ink jet printer

Help, I want to make pillows for my kids with pictures of their dogs.  I cannot find any place in Phoenix that has ink jet printers.  What can I do??? Cyndie

Topic by cvanhook 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


ink jet printer to cutter?

Ive got an ink jet printer that bust on me a few days ago, and ive always wonered if it would be possible to replace the ink cartrages with a cutting blade and use it as a vinyl/cardboard/anything else you can think of cutter. my school had a vinyl cutter which i used a lot, but i dont have access to that any more. the only problems i can see are things like "how can i get the blade to come off the paper between letters etc? how would it cope with changes in direction? could it be programmed to follow a line instead of the side to side action?" if this wouldnt work, anyone got any other ideas for a cocked up ink jet printer? shame to waste it. attach a laser?? lol. a really budget laser cutter. could the motors and rails be used for anything else? its got a scanner attached too, but i cant think of a use for that, other than turning it into a SAD lamp (seasonal affected disorder). i think it would be bright enough. ideas?

Topic by roosta 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


old ink jet printer?

What can be made out of an old injet printer? it doesnt print and give the age to much to have repaired shurley it can still be used for some thing else ?

Question by Eyewondery 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Ink jet phot transfer

Ok so I am doing a project it and looking for a nice way to finish it off. I have this part down pretty good... I have laser printed photos use acrylic medium to transfer the photo to the wood. Then I put some mod podge gloss coat over it. And this looks fine. But... I have recently been interested in using a product called "glaze coat" it's a 2 part epoxy that is used for thinks like counter tops and stuff just gives it a nice hard crystal clear glossy finish. But I'm worried that it might destroy the pictures in the wood if I use it. Any ideas or experience doing this.

Question by Sscarey04 1 year ago


am wondering if there is a way to sanitize ink jet printer cartriges?

I want to make a printer that prints on food just need to sanitize cartridges first

Question by Slicerr2 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago



I want to take a standard inkjet printer and turn it into a solvent ink printer any ideas?

I want to use this for making full color bumper stickers on vinyl. etc

Question by 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


My Brother Ink-Jet Printer should be able to print on transfer paper but it won't? Answered

I have a brother ink jet printer and im trying to print on crayola transfer paper and i did everything right problem is the ink from the printer is on but a whole wackload of ink goop comes out on it my printer has no transfer paper setting but i tested it on transparencies and thin and neither worked. there's no problem with my settings im pretty sure PLZ HELP, :D

Question by Airsoft 007 Sniper 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


He mentions using a laser printer for copper etching, can I use my ink jet printer and get the same results? Answered

He mentions using a laser printer for copper etching, can I use my ink jet printer and get the same results?

Question by 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


How would i harden printer ink to stand up to lots of handling (on a plastic-type substance)?

Hello fellow instructable'r,I have been trying to make my own custom guitar picks and, so far, have been extremely surprised with my results. First, i wondered if it was possible for a guitar pick to even run through my printer (regular load in front, print to front) without jamming it. I found out that i could. Then, i tried printing a NIN (Nine Inch Nails) logo on it and it worked. My only problem is that i can't get the ink to dry and become durable enough to let me touch it and not take ink off/ make fingerprints on it. For now, i have put tape over the side i printed on, but is there any way that you know of that i can make the ink more permanent? I was thinking of maybe using clear coat spray or that clear top coat for nail polish. Just so you guys know, i used a yellow dunlop tortex .73mm pick.Thanks,-Nick

Topic by tubbychick3n 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Is there a way to use a Cannon Bubble Jet printer as a scanner? Make a scanner cartridge?

There is a model of Cannon printer where you can purchase a scanner cartridge to replace the ink cartridge, transforming the printer into a scanner.  However, I do not have that model, so I'm wondering/hoping that since THAT printer can be used as a scanner with only the simple replacement of the ink cartridge, maybe there's a way to use my current, ancient Bubble Jet as a scanner, also. Thanks in advance. 

Question by dianaaspenhill 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Transform a conventional ink-jet printer into a 8000$ laser etcher?

I believe everything is possible, with a little bit of help and that's what I need now. I can't build out those fancy CNC machine found here, since it's beyond my knowledge and skills. However, I thought about modifying a cheap ink-jet printer to make it into a DIY laser etcher this way: -Replace the ink part with a custom laser - instead of giving a current in order to flow ink, the laser will be powered. Laser requires different power level depending on the material, perhaps a potentiometer knob on the laser power supply could do it? -Remove any rolls and paper-only specification: instead, make THINGS able to go inside by simply destroying the printer, rising it up, and use the bottom paper rolls as the Y axis motorization. (The ink-jet head will be the X axis). Why would I do this? I have no idea how to programm small electronic chips, even less how to hook them up to computer or software. I, however, am able to print black and white images, and believe the black can simply be a signal to "laser on". I strongly believe this is possible. Since I can't, as stated above, mess with microcontrollers, I suggest adding potentiometers to the motors and laser and calibrate it myself, and adding physical marks (e.g: sharpie marks) to mark my settings. My question is: Do you think it is? What else could be required? Did I miss some obvious point that would render the previous idea totally worthless, and is this point solvable? Please comment :)

Question by matroska 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Inkjet printer question

I need help, making an ink jet printer think that there is paper in the loader when there is not, there is a small switch with a leaver which tells the printer that paper is going through the roller but if it is taped down then the rollers go for a while and then the printer realities that there is no paper, is there an easy way to fix this? Also on my ink cartridges there are 7 pins, does any one know what these do? I'm trying to build a laser cutter out of this printer where the laser is controlled by when the black ink would be spraying. Thanks in advance.

Topic by kcedgerton 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


What's the best kind of printer to buy for electronics development?

My ageing desk jet 610C is playing up, so thinking about getting a new printer. Was thinking of getting a used colour laser so that I can do toner transfer PCBs and print schematics. I guess the other option would be to keep the DJ and get a B&W laser for bulk printing and PCBs. Any ideas if the color laser would cost much to run?

Question by rparrygbr 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Extremely simple printed circuits

I was thinking of this theoretical circuit making system. I would get some sort of powdered or granular metal (possibly lead) and mix it with small amounts of water. Then I would fill the paste in an ink jet printer. Then I think it's as simple as just printing out the circuit. Maybe you would have to bake the print or maybe put it in a kiln to let the metal melt together.

Topic by Crash2108 12 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Idea on printer mod to contour painter.

I've been thinking about this for some time now. Over the years I've accumulated a lot of computer related junk and it's time to do something with it. I would like to take an ordinary ink jet printer and convert it into an automated painter, to be more precise it would be a HVLP spray painter for painting motorcycles, cars, houses, etc. Now the question is where do I start?

Topic by westgross 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Making a mini branding iron? Answered

I am considering making a mini branding iron (about 3/4" square) out of brass with my initial to brand my work.  I have some brass which I hope to transfer my initial on and then cut with a rotary tool. First I have to transfer the pattern,and thinking of using my ink jet printer and some acetone, and then proceeding to cut away with my rotary tool. Do anyone have any suggestions or tips?   Thanks

Question by WazIt 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


What laser do I need for laser etching?

The questions says it all; I am planning to build a custom 2-axis computer controller etching machine out of a modified ink-jet printer. The motorisation and computation part it not a problem yet, however I have no clue where to start from about looking for a laser. I am looking foward engraving/etching wood, metal, plastic and some other soft materials. I do not plan to CUT these however. I do not know what kind of laser I am exactly looking for, nor it's power or anything else I should be aware of, including where to order it from. Even, will a DVD burner diode do the job? If you have any past experience with laser etching, or laser technology, please contribute as I would be very grateful. Thank you.

Question by matroska 9 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


How to apply wet-slide decals?

Passing this question along for a friend: i have been experimenting with wet-slide decals, to do complex graphics, but can't figure out how to make them work. They are essentially a piece of thin plastic on paper backing. You print on them, using a printer, then immerse them in water to get the paper backing to come off. Then, you slide the decals onto whatever surface you have. finally, you use a softening agent, to get them to meld onto the surface without edges. i have spent 10+ hours, trying to make a 3"x2" decal. No dice. And none of the guides online have worked for me. I have a couple of problems: 1. can't get decal to not lose its proportions—i.e., stretches when i seat it 2. can't get print not to bleed (ink-jet version) or flake (laser version)—even when i use a fixative Also, if i try to cut decal to just dimensions of surface i am applying to, the edges tend to curl up and refuse to flatten out—without further causing 1 and 2 above.

Question by canida 8 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Instructables in the Telegraph -- Weird and wonderful inventions

The Telegraph ran a great article featuring online DIY culture and Instructables. Weird and wonderful inventions by Chris StevensMeet the DIY enthusiasts using the internet in their fight against throwaway society.The internet has spawned a new breed of extreme DIY enthusiasts. They build jet engines in their garages using instructions downloaded from forums, and they upload videos of the explosive results. They weld together rollercoasters out of scrap materials and household items. They teach themselves taxidermy to build "The Mouse Mouse", a real mouse with electrical innards. Or, like 17-year-old Thiago Olson, who built a fusion reactor in his house, they're scouting for parts in their local B & Q. The online DIYers are rebelling against a consumer society that has convinced many of us that everything is bought, not made. "It's a reaction against a mass-produced culture," says Eric Wilhelm, founder of Instructables.com. "People want to express themselves and show their individuality - building something cool that you can't buy and showing how you did it is a great way to express yourself."While the traditional DIYer is overjoyed to have put up a set of shelves without losing a finger, the extreme online DIYer spends the weekend with an angle-grinder turning a supermarket trolley into an armchair, or building a Guitar Hero game controller from scratch. Online projects show you how to make your own USB charger, extend the battery life of your laptop, or use a Mont Blanc refill to transform a £1 pen."People are passionate about all sorts of things," says Wilhelm. "From the wacky, far-out jet engines and taxidermy to the everyday stuff like how to tie your shoes or manage washing your laundry most efficiently."The projects are uploaded by users, who offer each other step-by-step advice on everything from the sinister to the charming. The extreme DIYers dare each other to create increasingly elaborate projects, posting photos and videos of near-misses and successes. The internet is perfect for this kind of experimentation; it's a place where inquisitive geeks meet friends with power-tools. All these projects have gorgeous colour photos to go with them, and the strength of interest in these extreme-DIY sites has led communities to meet offline. This year, Makezine.com held a fair in the US attended by 45,000 "makers"."Besides the skill of building and the exchange of ideas, it's a lot of fun," says Phillip Torrone, senior editor of Make magazine. "We seem to be in an era of thinking more about the things we buy, make, consume and cherish. The result of that is people making things - it's more gratifying." Scandals over rip-offs, such as the recent study that showed ink-jet printer cartridges wilfully waste more than 50 per cent of the ink (tinyurl.com/2957jw), make Torrone's DIY ethos all the more appealing.If you're the sort of clumsy oaf that regularly snaps USB keys off in their sockets, these DIY sites also offer advice on repairing consumer electronics. Wilhem's favourite DIY project is the dachshund wheelchair (tinyurl.com/ytc6bb). The DIYer who made it explains: "Our dachshund hurt his back, so for rehab we made him swim a lot, and I built this chair until he could use his back legs again."Online DIYers have an enthusiasm for science and exploration, and many are simply reacting to the low-quality of mass-produced goods, especially consumer electronics. They object to our modern throw-away culture. The DIYers also upstage technology manufacturers by demonstrating easy ways to fix what would otherwise be thrown away. "It's really more about problem-solving with more people", says Torrone.More news articles about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago