reluctantly I bought another 120 ft of 1/4 inch tubing to send the air to the greenhouse.  I didn't expect it to work at that distance.  But it is working great. Why not use air instead of electricity to move the energy from "toy" windmills in gardens? Or from low head small water power?  I bet anyone could make a compressor to make 1 PSI.  It is orders of magnitude easier than making a direct water pump or converting the energy to electrical and then back again in a pump.  An airlift pump is just a vertical tube in the water.    How simple is that!   and it is darn cheap too.  You can use this for pumping water (Highest I ever got was 18 ft with 1 psi) or just bubbling air into a fishpond or to actually move the water in small water features.   Or of course in the pallet garden or in aquaponics.  And even thought this energy is useful at that scale it can never ever be made worthwhile to share it electrically.  But maybe your grid could extend to your neighbours garden too?  You could have an interconnector if you or they have a bit of excess pneumatic power!

Posted by gaiatechnician 5 years ago


DIY & Make Groups Update: Phoenix, SF, NYC, MIT

Phoenix DIY - Meeting 6: This WednesdayWhat: Phoenix DIY 6When: Wednesday, March 26 7:30pmWhere: Conspire Phoenix901 N 5th St (on the NE corner of 5th St and Garfield)Phoenix, AZ 85006 [map]This month's meeting will be outside at Conspire. Please bring a chair or two to share! Also bring a jacket in case it gets chilly.This month's presenters:Mark Rehorst: SPICE circuit simulation software tutorialMark will lead us through the basics and an example of using Linear Technology's free SPICE simulator: SwitcherCAD. You can predict how your circuit will function before you build it! Alex Schlegel: Build your own GreenhouseAlex built a backyard greenhouse equipped with solar powered circulation fans, and he'll share with us how he did it.full details!Make: SFThe next meeting will be at TechShop April 6th. It will be followed by a San Francisco meeting on April 20th.Full Details!Make:NYC Meeting 5 - Thursday, March 27th, 6PMWhat can a group of Makers do with a tank of helium? We're not sure! Care to find out? The sixth Make:NYC Meeting includes:Challenge: BlimpsYou've got brains, we've got blimps. Two teams will compete to make an ordinary RC blimp perform extraordinarily. Arrive on time to make sure you get in on all the lighter-than-air action.Meeting time is 6:00PM.Location:Make Offices, 2nd Floor (Google Map)325 Gold St. at Flatbush Ave.Brooklyn, NY 11201full details!MITERS - 04/04Friday night is build party night with MIT MITERS.full details!If you know any more details about these events or have any additional announcements, please post them here.

Posted by randofo 10 years ago


How many hours of direct sunlight comes from north of the east west line?

We all know that the sun rises in the east and sets in the west.  And it is true 2 days a year!   The other 363 days it is untrue.  I found a neat little website sollumis.com that  gives a  visual representation  of the sunlight at any day of the year and at any location and  in summer quite a lot comes from the northeast and northwest in the mornings and evenings. (where I live at about 49 degrees north). I thought the rays represented 20 minutes of sun travel originally but now I am not so sure because the hours of daylight in a day do not correspond with the number of degrees of sunlight.  Does anybody know how fast the sun goes down? Does it appear to speed up as it goes down in summer or does it appear at its fastest around noon?  If it goes down faster than it goes at noon then there will be less hours of sun north of the east west line but if it goes slower, there will be more hours of sun north of that line. I would like to know how many hours of light  come from north of the east west line so that I can  give a guesstimate about how much more light my lean away greenhouse collects compared to a lean to.  The various websites are good for giving the sun up and sundown times and angles but none I have found give the corresponding times for the sun passing  the east west line in morning and evening. It is a tricky question and I can make a physical model to figure it out but maybe someone already knows the answer. In the diagram the sunrise is 5.11 am and sunset is 9.17 pm and the sun rises at 52 degrees and goes down at 308 degrees.  The degrees divided by 360 do not tally with the hours divided by 24  0.67 for the hours and 0,71 for the degrees. Thanks for any help Brian

Posted by gaiatechnician 6 years ago


Javier Fernandez-Han Wins 2009 Invent Your World Challenge

Invent Your World WinnersView more Microsoft Word documents from Youth Venture.http://socialentrepreneurship.change.org/blog/view/youth_taking_action_a_15_year_old_invents_the_futureI acted as a judge for this competition, and the winning Versatile system was of my favorites from among many interesting and thoughtful entries. Congratulations to Javier!At the tender age of 9, Javier Fernandez-Han found his calling: design for the other 90 percent - help the world's poor meet their basic needs sustainably.Several years of research and design have led to an innovative solution: The VERSATILE System - a mashup of new and adapted technology that treats waste, produces methane and bio-oil as fuel, produces food for humans and livestock, sequesters greenhouse gases, and produces oxygen.What drives this complete energy resource system? Algae - the little organism that could.For his work, Javier, 15, won the top prize in this year's Invent Your World Challenge, sponsored by Ashoka's Youth Venture and the Lemelson Foundation.We spoke to Javier about the VERSATILE System and the need for holistic thinking in the invention sector.

Posted by ewilhelm 9 years ago


Why Vegan Is Good?

Here are four reasons that make me cook and eat vegan, and most important – enjoy it: Vegan is Healthy - Eating vegan and fresh food several times per week will make you lose weight, look better, be full of energy and feel better. Go back to the roots. Vegan is more Sustainable - Conventional livestock farming is the most polluting, water using, greenhouse gases emitting and cruel industry humans have ever managed to create. And don’t give me that crap about pesticides and migrant workers picking the vegetables – buy seasonal (see recipes for autumn-winter, spring-summer or all season meals) and local products. It’s your choice who you’re giving your money to after all! Vegan brings Cultures together - Vegan meals are dominant menu in all ancient cultures – from India and the Middle East, through South East Asia, the Americas, Europe and Africa. Vegan is a Challenge - My first rule – never follow a recipe to the letter. Use your imagination and creativity, change it according to your personal taste, improvise and share your experience. And here I am putting together a cookbook with easy vegan recipes and willing to share experience! 

Posted by DiaPia 7 years ago


(newsletter) Bamboo Bike, Pacman Furniture, Beef Jerky...

Sign-up for this newsletter: September 24, 2009 Welcome back! Digital Days Photo Contest - Show us your best photo trick, tip, or homemade gadget to win a new Sony digital camera! VOTE NOW: Converse Back to School in Style Contest - Vote for your favorites! Coming soon: Arduino Contest and our most awesome Halloween Contest ever! Any Instructable published since the last Halloween contest is eligible! Want a more convenient version of Instructables with fewer ads? Get a Pro Membership! Print on Fabric with Citra-Solv Build a Greenhouse with Scrap Materials Make a Great Book Safe Bamboo Bike Frame Cup & Pot from Aluminum Bottles Brownie Recipe Bike Tire and Gear Belt Steampunk Mechanical Monocle Pickled Eggs Solar iPhone Charger for <$50 Beef Jerky Carry any Bottle with a Jug Knot Handle Vote for your favorites! Win a digital camera! Wooden Engagement Ring Mini Joystick with Fire Button Smell Graffiti Pacman Cushion Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric Instructables.com - 82 2nd St. - San Francisco, CA Sign-up for this newsletter:

Posted by fungus amungus 9 years ago


$25 Million for Capturing Carbon

Gore and Branson have teamed up to sponsor an X-prize-like competition for capturing carbon dioxide. I love these types of competitions. Is anyone here on Instructables in a position to enter? With a bit of industry-sponsorship, this would make for a series of fantastic Ph.D projects. From: http://www.nature.com/news/2007/070205/full/070205-16.htmlA multi-million dollar prize is on offer to anyone who can invent a device that will remove significant amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. As one of the largest science prizes on offer, it is likely to attract huge interest globally in a bid to combat climate change.The initiative was launched today by British billionaire entrepreneur Richard Branson and former US Vice-President Al Gore in London.The US$25 million "Virgin Earth Challenge" Prize can be claimed for any invention that will remove "significant" amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere - perhaps in the order of a billion tonnes a year. Current global emissions are more than 7 billion tonnes per year."The winner must be able to demonstrate a commercially viable design which will result in the net removal of anthropogenic, atmospheric, greenhouse gases each year for at least ten years without countervailing harmful effects," state the written rules of the competition. It must "contribute materially to the stability of the Earth's climate".The winning entry could be anything from manufacturing bacteria to install in industrial emissions pipes, to creating a system that buries CO2 underground, or even inventing artificial trees to breathe in the gas from the air.

Posted by ewilhelm 11 years ago


What New Useful Products Have You Recently Become Acquainted With ?

Here is My list. I recently saw an ible about sugru. Had neverheard of it, before  but can see its usefulness. Kind of expensive and not generally available. Have seen polymer clays, but cant see how it would replace epoxy putty Available at craft shops. Have heard Rescue tape ( fusible silicon ) . I haven't had a use for it, but it seems to be a great repair tape. It was available at Craftwood  Lumber, so it is a mass market product. Expensive, but can see it's potential worth. I'll wait til. I need it before I buy it. The oscillating tools have come down in price. Not exactly new, but extremely useful especially for people whose shop is their desk or kitchen table. If I were to have one power tool, it probably would still be the cordless drill driver. But if I were allowed a second power tool, this would be it. Blades are expensive.  Demolition Bags are very useful and cheap and generally available. I recently saw a device for bending PVC pipe. I have avoided using PVC because of the joints. I prefer thin metal conduit because it can be bent with the pipe bender I was able to acquire. That being said, the Pipe Viper may  be worthwhile. I am considering a small greenhouse made of arched PVV pipe and clear sheeting.  

Posted by Wilmette 5 years ago


"Your Environmentalism Sucks!" Says WIRED

The cover story of WIRED this month has been published online and you can read their 10 "heresies" about the environment. They're clearly trying to shake things up by telling people stuff that sounds so wrong, but is obviously right according to them.The gist of WIRED's philosophy is that it's all about the carbon dioxide emissions and that every discussion should be framed entirely by this. After that setup, each article is a quick hit against some supposedly sacred cow.The full list of articles is below and here's a response from ecogeek that continues the discussion. So what do you think?Live in Cities: Urban Living Is Kinder to the Planet Than the Suburban LifestyleA/C Is OK: Air-Conditioning Actually Emits Less C02 Than HeatingOrganics Are Not the Answer: Surprise! Conventional Agriculture Can Be Easier on the PlanetFarm the Forests: Old-Growth Forests Can Actually Contribute to Global WarmingChina Is the Solution: The People's Republic Leads the Way in Alternative-Energy HardwareAccept Genetic Engineering: Superefficient Frankencrops Could Put a Real Dent in Greenhouse Gas EmissionsCarbon Trading Doesn't Work: Carbon Credits Were a Great Idea, But the Benefits Are IllusoryEmbrace Nuclear Power: Face It. Nukes Are the Most Climate-Friendly Industrial-Scale Form of EnergyUsed Cars - Not Hybrids: Don't Buy That New Prius! Test-Drive a Used Car InsteadPrepare for the Worst: Climate Change Is Inevitable. Get Used to ItCounterpoint: Dangers of Focusing Solely on Climate Change

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Paper Bags Are Better Than Plastic, Right?

Paper Bags Are Better Than Plastic, Right? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Summary: The answer to the "paper or plastic?" dilemma is: Neither. They're roughly equal in pros and cons. While convenient addictions, they both gobble up natural resources and cause significant pollution. Get basic design benefits of a paper bag and plastic bag with our award-winning replacements - the ACME Bags Workhorse (the plastic bag replacement) and the EarthTote (the paper bag replacement). Same brilliant basic design as their wasteful relatives, but designed to be used thousands of times. __________________ Issue 1: Energy and natural resources It takes more than four times as much energy to manufacture a paper bag as it does to manufacture a plastic bag. ENERGY TO PRODUCE BAG ORIGINALLY (BTUs) Safeway Plastic Bags: 594 BTUs Safeway Paper Bags: 2511 BTUs (Source: 1989 Plastic Recycling Directory, Society of Plastics Industry.) Of course, most paper comes from tree pulp, so the impact of paper bag production on forests is enormous. In 1999, 14 million trees were cut to produce the 10 billion paper grocery bags used by Americans that year alone. Paper bag production delivers a global warming double-whammy forests (major absorbers of greenhouse gases) have to be cut down, and then the subsequent manufacturing of bags produces greenhouse gases. Issue 2: Pollution The majority of kraft paper is made by heating wood chips under pressure at high temperatures in a chemical solution. As evidenced by the unmistakable stench commonly associated with paper mills, the use of these toxic chemicals contributes to both air pollution, such as acid rain, and water pollution. Millions of gallons of these chemicals pour into our waterways each year; the toxicity of the chemicals is long-term and settles into the sediments, working its way through the food chain. Further toxicity is generated as both plastic and paper bags degrade. POLLUTANTS PAPER V.S. PLASTIC Paper sacks generate 70% more air and 50 times more water pollutants than plastic bags. Source: "Comparison of the Effects on the Environment of Polyethylene and Paper Carrier Bags," Federal Office of the Environment, August 1988 Issue 3: Recycling It takes 91% less energy to recycle a pound of plastic than it takes to recycle a pound of paper. But recycling rates of either type of disposable bag are extremely low, with only 10 to 15% of paper bags and 1 to 3% of plastic bags being recycled, according to the Wall Street Journal. ENERGY TO RECYCLE PACKAGE ONCE (BTUs) Safeway Plastic Bags: 17 BTUs Safeway Paper Bags: 1444 BTUs Source: 1989 Plastic Recycling Directory, Society of Plastics Industry. Although paper bags have a higher recycling rate than plastic, each new paper grocery bag you use is made from mostly virgin pulp for better strength and elasticity. Issue 4: Degradability Current research demonstrates that paper in today's landfills does not degrade or break down at a substantially faster rate than plastic does. In fact, nothing completely degrades in modern landfills because of the lack of water, light, oxygen and other important elements that are necessary for the degradation process to be completed. A paper bags takes up more space than a plastic bag in a landfill, but because paper is recycled at a higher rate, saving space in landfills is less of an issue. Do you have any conclusion on paper bag or plastic bag?

Posted by paperbag4u 8 years ago


(newsletter) Kilo-Lumen Bike Light, Sparkleball, Amazing Pumpkin Pie...

Nov 26, 2008 Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); } Welcome back! Making something sweet for the holidays? Then enter it in the Holiday Treats Contest and win a custom laser-etched rolling pin! Show us your best creation powered by AA, AAA, C, or D batteries and win a full set of eneloop rechargeable batteries in the SANYO eneloop Battery Powered Contest! Color a robot and send it in to help us decorate Eric's office!Coming very soon... our biggest contest yet! Any project using tools will be eligible, so start tinkering now! (no-melt) Sparkleball by sparkleball_lady Perfect Oven Sweet Potato Fries by jessyratfink Cook a Huge Dinner w/ Spreadsheets by canida Kilo-Lumen bike headlight by kc6qhp Win a sweet set of rechargeable batteries! Win a custom laser-engravedrolling pin! Homemade Flavored Marshmallows by cainunable Build a Greenhouse for under $25 by PondPlantGirl Turn a Photo into a Stencil! by Weissensteinburg Amazingly Smooth Pumpkin Pie by ewilhelm "Dead" Battery Lamp by zjharva Arduino Controlled Servo Robot by Stuart.Mcfarlan Modular Pie-cosahedron by turkey tek Bicycle Oil Lantern by alpacalypse Make a gift special with these customizable Instructables Vote for your favorites! How to make Soft Drinks by SFHandyman Bench Saw Table for a Wood Lathe by Phil B Cranberry Relish by LasVegas Hard Drive Persistence of Vision by vishnubob Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup2","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); }

Posted by fungus amungus 9 years ago


(newsletter) Cheap Screenprinting, Bike Boombox, Pi Day...

Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); } We're now running THREE awesome contests, so get to work on your Instructables! Burning Questions is back with a vengeance. Answer our questions and win the love of thousands, or at least a spiffy new t-shirt! ThinkGeek Hacks Contest is now open for those of you who enjoy modifying the things you buy. Hack or modify anything from ThinkGeek and win a $250 gift certificate!Epilog Challenge is still open for entries. Enter your project with a green twist for a chance to win an Epilog Zing laser cutter or a gift certificate from Ponoko!Klutz Rubber Band-Powered Contest is almost open for your rubber band-powered contraptions! Win cool books from Klutz! Pi Day Guide Screenprint for Less Than $10 Make a Soil Blocker Build a Music Studio in an Apartment Win a laser cutter! Stretch, twist, and power something cool! (almost open) Build a Bike Boom Box Steampunk Clockwork Piston Turn a 300 Watt Lamp into a 20 Watt CFL Reconstructive Surgery for a Suitcase Get a free Expo Pass or save 35% on Conference registrations for Web 2.0 Expo San Francisco! Featured questions from our new Answers section: How do I build an audio amplifier circuit?Is there an affordable way to wireless stream audio from my laptop to my speakers? Oobleck: Gooey Science Experiment Build an Inexpensive Ikea NAS Make an Automatic Plant Light Spraygun 101 Let your geekiness shine! Get your green ready! Master a Perfect Inline Wire Splice Greenhouse From Old Windows Optical Illusion - Mysterious Black Dots Three Part Clock Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); }

Posted by fungus amungus 9 years ago


I need an idea of what could be made from two curved glass deli cabinet doors.

Along with a few flat glass shelves, I was given two large curved glass deli cabinet doors as shown in the image below. They still have the aluminum bars attached to the long ends. One the top side that was formerly attached to a hinge mechanism and one being the lower side that formerly held a rubber seal. I only have the doors, as the rest of the cabinet was used for another purpose or recycled by the previous owners. I'm trying to come up with a project to repurpose them for, but I'm drawing a blank. They are about 4 feet long and 2 feet wide with no cracks.  They appear to be tempered glass and are very heavy. Here are some ideas: -  large vertical display cabinets made from wood with the glass doors on the front of them might work by using the short ends as the top and bottom. - large horizontal display cases made from wood with the glass doors as the top or front and access to the rear. - Some sort of greenhouse window. - I eventually would like to build a house out of shipping containers. Incorporating these into the plans as windows would be cool as long as I can figure out how to frame them out to give a good seal. perhaps as a skylight? (Of course, not being double paned, they wouldn't have much of an R-value). - Something artistic that can utilize the glass panes and be hung on a wall or used as a display. I have access to a Hackerspace in St. Louis, Missouri with plenty of tools and other raw materials. The pieces are so large that I'd have to work on the project and clean up each day rather than leave the project out. It's a shared space, so I don't want my stuff to be in the way of others. Any input from the Instructables community would be helpful.

Posted by GeekTinker 2 years ago


Hands-on Weekend Algaculture Workshop

October 18-19, 2008@ The Algae Lab in Berkeley, CAalgaelab.org: a component of The Shipyard / All Power LabsIt's a fact. Food, fuel, fertilizer, fresh water, and arable land --all are running out. But there is a crop that can grow in salt water,on true waste land, creating all the products we need by eatinggreenhouse gases and water water. And can grow 100x faster thanconventional crops. Algae! A truly green crop for a sustainablefuture.We are the Shipyard algae lab community. We have created the world'sfirst community algae lab -- for development of open source,DIY-oriented algae technology, to facilitate the co-operative pursuitof this new form of agriculture -- and we invite *you* to come learnhow to raise algae and transform them into exciting products!Whether you are looking for a job in the exploding algae biofuelsfield, or thinking about creating your own farm, we can help you getup to speed! We have created an independent, non-profit algaelaboratory for teaching and research using low-cost, widely-availablematerials, and we qould love to teach you how! Get on board with thisexciting, expanding field that's truly "green"!Over the course of the weekend we will teach you:The current state of algae farming technology, and where it's headed,What algae are interesting, and for what purposes,How to obtain algae strains,How to figure out the right nutrients for your algae,How to design and build effective ponds and bio-reactors,How to "grow out" your algae into a full-sized pond or bio-reactor,How to monitor the health of your algae, andHow to harvest your algae and make them into food, fuel, and fertilizer!All levels of experience and expertise are welcome. Graduates areeligible to become members of our lab and to use its facilities.October 18 & 19th, 11am - 6pm1010 Murray St, Berkeley, CA 94710$150 per participantmore info: [www.algaelab.org algaelab.org]contact: workshop@algaelab.org

Posted by noahw 10 years ago


Instructables, Popular Science, and TreeHugger "Go Green!" Contest Results

Instructables, Popular Science, and [http://www.treehugger Treehugger] are pleased to announce the winners of the Go Green contest!The entries were fantastic- check the full list of projects as well as the winners for more great ways to green your life.Grand PrizeThe grand prize winner will receive a Breezer Liberty hybrid commuter bicycle with pedal-powered lights, an Instructables robot t-shirt, a brief write-up in a future issue of Popular Science, and a 1-year subscription to Popular Science magazine.Hydroponic Bog Garden (Water Recycling) by BiotankFirst PrizeEach first prize winner will receive a Solio Universal Hybrid Solar Charger (TreeHugger review here), an Instructables robot t-shirt, and a 1-year subscription to Popular Science magazine.Bicyle Power for Your Television by bdwhaleyGeodesic Dome Greenhouse by yes2techHow to MAKE PV Solar Panels by VIRONPortable 12V Air Conditioner --Cheap and easy! by CameronSSSolar Thermal Water Heater For Less Than Five Dollars by TheNaibSecond PrizeEach second prize winner will receive an Instructables robot t-shirt and a 1-year subscription to Popular Science Magazine.Build your own flat panel solar thermal collector by iwilltryCart Bike by zieakComposter (Drum Style) by jdlinkFree Air Conditioning by VygerGrow organic food without spending $ by gowithfloHack a Toilet for free water by gregorylavoieHow to save water in gardens and small-holdings: the Scrooge Bottle by KitemanMake an Evaporative Terra Cotta Beer Chiller by jolshefskyRecreate a Vanishing Ecosystem : The Eastern Vernal Pool by Tool Using AnimalThe Wind-up Headboard Reading Light by peterwbrownAll winners should watch their inboxes for a private message with prize-claim instructions.Thanks to our judges, who carefully read through all 63 eligible entries:arwen; canida; Dave Prochnow, PopSci; Doug Cantor, PopSci; ewilhelm; fungus amungus; Graham Hill, TreeHugger; John Mahoney, PopSci; Ken Rother, TreeHugger; Mike Haney, PopSci; noahw; numberandom; reno_dakota; seedlingproject; Shayne McQuaid, TreeHugger; stasterisk; T3h_Muffinator; TetranitrateFor more information on how we judged, click here for the full results.

Posted by canida 11 years ago


Grow a plant in my locker?

Currently, this is an idea, and i am simply expanding on it. I had this great idea, mostly as a joke, why not grow a plant in a spare locker? I am currently a high school student that goes to a small school, and have way too much time on my hands. As i was looking at the empty lockers we have from students who left, or even just spares, an idea hit me. Why not put one of these lockers to good use? Why not put a plant inside of it, that can sustain most if not all of itself? Have a gallon of water in there, along with an arduino and a moisture sensor, that would end up watering the plant. I would also have an artificial light source to provide light, preferably LED. The hardest bit is the power. All of this would run off of either a SLA battery or two, or maybe a drill battery. I could swap the battery once every day, which means it would need to go for 24 hours without stopping. That, and the weekends, which would be three full days. I first thought about mushrooms, or other dark growing plants, but i find that boring, lacking a challenge. besides doing this just for jokes, i have also wanted to try out the idea of growing a plant fully indoors without the use of natural sunlight. I have never done this, so please feel free to bombard me with recommendations. Again, this is only an idea. I can only assume it's possible. Also, recommendations on parts and methods would be sweet. Some type of light that can be powered on 12-24v, and run off of a SLA or maybe even a lawnmower battery for minimum of 3 days. Also, plant. I was thinking a tomato plant? Some species that doesn't grow taller than 2.5ft? Anyway, that's the idea. If you guys could help with ideas, provide recommendations, or point me in the correct direction, that'd be sweet. Last note, i would like to keep this cheap. I am not going for some extreme garden or anything. Just a single plant, in a semi-self sustaining locker.

Posted by RocketPenguin 3 years ago


Cabins/shelter from garbage/recycling and then some- new site/blog- and INDIE BOOK released

D.I.Y. Micro-Shelters: NEW indie book-forum/site- w/cabins from garbage/recycling and then some I figured it was about time to get up off my arse and get an actual account here, as on a few other sites I constantly(!) read. I'll also post a few of the "constructed-from-roadside-trash" cabins I've built soon- here and on my own blog/site (if anyone's interested, if not, I'll resume beer drinking, and general relaxation). I'm also in the process of building a 16 square foot multi-purpose, mobile cabin-sleeper/sauna/greenhouse/ice-fishing shanty that I'll eventually post upon (its one of three cabins in the works in my Sanford N' Son-like backyard)- yeah, my wife is a trooper! http://www.relaxshax.com http://www.relaxshacks.com In the meantime, after WELL over a year of illustrating and writing, I've now finally completed (through tiny yellow house press) my own small houses/cabins book "Humble Homes, Simple Shacks, Cozy Cottages, Ramshackle Retreats, Funky Forts- And Whatever The Heck Else We Could Squeeze In Here." Clockin' in, coffee-table-book size, at just over 100 pages filled with avalanches of sketches and redneck-thrift/yankee ingenuity projects and ideas, I'm now selling a small initial run of these hand assembled books (you can find all the details on the blog/post). Building your own windows, doors, solar showers, rainbarrels, bridges, furniture, and more from recycled crud, is all covered within. Inspirationally, the books owes good parts of its existence to the work of Lester Walker, David and Jeanie Stiles, D.C. Beard, Dan Price, and Lloyd Kahn. All in all, I'm a small-house book junky, and after the well started drying up a little (I've bought and read all the decent ones I could find) I decided to write my own. Anyway, thanks for looking, and I'll get some small house photos up soon! Happy belated new years to all! -Derek "Deek" Diedricksen

Posted by Deek D 8 years ago


Global Warming - Ruling on Documentary

UK Broadcasting watchdog OfCom has ruled that the Channel 4 documentary The Great Global Warming Swindle broke broadcasting rules by implying that GW was not due to human activity.The film's key contentions were that the increase in atmospheric temperatures observed since the 1970s was not primarily caused by emissions of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, and that the modern focus on climate change is based in politics rather than science. It is seen in some "climate sceptic" circles as a counter to Al Gore's movie An Inconvenient Truth, and credited with influencing public perception of climate science. It has reportedly been sold to 21 countries and distributed on DVD. GW experts featured in the documentary complained that they were quoted out of context, had not been told of the aims of the programme makers, and some quotes attributed to experts were, allegedly, made up by the reporters."It's very disappointing that Ofcom hasn't come up with a stronger statement about being misled," said Sir John Houghton, a former head of the UK Met Office and chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) scientific assessment. "I know hundreds of people, literally hundreds, who were misled by it - they saw it, it was a well-produced programme and they imagined it had some truth behind it, so they were misled and it seems Ofcom didn't care about that," he told BBC News."The programme has been let off the hook on a highly questionable technicality," said Bob Ward, former head of media at the Royal Society, who played a prominent role in co-ordinating objections to the film. "The ruling noted that Channel 4 had admitted errors in the graphs and data used in the programme, yet decided that this did not cause harm or offence to the audience." Plaintiffs accused the programme of containing myriad factual inaccuracies, but Ofcom says it was "impractical and inappropriate for it to examine in detail all of the multifarious alleged examples... set out in the complaints." On another issue - whether contributors to the programme had been treated fairly - Ofcom mainly found against Channel 4 and the film's producer WagTV. Former UK chief scientific adviser Sir David King had been misquoted and had not been given a chance to put his case, the regulator said. Ofcom also found in favour of Carl Wunsch, an oceanographer interviewed for the programme, who said he had been invited to take part in a programme that would "discuss in a balanced way the complicated elements of understanding of climate change", but which turned out to be "an out-and-out propaganda piece, in which there is not even a gesture toward balance". The film alleged that the IPCC's scientific reports were driven by politics rather than science, and Ofcom ruled the organisation had not been given adequate time to respond. Full BBC article, plus links

Posted by Kiteman 10 years ago


Energy return on investment for various different energy sources

We're used to thinking about the cost per unit of energy (e.g. $/gallon of gasoline) with the implicit assumption that cost is a rough indicator of what is required to obtain that energy. The Oil Drum has a nice piece on Energy Return on Investment (EROI) and the implications of using low EROI energy sources. To dive right in, it's instructive to think about the EROI of domestic oil production as a function of time:100:1 in 193030:1 in 197011-18:1 in 2000EROI on the Web part 2 of 5, (Provisional Results Summary, Imported Oil, Natural Gas)Energy return on investment, sometimes called EROI and sometimes called EROEI, is thought by many, including myself, to be a critical issue for determining the past, present and future status of human society. It is usually considered in terms of energy return on energy investment, but it can also be considered in terms of energy return on monetary investment. While much of human progress has been attributed, rightfully, to technology, much of that technology has been a means of using more energy for human ends. This is true for fire, knife blades and spear points (energy concentrating devices), the development of agriculture and the increase in its productivity and, essentially all aspects of the industrial revolution.EROI is simply the energy delivered by an energy-obtaining activity compared to the energy required to get it. If the numerator and denominator are expressed in the same units (barrels per barrel, MegaJoules per MegaJoule) the result is a dimensionless ratio, i.e. 100:1 or 10:1). Obviously a higher ratio implies a more desirable fuel than a lower one, other things being equal (which is rarely the case). The concept is extremely simple in theory but often very difficult in execution, mostly because society generally maintains its records in monetary rather than energy terms. Another problem is that the U.S. Government has not supported such studies in a consistent fashion and it is my perception that the quality of some energy records as are kept by e.g. the U.S. Departments of Energy and of Commerce appear to be deteriorating in recent years. Thus deriving the energy cost of getting energy (or most other things) is generally somewhat, and oftentimes exceedingly, difficult. A second problem is that the usual measure of the quantity of a fuel, its heat value, often does not give a full assessment of that fuel's ability to do economic or other work. Most simply electricity and thermal heat from e.g. coal or oil have a great difference in their ability to do work, such as we are willing to trade three or four heat units of coal or oil in a thermal plant for one thermal unit of higher quality electricity. Thus if the input and output fuels are of different quality then it is often thought desirable to weight in some way the inputs and the outputs. A third problem is that it is important to consider boundaries: how large should we draw the boundaries of the energy analysis for the inputs? We will consider these issues in far more detail in later publications but there are many reasons why it is important to make summaries of EROI available at this time even though many uncertainties exist in the numbers that we present here, and indeed with any numbers that might be possible to generate.via jforbess

Posted by ewilhelm 10 years ago


[newsletter] Ultrasonic Batgoggles, Miracle Fruit, Giant Lite Brite...

Sign-up for our newsletter here. May 29, 2008 Welcome back! Have a cool signature for your user name? Share it with the community at this signature collection post. Lots of people have been ordering shirts from our new store. The free shipping only lasts through tomorrow so order now!Want to win some magnetic photo rope to display your pictures? Enter our caption contest!Coming soon... a new contest based on travel tips. Check out these cool Instructables! Go Online without Getting Snooped: Tor (The Onion Router) Want to get online on a network that likes to snoop? Try using TOR. posted by w1n5t0n on May 27, 2008 Ultrasonic Batgoggles Experience echolocation and learn to "see" with your ears. posted by suneth on May 27, 2008 Cheap, easy, low-waste platform bed Build a queen size platform bed with storage space underneath for less than $30, in about an hour, and learn some basic carpentry skills in the process. posted by aeray on May 19, 2008 Make a $5.00 "Space Pen" for your wallet Put handy space pen in your wallet so that you can write upside down whenever you want. posted by doctor_wu on May 25, 2008 How to Build a Hank Drum Build your own unique drum from a propane tank with just a few basic tools. posted by Hermes on May 20, 2008 Make you own wearable arc reactor and be cooler than Tony Stark! Want your own arc reactor like the one in Iron Man? Here's how to do it. posted by mspark400 on May 26, 2008 Giant Lite Brite The original Lite Brite was cool, but a 4' x 4' version is better and allows for multiple kids of all ages to play at once! posted by noahw on May 22, 2008 Make Biodiesel! The biodiesel story continues with the method of making the biodiesel itself. posted by drinkmorecoffee on May 22, 2008 Win amazing LED POV kits! Closes for entries on Sunday! Green Science Fair! Lightbulb "green"house The humble light bulb may be on its way out, but instead of trashing them you can give them new lives as tiny greenhouses. posted by LinuxH4x0r on May 26, 2008 Growing Your Own Miracle Fruit A guide to help anyone willing to grow the exotic and highly rewarding Miracle Fruit. posted by Putzer on Jun 27, 2007 Shoot the Rainbow: Skittles Vodka Loved Skittles as a kid and want to enjoy the flavors in a new way now that you're an adult? Skittles vodka may be just the thing for you. posted by applesticker on May 27, 2008 Dell Laptop into Digital Photo Frame That outdated laptop may be too slow for your new applications, but it can still serve as a sweet photo frame. posted by vorin on May 24, 2008 Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Amazon.com&reg; and Instructables Science Fair Results!

Amazon.com® and Instructables are pleased to announce the winners of the Science Fair! The entries were sweet, and I personally learned quite a few new things. Check out all the projects here.Grand PrizeThe grand prize winner for will receive a USD $1,500 Amazon.com gift certificate, a custom laser-etched Leatherman Juice S2 multi-tool, and an Instructables Robot t-shirt.The Rubens' Tube: Soundwaves in Fire! by yourtvliesFirst PrizeEach first prize winner will each receive a USD $250 Amazon.com gift certificate, a custom laser-etched Leatherman Juice S2 multi-tool, and an Instructables Robot t-shirt.Build an antique style crystal radio by OhmWiimote Rubens Tube: Control Fire With Sound! (And a Nintendo Wiimote!) by ScaryBunnyManKitchen laboratory II: The CO2 trap by syribiaThe Hilsch vortex tube by thecheatscalcRunners UpThe runners-up will each receive a USD $25 Amazon.com gift certificate, an Instructables patch, and stickers.A simple mechanical resonance demonstrator by 5VoltHow to make plastic by aaPreparing your own thin layer chromatography plates (and then using them) by allanf0Make a Voltage Controlled Resistor and Use It by BioteleElectromechanical Transducer Out of a Polystyrene Conical Section! by BookburnMake Potato Plastic! by Brandon121233The Bio-Battery - Power for the future. (So easy a 10 year old can do it.) by chowdeshellMotor Speaker by guyfrom7upHow to make air muscles! by HonusMeasure the drag coefficient of your car by iwilltryBarbie Doll Electric Chair Science Fair Project! by jessyratfinkMake an Evaporative Terra Cotta Beer Chiller by jolshefskyBe a scientist: make your own force meter. by Kiteman8X10 foldable pinhole camera by lennybBuilding a better Guinea and Feather by Luke LuckGrowing Mushrooms: PF Tek by nakKelvin's Thunderstorm - Create lightning from water and gravity! by NK5Be a Scientist: Learn about Triboluminescence (or Lightning in your by RedNeckOreoLet's go green! Build a Solar Powered Parabolic Cooker! by WeissensteinburgGeodesic Dome Greenhouse by yes2techFamily CollaborationThese collaborating families will receive a matched set of Instructables Robot t-shirts and an acrylic Robot plaque laser-engraved with their names!The Bio-Battery - Power for the future. (So easy a 10 year old can do it.) by chowdeshellLaunch it: the Huffin' Hoopster by KitemanAll winners should watch their inboxes for a private message with prize-claim instructions.The following Instructables were rated high enough to be runners-up, but the authors already had a winning entry:Hack The Spy Ear and Learn to Reverse Engineer a Circuit by BioteleBuild a solar hot dog cooker by iwilltryMeasure the specific heat of water and other fluids by iwilltryBe a Scientist: map your skin by KitemanThe Chaos Machine (Double Pendulum) by Luke LuckKitchen laboratory: Proteins and Cheese making by syribiaMake Rheopectic slime in less than 15 minutes! (It is not Oobleck) by syribiaGive a big round of applause to our awesome judges who spent hours going through each project:Bill Burkland, CameronSS, canida, dan, dave spencer, ewilhelm, fungus amungus, jeffkobi, KaptinScarlet, lebowski, noahw, Peanut, turkey tek, viron, and zieak.From complete voting results, go here.Amazon, Amazon.com and the Amazon.com logo are registered trademarks of Amazon.com Inc. or its affiliates.

Posted by ewilhelm 11 years ago


Homemade Gift Contest Winners

Congratulations to everyone who entered the Homemade Gifts contest! Thanks to your efforts, the Christmas-Industrial complex was dealt a heavy blow this holiday season. I've gotten lots of future gifting ideas from these projects, and hope you have too. This year we gave all our cousins awesome laser-engraved water bottles (to practice for the third prizes!), but didn't get our act together in time to make gifts for the entire family. Next year we'll try to move even farther off the consumerist grid. Start thinking now, and you'll be ready for both the holidays and next year's gift contest!Check it out:First PrizeThese three projects win one of these tools: a Cuisinart 7c food processor, a Dremel 400-6/90 400 Series XPR Rotary Tool Kit, a Fluke 115 True-RMS Multimeter, or a Singer 1525 sewing machine.Give the gift of Robot Invasion by MrMunkiHard drive platter clock by albetchaMagnetic Rubik's Dice Cube by burzvingionSecond PrizeThese five projects win a Leatherman juice S2 pocket knives laser-engraved with the Instructables logo and the author's name.freehand glass etching by RobyntheslugLiterary Clock by mdhaworthJunk box flowers by photozzHome-made Sun Jar by cre8torTechnical Monster by redribboncrowSecond Prize prime!These five projects win handy Make Magazine Thomas J. Glover Pocket References Guides.The Persistence of Recorded Memory by fungus amungusPersonalized Guess Who by randofoWooden Candle Holder by samWall mounted magnetic knife block by radiorentalUSB powered LED christmas tree by T3h_MuffinatorThird PrizeThese 10 projects win the choice of a water bottle or a flashlight laser-engraved with the Instructables logo and the author's name.Countertop Greenhouse by whamodyneA Box Kite! (that's almost bigger than my wife!) by marcward86Photograph to Stencil by nakNixie Tube Ornament by ianContinuity Tester by neelandanUSB controlled mini lava lamps by jameshLED Floaties by TetranitratePC remote control by ZujusResistor Man by chrCustom Mirror by iammatouHonorable mentionThese 15 projects win an Instructables patch.boy crush mash-up T by liloBlanket With Built-In Hood by trialexKat Litter Cake -- Gifts Impossible to Re-Gift by trebuchet03Pocket Tripod by theRIAATeddy Bear Speaker by constructer of the oddHow to make a nice wooden sword by BobbyMikeTrendy note card gift set by outofthewoodsDisk Drive Dollar Bank by FrenchCrawlerJewelry or Serviette holder by puffin_juiceLucky Charms iPod Nano Gift Box by luckymonkeygarageGift Home made high power air BB gun for Christmas! by african_andy187How to bind a book by eleraamaPinball Coffee Table by heyrockerCustomizable Fleece Hats by ryzellonXylophone windchime from a children's toy by zieakThere were scores of fantastic projects, which made the judging quite difficult. (This is the best kind of problem to have, of course- keep up the great work!) Thankfully our judges were up to the challenge. Please give a round of virtual applause to judges jess, ian, LasVegas, rbhays, lisarea, GregDDC, Tool Using Animal, trebuchet03, randofo, jeffreyf, beemer, HeresyOfTruth, FrenchCrawler, turkey tek, zieak, mever, vatosupreme, ewilhelm, DavidBrown, numberandom, and fungus amungus. Judges weren't allowed to vote for their own projects.Since we only give one prize per person, these fine entries (which would otherwise have won prizes) don't appear above:Wine Bags by mdhaworthHand crank lego usb charger by Tetranitrate Frankenbear Synthamajig by randofoTelephone Handset Microphone by randofoWe'll contact the winners shortly via personal message with prize-claiming instructions.For circular linking, here are the original contest instructions.

Posted by canida 11 years ago


2007 High Country tour of sustainable Living

Hi all. So here I am on fall break. Two days of not going to classes. I decided to tell ya'll (I'm in the south, I'm allowed to say that) about this weekend.This weekend was a big weekend up here in the mountains, and ASU's Homecoming eclipsed some great stuff, let me tell ya'. Instead of going to the game I decided to go on the 2007 High Country Tour of Sustainable Living. It was amazing! let me fill you in on some of what happened.Friday evening I found out about this and decided I couldn't miss it. So I got up bright and early Saturday morning, put on my robot t-shirt, and headed out. People started arriving around 8 AM and kept coming until 8:45 when we were finishing up breakfast . We all piled onto a biodiesel fueled bus and started for our first destination. I had had my coffee so I was up for talking at 8:45 on a Saturday morning. Right away I met some neat people, and we talked about bio-fuel in general, Who Killed The Electric Car, and the Appropriate technologies department at the university. We pulled up to a farm to be greeted by Ned Trivette and a 65' tall wind turbine, back dropped by the beautiful mountain scenery. Grid-tied and nearly maintenance free, this turbine provides about about 10% of Ned's household power usage.After talking about wind power and how Ned's setup works we loaded up again and headed to the Kennedy residence out in Vilas. We made it as far as the road that turns off to go to their house. There was no way that bus was going to make it up the hill to the house, so we all got out and the few cars that were there started shuttling people up while others of us walked. I walked, and let me tell you, that hill is STEEP. We got to the house without any mishaps and learned about this high efficiency house. It was facing south so it can soak up the sun in the winter months and had deep overhangs to shade the house in the summer months. By far the coolest (pun intended) part of this house was the thermal radiant heating system. Panels on the roof heated the 750 gallon Carolina water stove, and from there the water was pumped throughout the house to the radiant heating system in all the floors. Highly efficient and fascinating. After this we headed off once again. Here's where our schedule got interesting, and everyone was helpfully flexible. We apparently decided to take a "short cut." Someone thought we could make it on this steep dirt road that we took. We did make it, but not before getting stuck a few times and running over a rock. pieces of the bus were falling off and smoke from the tires was going everywhere! Once we finally made it over the hill we didn't have much more trouble. Instead of going to lunch, like we were supposed to do, we went to the ASU Biodiesel research facility. This was the highlight of the tour for me. I learned so much related to my latest endeavor, biodiesel. (for some reason spell check doesn't like that word.) We met Jeremy Ferrell, the guy in charge of all of it. He showed us the process they use to make it, and discussed all the latest research. This facility is amazing! It's completely sustainable. They have solar panels so they're making as much power as they're using, and in their passive solar greenhouse they have a "living machine" to recycle their gray water. There were things (algae and the like) growing everywhere, and the same solar thermal system that we had seen earlier, to heat water. I'm actually going back there sometime in the next few weeks to pick Jeremy's brain about biodiesel "stuff." ASU Collaborative BioDiesel projectAfter this was over and I was dragged back onto the bus we finally went to get some lunch. We were starving.We went to the Hill/Mitchell Residence for lunch. This house was awesome. It was only about 1600 square feet and had a concrete slab between the two floors, to retain heat. They had the radiant heating as well. I didn't get any pictures of the inside of the house but it was at least as cool as the outside. They also had a great garden going. Over lunch we had a speaker who talked about green building, and a lot of what goes into it. (I don't remember his name, sorry!)Our last destination was the Marland residence. It stands up on a hill above the university, in direct sunlight. This house is incredibly energy efficient and quite pleasing to the eye. (it was purple). With very few electric lights in the house that need to be on in the daytime, most of the windows face the sun, with overhangs on the roof for shade in the summer. It also had a tank-less hot water heater, which I had never seen before. It's apparently very energy efficient. So that was this years tour! (or the good parts, at least.) apparently it happens every year, so I plan on going in the future. Let me know if you guys have any questions or comments, in case I got any of the info wrong or left some out. (a lot of this is from memory and the handout we got)Thanks for reading,-DMC

Posted by drinkmorecoffee 11 years ago