How to build a remote controlled humane trap?

I work with a humane society and we have a need to build a remote controlled humane trap so we can trip the trap when the right cat walks in.  It would need to run on batteries and work at a 30 yard distance.  There are a lot of creative types out there and wondered if anyone had an ideas on how to add this device to a trap so it can retract a pin and drop the door.  Any ideas would be appreciated..... Thanks,  Jim

Question by Humane 8 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Collection of books taken to preserve human knowlege

What books file would you take to preserve most of the knowledge of the human race? You have a 64 GB flash drive and durable, waterproof laptop capable of getting power from an hand crank used to view files. What would you put on it? My list: Wikipedia and wikimedia stuff. 10 GB Bible and Collections of various philosophers   Korean, Eastern philosophy and major literature Native American culture and method information Database of major languages, dictionary, and grammar rules Instructables, selected ones Some major works of literature from project Gutenberg Songs from Beatles, Micheal Jackson, Elvis, Queen, ABBA Selected Movies Scientific Data, and other information vital to rebuilding society, such as designs for factories and computer chips.  Pictures of major works of art That's my list, what's yours?

Topic by starwing123 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Video Game Ideas Wanted

A couple of friends and I are planning on making our own Video Game. I thought it would be cool to ask others for ideas. Our game is a mixed genre (we are attempting to put as many game types into one as possible, but still keeping it somewhat reasonable) sci fi game based a couple hundred years into the future. Humans have colonized mars, but their is a war between the two planetary alliances. Meanwhile there is an underground organization that controls everything going on in human society. They prepare for the return of the true martian race who left behind some ancient relics which were discovered and kept a secret. The main character is a super soldier created by the underground society. You unite the human race and fight against the aliens. We have story ideas but would like to hear ideas from other people. All suggestions are welcome. Suggestions could include, but are not limited to: Characters Events Weapons Technology Genre types Plot ideas and twists Side missions One other thing is that we were thinking that the aliens could be human based, and be like a sub-species of humans. Yes or No? Any other ideas are welcome. Thanks to all who help.

Topic by DeviateKarma 5 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Gifts for Cats and Cat Lovers - Valentine's day is Feb 14th

Thought this was timely and participants in the pet forums would appreciate Unique and Imaginative Gifts, Videos, and More for Cats & Their Pet People If you are a cat person or know one, stop by in time for Valentine's day gift ideas or just to see some really cute pictures and a very funny video

Topic by the chipster 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


What do humans *need* to know? (Edited OP)

Without a core set of really basic skills, civilisation is impossible.What do we really, as human beings, need to know in order to maintain a healthy, happy, stable society?I don't mean "how to solder" or "how to change a tyre", but really basic, grass-roots skills.You may be wondering where this question came from, but I was inspired by the Long Now Foundation's concept of future deep-time storage and its Digital Dark-Age Blog.So, let's have your ideas - list skills we need to preserve, in any area of expertise.If you can, provide a reference as well - a link or the name of a book....and maybe we'll inspire a few Instructables as well.Another thing to think about as well - how could we store this information in an enduring, millenia-stable way?I recently voiced my fears to the team involved in The Clock of the Long Now, and they agreed:...I cannot help but think, though, that something is missing.What is missing is hard copy.The Long Viewer and Long Server will only work as long as we are able to maintain power to the computer network that supports them.If humanity loses the ability to generate electricity, these projects will be lost.Even if the loss is short-term, a few years following some global disaster, then there will be a huge loss of information - knowledge and skills will die with those that know them.Those skills - even things as basic as farming and obtaining metals from the raw materials - need to be preserved in a way that will outlast any traditional or foreseeable computer network.It needs to be recorded in a form as unmistakeably monumental as the Pyramids or Stonehenge, but even more durable, and in ways less obscure.Indeed, I picture "the ultimate hard copy" to be henge-like in nature - strong, metres-high slabs of a material such as titanium or a durable glass. Arranged in a spiral or labyrinth pathway, the first slabs will have the most basic skills explained in pictographic forms, images of farming and metalwork, carpentry and building, hunting and weaving, with times of year shown with icons of Sun and Moon.More and more detailed information would be encountered in a variety of languages as people find the need to venture deeper and deeper into the monument.Glassmaking, pottery, medicines, animal husbandry, generating electricity, navigation, brewing and distilling, no skill should be considered too basic to be included, and it would be impossible for a single individual such as myself to even begin to list all the subject areas that would need to be covered, or even to decide what order they should be recorded.What is clear to me, though, is the need for this permanent archive, something that would enable humanity to bring itself back from some unknowable future disaster, at least to the level of being able to preserve and extend life through surgical and chemical techniques, to feed significant populations and to travel and communicate long distances with relative ease and efficiency.It is also clear that there should be more than one of these archives - humans, being only human, could easily go to war to control a single archive, and fate, being fickle, could also ensure that a single archive could be destroyed by whatever catastrophe also reduced humanity to the point of needing its help.RegardsIn reply, they pointed me towards their Digital Dark Age blog, but that is not what I meant - they are talking about saving files. Skills are different, especially the kind of ground-up skills I'm talking about.If I google for "How to Make Iron", what I get are lots of references to "How to make Iron Oxide" and "How to make Iron-on transfers".What I do not get is a clear link to the knowledge I need to be able to turn a pile of brown rocks into metallic iron using only what I can find or make from what I find. Come the comet, though, that's the skill-set I'll need.Amazon is no better at coming up with paper books on the subject.Heretical though it sounds, even this website is not what is needed, simply because it is digital in nature. Come the comet, off goes the power and this entire, wonderful edifice vanishes with the dot on the CRT.Somewhere, somehow, we need to gather these skills into a huge and durable text book. With copies.The questions are, of course, what is stored, where, how, and who pays for it?

Topic by Kiteman 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Tesla Coil Hat

Tyler Christensen, or christensent of MITERS, the MIT Electronic Research Society, took a more high-voltage approach to Halloween this year.  He made this awesome dual resonant solid state tesla coil (DRSSTC) hat! Last year he was responsible for the "Build a Fusion Reactor" Instructable.  This year, his likeness to a mad scientist seems to be increasing!  How long before we see him splice a tesla coil and a human?! More info on his blog: tc-engineering

Topic by T3h_Muffinator 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Scientists say: Hit Them Hard!

It had to happen.Scientists from the University of Ottowa have modelled the effects of a classical zombie plague, as part of a model in epidemiology.They looked at what would happen if uninfected humans attempted to cure or quarantine zombies, and the effects of retaliation:We show that only quick, aggressive attacks can stave off the doomsday scenario: the collapse of society as zombies overtake us all.It looks like we might have a need for all those zombie Instructables after all!PDF of the paper, via BBC story.

Topic by Kiteman 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Free Design Course This October

I thought this looked like something that would appeal to other members of instructables. This coursera course  "Design: Creation of Artifacts in Society" is run by Professor Karl T. Ulrich from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. It is totally free and runs for 8 weeks from Oct 21st 2013: https://www.coursera.org/course/design?utm_classid=971091&utm;_nottype=course.newsession.signup&utm;_notid=1166&utm;_linknum=1 "This is a course aimed at making you a better designer. The course marries theory and practice, as both are valuable in improving design performance. Lectures and readings will lay out the fundamental concepts that underpin design as a human activity. Weekly design challenges test your ability to apply those ideas to solve real problems. The course is deliberately broad - spanning all domains of design, including architecture, graphics, services, apparel, engineered goods, and products"

Topic by yellowcatt 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Energy return on investment for various different energy sources

We're used to thinking about the cost per unit of energy (e.g. $/gallon of gasoline) with the implicit assumption that cost is a rough indicator of what is required to obtain that energy. The Oil Drum has a nice piece on Energy Return on Investment (EROI) and the implications of using low EROI energy sources. To dive right in, it's instructive to think about the EROI of domestic oil production as a function of time:100:1 in 193030:1 in 197011-18:1 in 2000EROI on the Web part 2 of 5, (Provisional Results Summary, Imported Oil, Natural Gas)Energy return on investment, sometimes called EROI and sometimes called EROEI, is thought by many, including myself, to be a critical issue for determining the past, present and future status of human society. It is usually considered in terms of energy return on energy investment, but it can also be considered in terms of energy return on monetary investment. While much of human progress has been attributed, rightfully, to technology, much of that technology has been a means of using more energy for human ends. This is true for fire, knife blades and spear points (energy concentrating devices), the development of agriculture and the increase in its productivity and, essentially all aspects of the industrial revolution.EROI is simply the energy delivered by an energy-obtaining activity compared to the energy required to get it. If the numerator and denominator are expressed in the same units (barrels per barrel, MegaJoules per MegaJoule) the result is a dimensionless ratio, i.e. 100:1 or 10:1). Obviously a higher ratio implies a more desirable fuel than a lower one, other things being equal (which is rarely the case). The concept is extremely simple in theory but often very difficult in execution, mostly because society generally maintains its records in monetary rather than energy terms. Another problem is that the U.S. Government has not supported such studies in a consistent fashion and it is my perception that the quality of some energy records as are kept by e.g. the U.S. Departments of Energy and of Commerce appear to be deteriorating in recent years. Thus deriving the energy cost of getting energy (or most other things) is generally somewhat, and oftentimes exceedingly, difficult. A second problem is that the usual measure of the quantity of a fuel, its heat value, often does not give a full assessment of that fuel's ability to do economic or other work. Most simply electricity and thermal heat from e.g. coal or oil have a great difference in their ability to do work, such as we are willing to trade three or four heat units of coal or oil in a thermal plant for one thermal unit of higher quality electricity. Thus if the input and output fuels are of different quality then it is often thought desirable to weight in some way the inputs and the outputs. A third problem is that it is important to consider boundaries: how large should we draw the boundaries of the energy analysis for the inputs? We will consider these issues in far more detail in later publications but there are many reasons why it is important to make summaries of EROI available at this time even though many uncertainties exist in the numbers that we present here, and indeed with any numbers that might be possible to generate.via jforbess

Topic by ewilhelm 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Extreme Futurist Festival 2012

The END OF THE WORLD at www.extremefuturistfestival.com the VORTEX IMMERSION DOME 450 South Bixel Street, Los Angeles, CA 90017 featuring SURVIVAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES show Extreme Futurist Festival is a 2 day arts and technology festival focusing on radical voices of the new evolution. Last year we had a great event and were called "a TED conference for the counterculture" by the LA Weekly. This year we seek to make XFF an even more epic experience. People are going insane over the Mayan calendar hype about the world ending on 12/21/12. This is why we have decided to bring them the apocalypse they deserve. We are throwing an end-of-the-world conference that you will not forget. Children get in free. We will be focusing on cutting edge science and technology along with transgressive performance art and music. Showcasing the most innovative and subversive memetics of our time, we see to highlight an extreme future that breaks the formula of modern culture. The future has been commodified by the mainstream in an effort to make revolutionary technologies easy to digest. As a result we are now living in an era of complacency, in which the true leaders and game changers are made to feel like outsiders. It is time to rise against the dominant current of our society and declare that nothing is too extreme. We refuse to be assimilated into a carbon copied version of a new humanity. As evolutionary agents we will push the boundaries of what it means to transform our species. XFF is organized by Rachel Haywire, Christopher Jannette, and Sean Humphries.

Topic by devilDroid 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


First project completed...now let's expand it!

My wife is interested in ghost hunting shows like TAPS and Ghost Hunters International. She even joined a local Paranomal Society. The first thing she wanted to buy was an EMF detector for a whopping $175. Now, I don't believe in ghosts, but I support my wife, so instead of buying her an OTS EMF detector, I decided to build her this one. Thanks Computergeek! Oddly, the first thing that popped into my head when I finished building the Arduino EMF detector was a quote from Keano Reeves from Point Break, "I caught my first tube today....Sir." It's appropriate though, in the sense that he was just getting started in the bank robbery investigations. I'm pretty happy with this build...I had a couple of issues in hardware and code that I was able to troubleshoot myself. And it all works! So this was pretty easy, even for a newbie. Now, what I want to do is add a data logger that records values to flash memory. You can probably see where I'm going with this (as a non-believer). If you remove the human element from the situation, is there still paranomal activity? Or put another way, if a tree falls down in the middle of the forest and no one is around to hear it...does it still make noise? If anyone has any ideas, tips, or suggesstions, I'd love to hear them. Thanks for a great online community! LorienD  

Topic by LorienD 7 years ago


Offensive (at least to me) Titles or Content of Instructables

Thank you to the "powers that be" for removing the "Instructable" on how to snare cats that I flagged a few weeks ago. Though my comments were perhaps a bit coarse (considering your Be Nice Policy) watching a video of a snared feline swinging back and forth by the back leg, desperately trying to escape, should shock and anger anyone; cat owner, cat lover or dog owner or anyone else that possesses the tiniest smidgen of humanity. To address the title of this post, I have counted over 60 Instructables that either have "Ghetto" or "Hobo" in their titles or text. I'm not only quite offended by this practice, but find no excuse for allowing it continue; and please note I'm a middle-aged white guy, raised in rural North Dakota and a small city in Minnesota! The first clause of your Be Nice Policy is - "We expect you to respect the rights and dignity of others." Any Instructable that utilizes low-cost, recycled or repurposed materials; or low-tech design and/or assembly methods should proclaim and celebrate those qualities, rather than denigrating or making insinuations about the less fortunate of our society, falls short of meeting the expectations of that clause. I'm fairly positive that you wouldn't publish an Instructable on how to "Jew someone down" (bargain or haggle) to get a lower price, just as I heard expressed by others countless times while I was growing up. It was offensive to my sensibilities then, and even more so now. Thank you for providing the opportunity to address this matter in your forum.

Topic by Hoard-n-Hack 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Rebuilding after the end has come to pass...

The year is 2054, the human race has endured its biggest and longest war ever leaving the last survivors to fend for them selfs in its wake. To make matters worse, a human designed diseasse has spread, thinning out the last survivors to less than 50.000 people all over the world who happen to be lucky enough to be ressistent to the dissease. There are no more governments, no more borders, no forms of modern society ''at all...'' except for your own rules and moral state of mind. Raw modern resources are almost all used up, maybe a few drops of oil here and there but not enough to be reliable for longterm use at all. City's have burn down to the ground, blasted into the sky or have bin left to decay and rust, there are simply not enough people arround to keep them running. U, yes U are one of the lucky ones to wake up one morning, having your loved ones by your side and you can see the sun come up! Your in a forrest, your car has run dry on fuel, but your alive and kicking! What would you do to survive, build a longterm home and grow out to become a safe haven for "all" who will find your place of refugee? These are the conditions you have that work for you: 1. You are not alone, you have the ones that are closest to you with you all the way. ( ideal situation huh? ) 2. The forrest you are in is huge, deu to the fact humankind has declined in such small numbers, nature hase taken back a lot of groundspace and it is booming! ( again, ideal! ) 3. You have a car, it is broken down, has no more fuel except some fumes, but you have it non the less... ( not so ideal, but still... ) 4. In the trunk you have a tiny solar panel, strong enough to fill your cars battery ( yup, one battery... but its 2054 so the poweroutput is more than enough to help you out in the first stages of building your new home. ) 5. In that same trunk you have sleeping gear for camping, a couple of pots and pans, some basic workingtools and a bundle of paracord, couple of hundred feet in length. ( you like paracord, o yes you dooo... ) 6. You see a chicken in the corner of your eye... your running condition happens to be excellent and so you take a sprint... There's your protein... ( eat the chicken, or keep it for later use? its yours now, so do what you want with it. ) This is whats working against you: 1. Guns are not a good option. All rounds off ammo that where ever made have bin used up. Even your trusty ol .45 lays in the back of your trunk not knowing its own purpose in life anymore... ( so sad... ) 2. City's? gone! Piles of rust and decay are the only things that are waiting for you over there. ( pluss, the bandits roaming the city are not the most happy bunch to cross with. ) 3. Fuel, nope, fumes, yes... ( not much going there... ) 4. Communication devices are out... ( you forgot to pack your radio, and now you have nothing to reach out with... or do you? ) 5. The spot your in is most beautifful, really, its the most beautifull patch of forrest you and all around you have ever seen!!! The gigantic mutated bears and stray wolfs think so too... ( Radition and the human designed diseasse worked toghether in the animal kingdom making these guys grow almost double there original size... see statement 1 for double sadness!!! ) Ok, taking the mutated bears and wolves aside, think outside the box. You have a car, thats something, and these bears and wolves will leave you allone as long as you let them do there thing. And if they dont get hungry enough to eat you ofcourse. ( Its a mutual agreement i guess. ) Im curious to see what you guys come up with, so be my guest and spit it out ;-)

Topic by AriedeB 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Religion/Theology Topic (I couldn't think of a good name)

I've had this idea for a couple months now, and I thought I should share it with you guys. I have been interested in science for as long as I can remember (at the expense of my social life), and have always been an atheist. It has always made sense to me, and theism (opposite of atheism, the a is important!) never really has, other than the basic human will to believe in something that keeps order in the universe.But this forum post is not about debating between atheism and theism. Many of us on Instructables excercise our knowledge of the world, and our will to spread it to others. I have partaken in this as well, posting my fill of comments trying to explain why atheism makes sense. But I have recently ceased to do this, and not just because arguing becomes very tiresome, very quickly.Probably the greatest reason why most people believe in a god (or gods) is because it gives them hope; someone to look up to for wisdom and strength in times of need, and a justification for being humble and small in the big wide world. Everyone knows hope is important. I'm not the most hopeful person. Being an atheist does not help this. This is why I have stopped my "atheist trolling". If everyone were like me, spending endless hours of my life just thinking, and coming to conclusions that I should not have come to until I am old. and going insane, and disconnecting from society, the world would not be a very pleasant place. It probably would not be very good if everyone were theists either.I guess I should just say what I've meant to say throughout this whole thing: ignorance is bliss. Many theists are very happy and content with life because of religion. So after this whole post, here is my thesis which I wrote down after going (obviously) off track about halfway through writing this post. God dammit, I need a word limit.I do not bother people about atheism any more because it gives people hope and keeps people sane, which keeps the world in order.

Topic by Aeshir 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Honus- Finalist

Honus is a finalist in the Laser Cutter Challenge for:How to make a Green Lantern ring-including a glowing version!This is a forum post created by Instructables on behalf of the finalist. Help us judge the contest by rating this forum post! Check out all the finalists in the master list or in theLaser Cutter Finalists Group! I just wanted to say a huge thank you to everyone for being considered a finalist- this is a great site with a tremendous amount of knowledge, talent and inspiration for individuals like myself that want to create as well as learn from others. There were so many great entries (350!) in this contest that if you haven't perused the entire group, please do so- there's something for everyone! As for my own entry, after reading through it you may discover that the beauty of learning this mold and pattern making process is that you can then make all sorts of custom resin castings, which makes for some pretty cool projects like custom cases for electronics projects, custom resin cast jewelry or that special part you need to create for your own project. You're only really limited by your imagination!And since people ask "what would YOU do with a laser cutter?" this the proposal I came up with according to the original rules (I had posted this a while back in the forums)-It is important to me as it has to do with how I feel as a community we can have a really positive impact in the world not just by offering our instructables but by directly helping those in need and at the same time promoting ourselves and this site. I think it's a neat idea and while I'm sure there would need to be some tweaks here and there I believe the overall idea itself is sound.My idea would be to start a laser service- with a twist.Let's say someone posts an instructable in the laser group that requires the use of the laser for their project. I would provide that at a given cost based on the complexity of the job- let's just say $40. From that $40, 20% would go into a Paypal/bank account to be held seperately for a charity.Now let's say that person wants duplicates for themselves to sell on eBay or wherever. I would do this at a reduced cost, say $30. This is because the setup work has already been done. Now 25% of the money goes into the charity account.Now let's say that someone reads the original instructable and wants to create the item for themselves. It would cost them $40 but now $5 goes back to the creator of the instructable and still 20% goes into the charity account.When the charity account reaches $500 everyone that has posted an instructable in the laser group votes on where the money goes- it can be a school, Humane Society, Habitat for Humanity, needy family, scholarship fund, etc. but it will have to be limited to a few choices during every voting session. The money is then donated in the name of Instructables.com -everyone that creates something here gets to see their projects create a direct impact on the world around them in the form of this charity donation.The original creator of the instructable also gets $5 every time their instructable is used to create a product that they designed!Well that's my idea- I know the rules concerning the contest have changed but I'm still going to do this anyway if I'm lucky enough to win. That's been my plan all along and I think it's something that benefits everyone and I'm sticking to it! :DThanks!!And for those interested, more of my instructables are here: https://www.instructables.com/tag/?limit%3Atype%3Ainstructable=on&sort;=none&q;=Honus

Topic by Honus 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Global Warming - Ruling on Documentary

UK Broadcasting watchdog OfCom has ruled that the Channel 4 documentary The Great Global Warming Swindle broke broadcasting rules by implying that GW was not due to human activity.The film's key contentions were that the increase in atmospheric temperatures observed since the 1970s was not primarily caused by emissions of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, and that the modern focus on climate change is based in politics rather than science. It is seen in some "climate sceptic" circles as a counter to Al Gore's movie An Inconvenient Truth, and credited with influencing public perception of climate science. It has reportedly been sold to 21 countries and distributed on DVD. GW experts featured in the documentary complained that they were quoted out of context, had not been told of the aims of the programme makers, and some quotes attributed to experts were, allegedly, made up by the reporters."It's very disappointing that Ofcom hasn't come up with a stronger statement about being misled," said Sir John Houghton, a former head of the UK Met Office and chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) scientific assessment. "I know hundreds of people, literally hundreds, who were misled by it - they saw it, it was a well-produced programme and they imagined it had some truth behind it, so they were misled and it seems Ofcom didn't care about that," he told BBC News."The programme has been let off the hook on a highly questionable technicality," said Bob Ward, former head of media at the Royal Society, who played a prominent role in co-ordinating objections to the film. "The ruling noted that Channel 4 had admitted errors in the graphs and data used in the programme, yet decided that this did not cause harm or offence to the audience." Plaintiffs accused the programme of containing myriad factual inaccuracies, but Ofcom says it was "impractical and inappropriate for it to examine in detail all of the multifarious alleged examples... set out in the complaints." On another issue - whether contributors to the programme had been treated fairly - Ofcom mainly found against Channel 4 and the film's producer WagTV. Former UK chief scientific adviser Sir David King had been misquoted and had not been given a chance to put his case, the regulator said. Ofcom also found in favour of Carl Wunsch, an oceanographer interviewed for the programme, who said he had been invited to take part in a programme that would "discuss in a balanced way the complicated elements of understanding of climate change", but which turned out to be "an out-and-out propaganda piece, in which there is not even a gesture toward balance". The film alleged that the IPCC's scientific reports were driven by politics rather than science, and Ofcom ruled the organisation had not been given adequate time to respond. Full BBC article, plus links

Topic by Kiteman 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Electron Club Open Day Show and Tell, Glasgow 13 June

Electron Club Open Day2pm-8pm Saturday 13th June 2009Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, G2 3JDThe Electron Club is a voluntary run space where people interested in things like free open source software, circuit bending, hardware hacking, computer recycling, streaming, audio and video editing, green technologies, and amateur radio can meet, use equipment, and share anddisseminate their skills and ideas. The space supports both individuals developing their own projects and a number of group projects, all of which are not-for-profit initiatives with a community, educational or environmental aspect to them.Now in our third year, the Electron Club Open Days are an opportunity to see and try out a range of things that people do, as well as having the opportunity to meet others with similar interests, make, chat, discuss and enjoy.TESLA SOUL - Electron Club Makers Fair and homebaking - Bajery in the Makery!Stalls and demos by electronic makers, designers and artists. An opportunity to see and play with some of the projects created by Electron Club members and related groups - a theremin menagerie and mini synthesizer kits, 3D paper engineering, circuit bending, micro FM radio,DIY wind power technology, creative computer trash recycling, 101 things to do with a dead keyboard and much more. Plus some of the excellent home-baking that has been hallmark of all our Open Days. Come and do a bit of soldering or have a cup of tea and chat with the people who make things.TAPE-WIRE-HEAD-SCREEN - music, film and sound artsThe Electron Club includes many people working in music, film and experimental arts. For the Open Day we will be showing a preview of films from Document, the UK's leading human rights film festival, with works ranging from front-line reportage to cinematic explorations of what it is to be human, along with films made at the Electron Club by the Digital Desperados, a film-group for young black and Asian women. We'll have a live performance of Alvin Lucier's legendary "Music on A Long Thin Wire" by members of 'Obscure Desire of the Bourgeoisie' and BuffalobuffalobuffaloBuffalobuffalo'. Outdoors, artist Lucie Potter will invite people on a specially planned sound walk around the Garnethill area.THE LIFE OF SOCIAL THINGS - socially-engaged technology forumA series of discussions about different ways in which society and technology come together.Glasgow FabLabsFabLabs are small scale fabrication and construction workshops that provide computerised production technologies on an artisanal scale making them available to communities and independent makers and designers. From inner-city Boston to remote Indian villages, FabLabshave become a worldwide network of community technology centres. Glasgow FabLabs is a project aiming to bring such a centre to Glasgow. This forum will present the ideas behind the Glasgow FabLabs project and explore the benefits of community-access technology.Community Media and Citizens JournalismThe internet has offered a platform for communities and groups outside of the mainstream media to have a voice and share knowledge. Whilst there are many notable examples of such activity, the tools to create such a democratized media space are still often out of people's reach.This forum will look at some practical examples of community media coming from Glasgow, present some current projects looking to make ordinary people's voices more prominent and explore the relationships between the grass-roots and mainstream media.Technology, Social Justice and the EnvironmentHow can we use technology for the greater common good? Whilst the advance of technology promotes the promise of a better world, that promise has often been compromised or undermined in how we make use of such advances. Certain technological developments have contributed to environmental and social problems on a scale arguably never seen before.Technology, however, has also been used to tackle such issues as climate change and social injustice. This forum will share and explore some practical examples being used in Scotland today, from noise monitoring devices to participatory video and community mapping projects.RAFFLE - broadband fundraiserThis year we are raising funds to improve our network facilities at the Electron Club and we will be doing a raffle with prizes including a group voucher to go paintballing.http://www.electronclub.org Contact: openday@electronclub.org

Topic by greensteam 9 years ago


Digital Open: An Innovation Expo for Global Youth

IFTF, Sun, and Boing Boing just launched Digital Open, and I'm proud to share that I'm helping judge entries."What can you make with technology that will change the world, make the future -- or even just make life a little easier or more fun?"Institute for the Future, in partnership with Sun Microsystems and Boing Boing, invite youth worldwide, age 17 and under, to join us as we explore the frontiers of free and open innovation. Running from April 15 until August 15, 2009, the Digital Open: An Innovation Expo for Global Youth will accept text, photos, and videos documenting projects at DigitalOpen.org from young people around the world, all licensed under one from a list of free and open software licenses.Youth can submit projects in a variety of areas, ranging from the environment, media, and community, to the more traditional open source domains of software and hardware. Additionally, the Digital Open will provide resources and links to help them learn more about free and open technology movements, from figures like Richard Stallman to organizations like Creative Commons."As a company that engages schools, teachers and students from around the world to discover the transformative power of open technology, we jumped at the opportunity to work with the Institute for the Future to conceive and create The Digital Open," said Linda Rogers, Sun Microsystems' Director of Global Communities. "From Buenos Aries to Beijing to Budapest, we know that global youth are capable of spurring remarkable creativity and innovation. The Digital Open will be a window for the world to be impressed and optimistic about what the next generation will bring."Marina Gorbis, Executive Director of the Institute for the Future emphasized the participatory nature of the project. "The Digital Open is more than just a competition," she says. "It's about recognizing and encouraging kids to follow their passions while giving them community experiences that further encourage or challenge their best thinking."As an online, open source interpretation of the traditional high school science fair or world expo, the project's social networking-driven website encourages collaboration, communication, and sharing ideas. On DigitalOpen.org, youth can converse with each other about their projects, submit entries together, and win a series of achievement badges that they can repost on their own blogs and websites.The top project in each of our eight categories will be selected by our panel of approximately 20 judges, includes David-Michel Davies, Executive Director of the Webby Awards; Lawrence Lessig, Harvard/Creative Commons; David Pescovitz, Boing Boing; and Dale Dougherty, publisher of Make.To give the talented young innovators public exposure beyond the Digital Open, Boing Boing, a culture and technology blog with millions of readers, will feature each winner in his or her own video for the site. All of us at Boing Boing Video are excited about the opportunity to cultivate youth innovation in open technology," says Xeni Jardin, Boing Boing Video Host and Executive Producer. "We hope that young makers will use the Digital Open to really show off their work--and to connect with like-minded digital explorers around the world."The winning young innovators will also receive a technology prize package including a PeeCee mini laptop running the OpenSolaris operating system, a video camera, a solar-powered flashlight, and other assorted goodies.Forty years ago, IFTF's founders imagined a world in which it would be possible to improve human lives and build better organizations by thinking systematically about the future. These were visionaries saw the power of using computers and networks to build collective intelligence. Harnessing the intelligence of large groups of experts to develop forecasts, using new open-source tools take forecasting to the next level--engaging vastly larger groups of experts and non-experts in immersive experiences that allow us to envision multitudes of future possibilities in a dynamic and continuous way. DigitalOpen.org is the third open, collaborative platform that IFTF has launched this year where the public can participate in imagining and inventing the future, and the first specifically targeting youth--the true future of innovation.Find out more at digitalopen.org.Digital Open Judges:Lawrence Lessig, Creative Commons, Stanford Law SchoolDavid-Michel Davies, Webby Awards, International Academy of Digital Arts & SciencesDale Dougherty, O'Reilly Media, MAKEBilly Bicket, TechSoup/NetSquaredSimon Dingle, Finweek MagazinePatricia Lange, USC Institute for Multimedia LiteracyEric Wilhelm, InstructablesXeni Jardin, Boing BoingDavid Pescovitz, Boing Boing/IFTFKati London, Botanicalls & Area/CodeThe Playtime Anti-Boredom SocietyNick Bilton, New York Times/NYC ResistorJane McGonigal, IFTFJessica Mah, IntershipIN.comHeather Ford, Africa CommonsIsaac Mao, CNBlog.org, United Capital Investment, Global Voices OnlineColin Bulthaup, PotencoOona Castro, Overmundo InstituteElizabeth Stark, Yale Information Society Project, Students for Free CultureAhrash Bissel, Creative Commons, ccLearnPhoebe Ayers, Author: How Wikipedia WorksKiruba Shankar, Knowledge FoundationLinda Rogers, Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Topic by ewilhelm 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Proposal for a Multitasking Robot

Greetings, I am a senior EE major at Polytechnic University. I spent most of my time working with robotics and electronics. I always wanted to enter one of these robots competitions but finding the time and funds was always the problem. Its really interesting that iRobot is deciding to sponser a few teams. After brainstorming I came up with a few robot ideas that I believed novel. Then I thought about it some more and came up with more ideas. Instead of narrowing them down I thought how great would it be if all of them could be made. That led me into designing an idea for an iRobot Butler that can do many tasks. The idea is to create a modular robot that has the ability to dock with its base station and perform multiple tasks with different specialized modules. The project I propose is to develop the modular autonomous docking system and several modular tools for the robot to utilize. These tools can be used for entertainment purposes or for human aid. Here are a few concepts 1) Mobile Music docking station and amplifier - You have a stereo system, great! Only down side is its always stationary so you have to blast it till the neighbors know the lyrics if you want to hear it everywhere in the house. With this kind of a docking station just come home plug it in and let the music follow you. 2) IRobot key fob (that thing that opens your car) - Why have robot if you can't command it when you need it. With a IRobot linked to some off the shelf electronics you could have it meet you in whatever room you are in. 3) Where's the remote? Who knows? But iRobot can help you out by using a embedded universal remote following the sony ir protocol. Just give iRobot a buzz and he could come in and change it to your liking. 4) Not so Clocky Alarm Clock - Clocky is a robotic alarm clock. It rolls off its nightstand, hides somewhere in the room and then starts to wake you by forcing you to find where it hid. With the modular IRobot when you go to sleep it can hook up with its Music docking station and do pretty much the same thing. 5) Life Alert System - Many of us have been hurt at times where we wished someone could come to our aid. If you are in a accident and unable to reach a phone, press on IRobot's key fob and him lock onto another tool which brings you a cordless phone module to call for aid. The Docking Station The docking station for the robotic butler could be tracked using the same method as the self charging station. In order to remove platforms or add them a servo would be placed on the iRobot which would lock or unlock the tray. To maintain electrical connection between the two trays an array of spring header pins could be used. There are many great robotic ideas out there for the iRobot however the expense for one robot to only do one thing is pretty great. In order to compensate for the overhead expenditure a multifunctional robot with inexpensive and optional tools is a possible solution to suit home needs. This way all of the design entries can be utilized. Regarding my qualifications, I taught for three years as a teaching assistant to a freshman engineering course. My most recent completed project is the development of a chemical model car experiment and an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle design project for freshman engineering. Both of these projects underwent a rigourous amount of work and will be shown at the American Society of Engineering Education 2007 conference.

Topic by cooblades 11 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Eric Wilhelm wins TR35 Innovation Award

Sharing your projects and ideas on Instructables is now officially a Big Idea. Eric just won the TR35 award for top innovators under 35 from MIT's Technology Review magazine for his work with Instructables; check out the press release below, and read about the other winners.I'm pretty psyched to be part of this site, as we're clearly doing something exciting and important -- it's especially neat to be an early adopter with the power to change the way society works.-- ChristyProject-Sharing Website Creator Named Top Young InnovatorSan Francisco, CA - August 19, 2008 -- Eric Wilhelm has been recognized by Technology Review magazine as one of the world's top innovators under the age of 35 for creating Instructables.com, the Internet's #1 project-sharing website.Instructables.com began as a way for Eric to document his engineering work and grad-school kitesurfing projects, and has evolved into a world-wide hub for documenting and sharing creative projects. The site's simple, elegant step-by-step format provides an intuitive platform that allows anyone to publish their project, complete with pictures, text, and embedded video.In a world of mass-produced culture, hand-making and personalizing is experiencing a resurgence, and people everywhere are reviving classic skills and technologies. Instructables is the hub of this movement, providing a social and interactive environment to demonstrate amazing projects and ideas. The site dramatically lowers the barrier to sharing projects, enabling crafters, modders, engineers, artists, cooks, bicyclists, and techies to gather and share their work freely, and where cross-pollination is actively encouraged."Everyone wants to be a creator, not just a consumer," Eric explains. "We bring passionate people together to learn from each other. Instructables makes it cool to be smart." Instructables is also a valuable educational resource. Parents and teachers rely on Instructables as a source of project ideas, and students maintain their personal portfolios at the site. By coupling old-fashioned tinkering with thoughtful discussion and long-distance collaboration, Instructables has begun to revolutionize learning and innovation.Eric Wilhelm and the other TR35 winners for 2008 will be featured in the September issue of Technology Review magazine and honored at the EmTech08 Conference. "The TR35 honors young innovators for accomplishments that are poised to have a dramatic impact on the world as we know it," said Jason Pontin, editor in chief and publisher of Technology Review magazine, "We celebrate their success and look forward to their continued advancement of technology in their respective fields."About Eric Wilhelm:Eric earned his SB, SM, and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from MIT, where he developed methods to print electronics and micro-electromechanical systems using nanoparticles. He co-founded Squid Labs, an innovation and design partnership, and a number of Squid Labs spin-off companies including Potenco, producing a human-powered generator for cell phones and laptops; Makani, an energy company seeking to harness high-altitude wind; OptiOpia, developing low-cost portable vision-testing and lens-fabricating devices; and Instructables, a collaborative how-to site that helps people document and share a process or skill. See Eric's How To Start A Business Instructable for the more detailed story.About Instructables.com:Instructables is the most popular Do It Yourself community on the Internet. Started in August 2005, Instructables provides accessible tools and publishing instructions to enable passionate, creative people to share their most innovative projects, recipes, ideas, and hacks. The site is currently home to over 14,000 projects covering such diverse areas as crafts, art, kids, electronics, pets, bikes, cars, robotics, green projects, and cooking.About Technology Review, Inc.:Technology Review, Inc., an independent media company owned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is the authority on the future of technology, identifying emerging technologies and analyzing their impact for leaders. Technology Review's media properties include Technology Review magazine, the oldest technology magazine in the world (founded in 1899); the daily news website TechnologyReview.com; and events such as the annual EmTech Conference at MIT. ContactsFor Instructables:Christy Canida, 510-931-5622press (at) instructables (dot) comFor Technology Review:Sarah Mees, 978-208-1499press (at) technologyreview (dot) com More news and press about Instructables here.

Topic by canida 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Instructables in the New York Times - In a Highly Complex World, Innovation From the Top Down

Instructables, and my Purple Shoes got a nice mention in the New York Times here.In a Highly Complex World, Innovation From the Top Downby G. PASCAL ZACHARYUSER-GENERATED content - from Wikipedia to YouTube to open-source software - is generating waves of excitement. But the opening of innovation to wider numbers of people obscures another trend: many of the most popular new products, like the iPod, are dominated by a top-down, elite innovation model that doesn't allow for customization."New technologies are becoming so complex that many are beyond the possibility of democracy playing a role in their development," said Thomas P. Hughes, a science and technology professor at the University of Pennsylvania.Consider: Electronic implants into human bodies; gene-splicing as common as cosmetic surgery; computer networks mining vast databases to discern consumer preferences. All of these innovations are the result of corporate or government initiatives overseen by elites."The process of innovation leaves out a huge proportion of the population," said Daniel Sarewitz, director of the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes at Arizona State University.To be sure, experts like Eric von Hippel, a management professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, argue that the proliferation of "user-generated" designs signals the "democratizing" of innovation. Armed with inexpensive digital tools and networks, ordinary people, he says, can band together to push their own innovations. They also can hijack existing technologies, taking them in directions only dimly envisioned by the original creators.One example is an electronic community called Instructables whose participants share methods for customizing standard products in unpredictable ways. The chief of Instructables, Eric J. Wilhelm, who earned his doctorate at M.I.T., where he was inspired by Mr. von Hippel, has posted a clever means of turning a white Asics Gel-Foundation 7 running shoe into a purple model. (The $90 official version comes only in a white-black-and-blue combination.)Today's Web-savvy consumers "expect innovations to meet their needs," Mr. Wilhelm says. "If innovation isn't tailored to them, they expect to be able to tailor it to themselves. That is a big change."But does this really mean that elites no longer sit at the top of the innovation food chain?"Elites have a lot of leverage but less than they used to," says Peter Leyden, director of the New Politics Institute in San Francisco. "More people are getting their voices heard." Mr. Leyden sees an emergent American "republic of innovation," where growing numbers of people influence what innovations are made and when.Skeptics, however, say that the rosy scenario is exaggerated and that user-generated innovation is merely a kind of "democracy lite," emphasizing high-end consumer products and services rather than innovations that broadly benefit society."Difficult questions are going unasked about who is participating in innovation and on what terms," says James Wilsdon, director of the innovation program at Demos, a think tank in London.In that scenario, needed innovations can be overlooked. For example, huge amounts of money are spent on improving Web search engines or MP3 players, while scant attention is given to alternative energy sources. Battling diseases like AIDS or Alzheimer's - efforts that lobbying groups in wealthy countries help highlight - attract legions of well-financed innovators, while big global killers, like childhood diarrhea and sleeping sickness, are ignored.Popular pressure to pursue certain innovations sometimes gets results, of course. In 2004, voters in California passed a law lavishly funding a stem-cell research institute - in a rebuke to the Bush administration, which has banned federal funding for such research. "This was a great example of a democratic adjudication of an innovation issue," Mr. Sarewitz of Arizona State said. Even so, bureaucratic and legal delays have meant a slow start for the San Francisco lab, which has not yet received approval to spend any of the $3 billion in promised taxpayer funds.The California example suggests that the balance between expert leadership and mass influence is hard to achieve. The underlying complexity of many innovations demands an ever-rising technological literacy from the public, and yet such an outcome "is a dream that will not likely come to pass," insists Mr. Hughes, a visiting professor at M.I.T.For all the hoopla over the power and promise of user-generated content, consumer-directed design and other hallmarks of our new golden era of democratized innovation, one of the iconic products of our times - the iPod - can't be customized (no, I'm not counting putting on different-colored protective jackets). There is an unbroken line between Henry Ford (with his Model T) and Steve Jobs. The new iPhone similarly reflects the elite, corporate innovator's drive to find one size that fits many.The cliche that committees can't create great ideas, or art, still seems to be true - though whether or not that is the best way to innovate remains an open question. Who knows how much longer?

Topic by ewilhelm 11 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Free Energy - Am I insane or is it time to wake up?

Some might have noticed that I started a few, lets say, unconventional topics here.I added one just as a response to some very nasty feedback I got in other places.If you wonder what I am talking about check my topics about all things related to magnetism, "free energy" and such nonsense.The feedback I got was directed personal enough and verbal enough that I decided to increase my speed of seeding bread crumbs that might allow other people to "see" things slightly differently.Being called insane and mental case is the only things I use here as most of the rest would qualify as insults of the worst kind.The goal that was claimed I totally missed is to make people open up.Science or knowledge is as fluent as life itself.It eveloves with us, around us and through us.But we learned to use technology mostly to replace humans and to make our life easier.With that laziness also a reduced "desire" for knowledge and understand evolved.It is now far easier to "Google it" and forget it right after than to acutally learn and really understand something.A prime example is the disappearing artform of creating Japanese swords.No industrial process can produce a steel as pure and with such properties as used to be "offered" to the master swordsmith.Both are highly specialsed and rely on each other to create the perfect sword that outlasts generations.Once tradition gives way to modern life even this art will become a lost artform.We lost so much already, be it species, health, enviroment or just a "clean planet".Instead of accepting nature back into our scientific thinking and understanding we will continue to fail and get even more reluctant to learn new things.The blockbusters of science are no longer finding new laws of phsics or trying to understand things.We try to go further and further and use more and more dangerous ways to "create" the energy we continue to use more and more with no regrets.Well, other than complaining about the bills for it, which we wouldn't have otherwise...Why do we need more forms of colliding atoms to create energy?No because we need so much, only because we want more and more and at "centralised" locations.Distribution, control, money...Allowing us to use solar panels to reduce our electricity bill is nice, but try to overdo it and make good money by creating you own solar panel park and you get into trouble already.You can't see it anywhere other then back to your provider.And you only get whatever he thinks is a fair price for it, usually far less than what you pay to get it.Once you reach zero some even won't pay you money at all.And since there is always winter and night times it is only good that there will be always a need for electricity from the grid.Just try to get rid of your elecricity, water and gas connection in a township or city in case you found other sources you get for free.....Even if you build new most won't even allow you to without these "required" connections.If you need waste waster you also need tap water you pay for.And since a waste water treatment is no longer hyginic enough (despite proving the opposite) you can't get out.Gas you might be able to avoid but if there is electricity in the stree than it is already a building requirement to provie to the builder...What if all this nonsense and fakery actually has a true background somewhere?Humans are not meant to fly but we developed planes anyways.What once was a dream for a select few is now the prefered travel mode ofr most going on a far away holiday.But it is only so popular because there is a big demand.And where is demand profit can be made.Like a farmer:If you have ton of corn like twenty farmers around you then your local price will be low.Sell them a bit further away and you might get a lot more.In return our demand is closly related to the demands of those that provide the source of your demands.We all need energy and we evolve into a society that will need more of with every new generation.I try to give you hint in the form of a comparison:If you have a nice man cave and love to tinker than you might have a framed hand drill on the wall to remind you of how it all started for your grandfather.Or in most case you just liked it and got it for 2 bucks from a garage sale LOLEither, imagine all electricity would be gone and lost forever.Suddenly this crappy drill becomes a status symbol because only you can do things other people really struggle with - you drill holes with ease...Imagine the rpice you could ask to sell it..."Free energy" is the same but sadly in reverse.If a company sees a profit than it will be utilised some way.And if it happens that energy is your main income and keeps you rich and in control than you don't mind paying two or three fortunes to someone so he can forget and is happy give you his machine.Or would you really say no to life of no limits and with nothing to worry for your future generations of kids and grandkids?A few tried anyway to make a furtune themself by keeping a circle of trusted persons and finding enough willing investors to get their project going.Even if you can find some flaws there are still doubts about what someone would go through the lenght of providing online updates, sales numbers, testimonials and so on for years.Funny enough actually finding someone who is sceptic and make him check and report about it does not work either.No big university orders one or asks to really check it and provide a real world testimonial.No government or legal agency steps in to stop the "fraud" either.What is real, what is fake, what is disguise - you can figure it out if you want to.Ok, I could, but why bother if litereally everyone one already did and showed nothing works when it comes to the great unknown?Exactly for that reason alone it is worth it!People might make money now from ads or through clickbait but the topic is older than the internet already.And the proof even older than electricity...So many people would not try unless someone convinced them to try it ;)Might be just a bad joke but gets the point:If you ask 20 people if you can swim through the river to get to the other side then you might get confusing answers.1. No problem it is safe.Fully true but the guy might be from far up the river where it has no crocodiles in it...2. You could try it but a boat is safer as there might be corcodiles here.Still leaves you the option to swim as you can't be sure about the reptiles...You could go on and create a near endless list with bridges up ahead and so on.What it comes to is that depending on HOW you ask and WHO you ask the answers can be as different as day and night.In terms of science and making someone understand it take the most basic approach possible.Remember that time in school when your math teacher confronted you the existence of negative numbers?The confusion with the zero and how to add, subtract or multiply...Your teacher might have been great or you a quick learner but imagine the worst possible way to teach you an understanding of negative numbers!You know that 5 - 8 equals -3.You learned that this is true and why it is so.Imagine your teacher would have explained this extra simple like back with the apples when learning to add numbers."If there are 5 people in a room and 8 people leave the room, then 3 people must go back in so that room is empty!"Makes total sense if you expand the number game from above to 5 - 8 + 3 = 0 !!No sense at all however if you do it with people ;)People are not numbers, pressures or volumes, they are "real" to us.We associate certain things automatically, other we learn to associate and interpret through learning.Learning however is no longer actually doing all that would be involved in less technological world.We like magic tricks because we fail to understand how it is done or sometimes even how it is possible.Today it is for entertainment only.A true magician would never use his skills to scam people.But spend enough and research and you can do the same trick you saw on stage.Some not as good or not all though - thats life...Ask a good magician how how long it took him to get his new trick ready for the stage and quite often you get to hear it was years in the making.Think about that fact when you judge what is possible by dedication ;)

Question by Downunder35m 5 weeks ago


Your thoughts on "UFO's", strange things and the unknown

Don't take what comes below too serious please ;) I thought for the start of the new year it would be fun to talk about things we take for granted or that we would call nonsense. You know topis like those provided by Erich Däniken and other that think outside the conventional archiological range. Modern science has provided us with new insights into very old stuff but also a new look on things we thought to know better anyway. Here is some food for thought: 1. India... In this beautiful and old country it was discovered that hundreds if not over 2000 years ago people used lathe technology on stones. For example to make pillars with a weight over a few tons... Chains were created from molten rock and in many areas you find polished stone that even after hundreds of years still has a mirror finnish. Some of these creations are claimed to be made with hammer and chisel but how do you get a displayed accuracy that even modern technology struggles to provide? I don't want to clutter everything with video links but check Youtube and you will find temples in India showing musical granite pillars and chambers carved into solid rock with a precision that seems impossible! If that long ago human knd already knew about gear systems and lathe technology, then what else have we lost over time that we now claim as new technologies? How could anyone polish an entire granite hall and a big one that is to a mirror finnish? 2. Peru... Apart from being full of archeological wonders there is also the impossible to be found. The Nazca region shows, in aerial views, kilometer long and perfectly straight lines. In other regions, also in other continents, we can see images of strange people or artwork - again only from high above ground level. Some of the artwork is only in correct proportions and with proper contours if watched from a very specific angle to the mountain in question. The kilometer long lines are not simply on standard mountain faces but instead on top of mountain that have the top removed to be perfectly flat. And even with a lot of posible options to interpret the lines they look like any other huge, modern airport landing strips - including runways and tracks to areas we would call terminals or service bays. You can ignore all possible ways to interpret the design and possible use, what you can't ignore is the missing mountain top and level of accuracy on such a massive scale! 3. Pyramids... On all continents except Australia we find pyramid structures with very similar features in terms of proportions, angles and the way the face in a certain direction. In Egypt they just recently found another hidden chamber... Tunnels, too small for a human to fit point to stars and star signs. Some of the tools used to create were found with the help of small robots but also that some seem to be quite modern in age. Did grave robbers use them at a time were it is beleived that such tools were impossible to create? Or could they be as old as the pyramids itself? In south america we find pyramid structures looking quite similar to those in Egypt - why so similar in features and appearance if there was no contact between the two civilisations? To make things worse some of the Inca structures show tunnel and channel systems "leading" to the pyramid in question. Classic thought is that they were like tunnels to direct water or provide access in the beleive the jungle was not removed to hide the complex. Makes no sense if you see the city like areas that are now exposed and studied. I mean: how would created a city in the jungle without removing the trees?? What could make you wonder is a simulation that was performed several years ago. Based on a computer model in 3D different theories were tested. Irrigation was ruled out quickly, same for access routes or secret tunnels for the priests. One funny student got bored and decided to play god. Assuming the Inca priests would call their gods in the sky temple to provide rain he let a monsoon go down on the pyramid. The result was unexpected so he showed the results to his companions and they did the same test agin but simulated a massive airflow going down directly on the pyramid. Turned out the flow would be directed away under ground with more efficiency than systems Nasa uses today for rockets and space shuttles... Mind you the tunnels are far from straight and without this simulation it was trusted that they could not do this stuff... We now have rocket technology that uses surface direction and vector control. The square and flat designs leave a void insight that pretty much perferctly match the angles of those inca pyramids? Apart from pure coincidence, what could be the reason for this match in shape and angle with a tunnel system perfect to remove hot engine gasses? Ok, I admit, not all continents, the pyramids in Bosnia are just a hoax, so Europe is out of the race ;) Sorry Semir :) 4. Artwork... Be it here in Australia, the African desert or America - we find images of mystical people or rulers that could make you wonder. Again modern tech in the form color filtering, desitity readings and 3D scanning provided us details unseen before. If you think of gods in very ancient times and try to imagine you would be a native: What do think how many different images of their god could 100 people imagine? Let's agree it would be plenty... But if we study artwork in caves and rocks from around the world we find similarities that IMHO can't be explained. Many show features that, compared with modern technology, could be mistaken for helmets, gloves or even manual control systems. Others show things thought to be as simple as pine cones to resemble modern milling or finnishing tools. Again only possible by enhancing details the naked eye won't see. With no contact to each other and often thausand of years apart: What could the reason for having images of their gods show very similar and sometimes identical "features" ? 5. UFO technology and sightings... Some people love to post videos of secret weapons and UFO's that are simple rocket launches at a perfect time and with perfect weather conditions to attract attention. But what about the things we don't get to see? Just recently the US finally admitted to have a program to investigate what we might call "UFO activity", quite costly one too... This means a lot of leaked videos from fighter planes or spy planes you find on the net are actually the real deal. Often "enhanced" with editing tools but authentic ones have been released by the military and other organisations now too. If it happens over US ground and no US organisations admits to be flying the things we see than what it is? Right, it is a UFO - An Unidentified Flying Object! Does not mean it is alien, despite far too many people thinking an UFO must be alien :( UFO means just that! At the time of seeing it the ones seeing it can not identify the craft or "thing". And, no you are not alone! ;) Happens in all parts of the world and even commercial pilots upload what they can't explain. Oh, you are still a sceptic? Does that mean you think some of these sightings must be alien or do think someone down here uses technology we are not supposed to know of? If you are like me you might like to relax watching the live feed from the ISS. In case you are not try it anyway! Every noticed that that despite the stations own speed "forgeign" objects appear to come towards the station or even to grow in size very quickly? If so you also noticed another very strange thing... No matter what happens up there the stream keeps playing, even at times when the station is moved around a bit to avoid a possible hit with debris. But every single time something appears to move around the ISS or come close to it the feed cuts out. Ok, not every time, for well known stuff orbiting around like satellites, other stations, rocket lauchnes or supply flights they stay on. So, what are those flying objects changing course and direction or even circling the station? Why does the live feed cut out once an object is identified to be unidentified? 6. Roswell technology boom... Some think the US did take ownership of an alien craft, you know the stories and movies I mean... So called eye witness reports and some leaked documents all claim certain unknown technology in great detail. Anything from fibre optics and microchips, over "intelligent metals" to light enhancing glass lenses and seemingly indestructable fibres... Some say that if we would had the option to copy and understand the technology to copy it (without knowing anything about it of course) then the tech boom of the 60' would have been instantly. Imagine flat screen TV's and smartphones with GPS 50 years ago for everyone... ;) 7. Great land in the south - Antartica... The mysteries originating from Antartica range from Atlantis over hidden civilisations and living dinosaurs to the often claimed secret Nazi base with submarines and lost technologies. We all know that life as we know it can't really exists down there, so no strange animals, ancient creatures or a possibility to sustain a secret military base some 60 years ago. Or it there more to it?? Warm lakes containing fresh water with signs of life in them have already been discovered. Same for caves under the ice with temperatures far above freezing - constantly and again with signs of life. Ages ago the continent was still joint with other and in a warmer region so no wonder to find fossils. If we already found places that sustained life for thausands of years then what living things might be down there? Maybe even a place like the Galapagos Islands but for life thought be extinct - imagine Jurassic Park for real under the ice ;) With thriving life, vulcanos, rivers, lakes and all long before the dinosaurs it is not hard to imagine the remains under the ice and carved into the mountains. In todays times it all covered by ice and the sea level is much much higher, so again not hard to imagine that there might be rivers running off under the ice and into the ocean. Some maybe even connected to lakes in a hot spot sustaining life. A secret base from some secret part of the Nazi regime over 60 years ago?? Well, with all we know today about Antartica and is also known about the technological options available at that time it is possible. A submarine could have operated for days or even a few weeks under the ice with support ships available. Not just with so called secret tech but simply with a big sub on a minimum crew and the support of crude ways to reclaim and produce oxygen. If an entrance to a river leading to a suistainable area exists or existed at that time it would have been just a matter of time and endurance to find it. Of course we can't know if it was already found and removed or used since those with capable submarines and technology these days would not talk about it ;) But private or non government explorations map and drill more than ever, so once they hit "restricted areas" or create their own base and research station under the ice we will know ;) What to do if you actually see (or think you do) a real UFO?? Grab the oldest and dirtiest camera aou can find, mount it on the end of your longest fishing pole and create the shakiest video possible. And please make no references at all that would allow to get on the loctation, time or date. Jokes aside there is a good option these days, your modern smartphone, telescope, GoPro or favourite drone. A fake is often uploaded in very bad resolution often so low you might think an old webcam was used. Good fakes are often just a rocket launch, so check for this before you claim it is of unknown origins. Modern tech allows us to record a video in 4K at 60 or even 120FPS , so no excuse for a 320x240 AVI video LOL Optical zoom causes bad results so try to avoid it if possible. Image stabilisation can do wonders for free hand shots of moving objects, so crank it to the max even if the resulting video is a bit smaller in resolution. Geotagging is also a good thing as it allows an easy reference. You might see much more with you eye than what the video show, or in the best case the other way around. That means before you upload take a step back and try too see the video like someone who was not there when it happened! Are the movements reall that impossible? Is it really not just a plane, rocket flares? What sounds did you hear at the time or shortly after that might not be audible in the video? Sometimes a plane in the distance still is in the sunlight while you already stand in the dark - keep elevation in mind ;) Compare with other videos online that claim to be taken around the same time and area - sure you did not film a rocket launch? But if your video is crystal clear and shows the impossible in great detail you might want to check for the usual markings on military aircrafts or flashing lights in green and red. Still all good and impossible to explain? Then what are you waiting for? Tell us where, when and with what type of gear and upload the video so we get evidence of unknown technologies in the use/testing or an actual UFO - Unidentified flying object, until we know better. ;) Again don't take me too serious today but enjoy some of the thoughts and let your imagination wander off a bit. Lost technologies and knowlege exists, existed, is found again - whatever you want to call it. If humans could move stone blocks the size of a small house and create them with an accuracy down to the mm then they might have known more than we think they did. If we could melt granite to form new things, manipulate its sound or carve hollow heads of just a few mm in size then again we lost something well worth knowing. If in ancient times people had no way of seeing really distant and dim stars then how were they able to accurately map them and predict their movement? If milling and lathe technology was known and used when in other parts of the world we were happy to create simple and weak tools: How was it possible to create gears and know about planetary gear systems? If the evidence of the work clearly shows advance technologies used then where are the tools used and why can we find any written records or images of it being used? If even the all mighty US military, secret agencies and space programs fail to explain what they encounter quite often since we fly around: What is really that seems to try to hide from us while appearing to watch how we evolve, explore and fight wars? Since you still bother to read all this nonsense: If it appears we have "evidence" of the existance of beings capable of flying or even space travel since the dawn of time and add all the modern evidence: Is it possible someone or something has been watching us since humans came to be? Did "they" guide some cultures at some stage during their evolution to show us modern ways of creating alloys, machine stuff or understand what was magic or the gods at that time? And if they did help our evolution in some parts then why did this greatly improved society disappear with no more trace than their stone remains? How would we react if they dare to help us again? Is there a reason that even after countless encounters noone tried to shoot one of the UFO's down? I mean, not even a claim for trying since Rosswell..... Not any evidence of a recent landing either..... Or are we just watched so closely because they want something back we too from them??? ;) I blame all spelling mistakes on my annoyingly unresponsive keyboard. But if you still find some then feel free to keep them! I still demand a fee if use them to make money from them ;)

Topic by Downunder35m 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


8 Reasons you'll rejoice when we hit $8 a gallon gasoline

This article in MarketWatch written by Chris Pummer mostly matches my opinions. My favorite is #2Here is the text:SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) -- For one of the nastiest substances on earth, crude oil has an amazing grip on the globe. We all know the stuff's poison, yet we're as dependent on it as our air and water supplies -- which, of course, is what oil is poisoning.Shouldn't we be technologically advanced enough here in the 21st Century to quit siphoning off the pus of the Earth? Regardless whether you believe global warming is threatening the planet's future, you must admit crude is passé. Americans should be celebrating rather than shuddering over the arrival of $4-a-gallon gasoline. We lived on cheap gas too long, failed to innovate and now face the consequences of competing for a finite resource amid fast-expanding global demand.A further price rise as in Europe to $8 a gallon -- or $200 and more to fill a large SUV's tank -- would be a catalyst for economic, political and social change of profound national and global impact. We could face an economic squeeze, but it would be the pain before the gain.The U.S. economy absorbed a tripling in gas prices in the last six years without falling into recession, at least through March. Ravenous demand from China and India could see prices further double in the next few years -- and jumpstart the overdue process of weaning ourselves off fossil fuels.Consider the world of good that would come of pricing crude oil and gasoline at levels that would strain our finances as much as they're straining international relations and the planet's long-term health: 1. RIP for the internal-combustion engineThey may contain computer chips, but the power source for today's cars is little different than that which drove the first Model T 100 years ago. That we're still harnessed to this antiquated technology is testament to Big Oil's influence in Washington and success in squelching advances in fuel efficiency and alternative energy.Given our achievement in getting a giant mainframe's computing power into a handheld device in just a few decades, we should be able to do likewise with these dirty, little rolling power plants that served us well but are overdue for the scrap heap of history.2. Economic stimulusNecessity being the mother of invention, $8 gas would trigger all manner of investment sure to lead to groundbreaking advances. Job creation wouldn't be limited to research labs; it would rapidly spill over into lucrative manufacturing jobs that could help restore America's industrial base and make us a world leader in a critical realm.The most groundbreaking discoveries might still be 25 or more years off, but we won't see massive public and corporate funding of research initiatives until escalating oil costs threaten our national security and global stability -- a time that's fast approaching. 3. Wither the Middle East's cloutThis region that's contributed little to modern civilization exercises inordinate sway over the world because of its one significant contribution -- crude extraction. Aside from ensuring Israel's security, the U.S. would have virtually no strategic or business interest in this volatile, desolate region were it not for oil -- and its radical element wouldn't be able to demonize us as the exploiters of its people.In the near term, breaking our dependence on Middle Eastern oil may well require the acceptance of drilling in the Alaskan wilderness -- with the understanding that costly environmental protections could easily be built into the price of $8 gas. 4. Deflating oil potentatesOn a similar note, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez and Iran's Mahmoud Ahmadinejad recently gained a platform on the world stage because of their nations' sudden oil wealth. Without it, they would face the difficult task of building fair and just economies and societies on some other basis.How far would their message resonate -- and how long would they even stay in power -- if they were unable to buy off the temporary allegiance of their people with vast oil revenues? 5. Mass-transit developmentAnyone accustomed to taking mass transit to work knows the joy of a car-free commute. Yet there have been few major additions or improvements to our mass-transit systems in the last 30 years because cheap gas kept us in our cars. Confronted with $8 gas, millions of Americans would board buses, trains, ferries and bicycles and minimize the pollution, congestion and anxiety spawned by rush-hour traffic jams. More convenient routes and scheduling would accomplish that.6. An antidote to sprawlThe recent housing boom sparked further development of antiseptic, strip-mall communities in distant outlying areas. Making 100-mile-plus roundtrip commutes costlier will spur construction of more space-efficient housing closer to city centers, including cluster developments to accommodate the millions of baby boomers who will no longer need their big empty-nest suburban homes.Sure, there's plenty of land left to develop across our fruited plains, but building more housing around city and town centers will enhance the sense of community lacking in cookie-cutter developments slapped up in the hinterlands. 7. Restoration of financial disciplineFar too many Americans live beyond their means and nowhere is that more apparent than with our car payments. Enabled by eager lenders, many middle-income families carry two monthly payments of $400 or more on $20,000-plus vehicles that consume upwards of $15,000 of their annual take-home pay factoring in insurance, maintenance and gas.The sting of forking over $100 per fill-up would force all of us to look hard at how much of our precious income we blow on a transport vehicle that sits idle most of the time, and spur demand for the less-costly and more fuel-efficient small sedans and hatchbacks that Europeans have been driving for decades. 8. Easing global tensionsUnfortunately, we human beings aren't so far evolved that we won't resort to annihilating each other over energy resources. The existence of weapons of mass destruction aside, the present Iraq War could be the first of many sparked by competition for oil supplies.Steep prices will not only chill demand in the U.S., they will more importantly slow China and India's headlong rush to make the same mistakes we did in rapidly industrializing -- like selling $2,500 Tata cars to countless millions of Indians with little concern for the environmental consequences. If we succeed in developing viable energy alternatives, they could be a key export in helping us improve our balance of trade with consumer-goods producers. Additional considerationsWeaning ourselves off crude will hopefully be the crowning achievement that marks the progress of humankind in the 21st Century. With it may come development of oil-free products to replace the chemicals, pharmaceuticals, plastics, fertilizers and pesticides that now consume 16% of the world's crude-oil output and are likely culprits in fast-rising cancer rates.By its very definition, oil is crude. It's time we develop more refined energy sources and that will not happen without a cost-driven shift in demand.

Topic by Keith-Kid 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Is working with your hands better than just with your head?

I saw this on the BBC, and was so impressed I've reproduced the whole thing here: By Tom de Castella Journalist If the new year and inevitable return to work leaves you yearning for change, is working with your hands the answer? The time for reflection is nigh - a new year, a new you. But is that workstation you've slotted back into looking depressingly familiar? As millions of workers drag themselves back into the office to contemplate another 12 months of drudgery, many will be wondering if they are in the right job. Writer and mechanic Matthew Crawford thinks a lot of us would be better off trading in our mouse for a screwdriver. His recent book, The Case for Working With Your Hands, has been a huge hit in his native United States, praised by critics and politicians alike. Mr Crawford, who used to run a Washington think tank but now mends motorbikes, says it is no wonder people are miserable at work. Jobs have become so specialised and process driven that it is hard to see what difference you are making. And in those rare cases where one's impact is obvious, the result may seem pointless. Jealousy "A lot of us are plagued with a sense of uselessness," he says. "I've created a brand - what good is that? So I've persuaded people to buy something they didn't need." When running a think tank, he says he honestly could not see the rationale for being paid at all, and wondered what tangible goods or services he was providing to anyone. Then he opened a motorbike repair shop and was surprised to find he was not just happier, but more intellectually stimulated. The life of a tradesman is a varied existence, mixing practicality with logic and problem solving, he says. "Imagine you're an electrician, you're installing a conduit pipe and have to bend around the corners to make everything line up. It's the kind of work that requires improvisation and adaptation. It can never be reduced to following set procedures." Not only that, the earning potential for a tradesman is greater than in many office jobs. For instance, a skilled mechanic is likely to earn more than a sociology graduate working in publishing, he argues. Not everything about manual work is rosy. He warns that furniture making is not a good career move - Ikea can undercut you by employing workers in China for a fraction of the price. But a range of trades that need to be done on site cannot be outsourced to low wage economies. After new year introspection, January and February are traditionally one of the busiest periods for moving jobs. Mr Crawford believes doing a trade can make you happier. 'Middle-class paradox' "It offers small moments of confirmation, like when the bike you're mending starts up and runs. Small satisfactions like that can be elusive at a huge organisation with vast layers of management, where the criteria by which you're measured are ambiguous." The Times columnist Giles Coren recently tried working with his hands for the BBC Two show Giles and Sue Live the Good Life. Despite his on-screen schtick of appearing to hate everything the duo are asked to do, he fell in love with it. "I found chasing the chickens and weeding the allotment immensely satisfying," he says. "The pain... was making the television show." He agrees with Mr Crawford that modern life has been blighted by a series of alienating processes, often carried out on mobile phone, laptop and e-mail. In this way, his chosen career - journalism - has been stripped of its sense of adventure and human contact. "Even 15 years ago when I started as a reporter, you left the office to do a story. You went to investigate, visited people and used the cuttings library. Now I just sit... and Google. It's terrible, I wish I was a fireman." Despite his columnist's salary, he is jealous of those whose jobs have a clear purpose like the gardener and cleaner. "My gardener Brian comes in to do the garden every two weeks. He takes his shirt off in the summer and smokes a rollie. I can see him through the window, but I'm sitting indoors, staring at the screen to pay for this guy - it's the classic middle-class paradox." Rory Sutherland, vice-chairman of advertising firm Ogilvy UK, agrees that working with your hands does offer greater satisfaction in the short term. But manual workers lack something many of us crave - influence. Jobs like advertising where you "work with your head" may seem futile, but the ideas they come up with really do change the world, he says. "Five years ago someone worked out that you could have one size lid for the three different sizes of coffee cup that cafes have. Ok, it's emphatically not the cure for cancer, but it's through millions of little ideas like this that we get richer as a society." Perception of value Television dramas like Mad Men depict the office to be a place of invigorating competition, sexual tension and creativity. However stylised the portrayal, Mr Sutherland says there is a definite buzz to working around like-minded people - one that tradesmen miss out on. "People partly enjoy work because it's social, but working with your hands can be lonely." And he believes that experienced trades people are often economically undervalued due to the perverse way that consumers ascribe worth. He cites the behavioural economist Dan Ariely's story about a locksmith. As a young apprentice, the tradesman used to take half an hour to mend a lock, at which point he'd be thanked wholeheartedly and given a tip. When he became more experienced, the locksmith could fix a similar problem in a minute. He charged the same rate and completed the job much faster. But instead of being pleased at his speed, customers complained about his rates and refused to tip him. "It's about our perception of value." And in this respect the skilled tradesman will often struggle, he says. In the course of researching his book The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work, Alain de Botton concludes that we all want to make a difference in our job, however banal that change may be. "At the end of the working day we want to feel we've left the planet slightly healthier, tidier, saner than it was at the beginning," he says. "I'm not necessarily talking of huge changes - the difference might merely involve sanding a stair banister, removing the squeak on a door or reuniting someone with their lost luggage." And yet, it is a mistake to romanticise working with your hands, he warns. "At heart, what you're talking about is the charm of craft work. And it's my sense this can happen in places far removed from the workshop. If you're writing computer code you are in a sense displaying many of the same skills as a craftsperson, even if the finished product can't be held or touched." But following the financial crisis, Mr de Botton says attitudes to all types of work may be changing. He detects a move away from the middle-class idea that work lies "at the heart of our self-fulfillment", to the working-class view of employment as a means of feeding yourself and your family. So maybe job satisfaction is slipping down the list of what is important when it comes to work.

Topic by Kiteman 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago