how long will a lemon battery last for?

Question by mb inventor 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


what is the maximum volts from a lemon battery using 1 lemon Answered

Question by mb inventor 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


How many Lemon batteries will it take to turn on a wii remote?

I'm making a lemon battery project for the science fair and I want to power a wiiremote with Lemon batteries, how many Lemon batteries will it take?

Question by ahmad2117 8 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


can i use carbon rod and copper in lemon battery?

Can i use carbon rod from dry battery and copper wire as electrode in lemon battery .if not wher can i get zinc metal other than dry battery.......

Question by rachit59 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Whould boiling lemon juice effect the ph level of the citric acid? Answered

And is there any way I could remove the sucrose? I want to as close to pure citric acid in the lemons.

Question by aaronscottaugustinhotmail.com 9 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


What kind of electrodes can I use in a lemon battery?

Dear Instructables community, recently I stumbled upon this instructable: https://www.instructables.com/id/The_micro_Lemon_Battery_reusable_1_hour_of_led_l/ and I immediatly recognised it as a nice way to spend an afternoon. Now here comes the question: Are there any alternatives for zinc? For instance this instructable: https://www.instructables.com/id/Salt-powered-LED-flower/ uses copper and aluminum foil, instead of copper and zinc. If the previous question is answered with no, then could someone please tell me where I can find zinc? I mean something like: break open this device, there will be some zink in there. If you feel like it then feel free to explain the principles behind electrochemistry to me. Always happy to learn something new. Thanks in advance, Dennis van Rooijen

Question by dunnos 9 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Cheap LED, Batteries and magnets

Hi, I want to make a whole bunch of lowtec-throwies, just a simple version to decorate and take pictures here, not the ultra-bright highly magnetic kind.The problem right now is that 200-300 throwies with cheap LEDs would cost more then $100 if I get the parts at our local electronic store (and that without magnets)."besthongkong" has 1000 LEDs for $10+$10S/H (=2 cents each) but does anyone know another cheap source with a larger variety and colors of low cost LEDs, maybee even low current ones? Maybee even in Europe?Second thing: Batteries. Lithium cells are rather pricey at that quantity, and cheap button cells seem to do the job.I had a couple of 1,6v LEDs on two button cells with diods I had lying arround (voltage drop). It was not very bright but they still glowed a week later.I had a cheap 12 pack assorted buttoncell blister, and I foundhttp://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.61But they seem to have even worse quality ;-) Idd probably have to use three or more and still throw some out.I remember an experiment using wire and coins, lemon juice or vinigar, which made a LED glow dimly. Any Idea how long before this DIY-Batery runs out?Third thing: Magnets!DX has 20 for less then $2. but I guess at that weight I could just magnatize some scrap metal and cut it into pieces. Thats about a third of the costs even with all the shipping :-)Anyone here that knows any other good site for LEDs, magnets and such that ship to europe?

Topic by schorhr 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


If I put lemon juice in one cup, ammonia in another would I have made a battery?

I couldn't fit all of this in the question box so PLEASE READ BEFORE COMMENTING. I read that acids put in water release H+ Ions and bases put in water release OH- Ions. If I put water proportionate to the amount of what I have in the cup, and added wires to connect to a circuit, would I have made a battery? P.S. The picture was made in MS Powerpoint for anyone who wanted to know.

Question by Super_Nerd 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


floppy disk/ iron oxide sheet use?

I saw the ipod charger using lemons here: http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/content/kitchenscience/exp/charging-ipods-with-lemons/ And I began to wonder what would happen if  you sandwiched a bunch of floppy disks together and put them in a solution... Hook them up in series and well what? Could each one be used as a tiny cel in a battery?  I am going to look around, I'm sure my colleagues are still hoarding floppies. I think I'm gonna need a lot of alligator clips on this one...Must be something a sufficient number of floppies can still do for us.

Topic by flashj 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


How do you concentrate citric acid? Answered

I'm making this thing, and I was wondering if concentrating the citric acid (from calamansi (Philippine lemon)) would increase output. My friend suggested boiling it, but is there any other easy way of concentrating it? If not, then let boil.... For the meantime I'll boil it to check if it works. If results come back positive, I'll delete this question. If results come back negative, I'll let this question float around instructables for a while. (Please do help me in putting this in the right category)

Question by nutsandbolts_64 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Green Science Fair Winners

Instructables and Discover Magazine are happy to announce the winners of the Discover Green Science Fair for a Better Planet Contest!We asked you to show us some great green ideas and you responded with a flood of them. Over 200 Instructables were submitted over the past few weeks and tons of useful information has been put out there to help others with their own green projects. You are all an inspiration, truly.Thank you for putting so much time and effort into these Instructables. As always, we wish we had more prizes to give out. Now, on with the winners! First 10 Entries For jumping into the contest early, the authors of these Instructables will receive a Discover Magazine t-shirt. Ways to be green How to get FREE 9 Volt Batteries Recycle plastic grocery bags into Loons! Tips on how to improve gas mileage All-Natural Incense Burner Science Fair Display Board How to recycle an old sweater How to Boycott the Bottle Easy Seed Starter Supercharged Lemon Runners-UpThe authors of these Instructables will each receive a copy of 20 Things You Didn't Know About Everything, a book from the Editors at Discover magazine. Mini Wooden Portable Compost Bin How to build a 72Volt electric motorcycle How to Make an Easy Inverted Planter £5 Japanese lamp from recycled materials Trickle charging auto-switching LED helmet Make your own plastic tote bag from recycled plastic bags From old Tourist Map to Gift Bag How to Make A Solar Powered Fan! solar lawn mower How To Smell Pollutants Third Prize The authors of these Instructables will each receive an Eton FR150 Microlink, a Solar-Powered, Crank-powered Portable Radio with Flashlight and Cell Phone Charger. Cheap solar tracker Organic planting pots from newspapers Bike Generator Recycled Denim Shopping Bag The Green Pail Retained Heat Cooker Second Prize The authors of these Instructables will each receive a Sansa Express 1GB MP3 player, Instructables Robot t-shirt, patch, and stickers. Solar Powered Trike Urban Homestead Garden (squarefoot gardening abridged) First Prize The author of this Instructable will receive a Celestron Skyscout that uses advanced GPS technology with point and click convenience to identify thousands of stars, planets, constellations and more. Plus Instructables Robot t-shirt, patch, and stickers. Make Your Own Biodiesel Processor Thank you to all of our judges for helping to choose the winners. Colin Bulthaup (CTO of Potenco, co-founder Squid Labs)Christy Canida (Instructables)Stephen Cass (Senior Editor at Discover Magazine) Saul Griffith (President of Makani Power, co-founder Squid Labs, MacArthur Fellow) Corwin Hardham (CTO of Makani Power, co-founder Squid Labs)Jeremy Jacquot (treehugger.com, USC student in environmental sciences) Tom Kostigen (co-author of The Green Book: The Everyday Guide to Saving the Planet One Simple Step at a Time)Ed Lewis (Instructables)Corey Powell (Executive Editor at Discover Magazine) Sarah Richardson (Senior Editor at Discover Magazine) Gemma Shusterman (Media Lab grad, Juror for the 2008 SIGGRAPH art gallery)Tyghe Trimble (News Editor at Discover Magazine)Eric Wilhelm (Instructables, co-founder Squid Labs) Daniel Wilson (Roboticist, author of How to Build a Robot Army) Laura Wright (Senior Editor of On Earth Magazine, published by the Natural Resources Defense Council)

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Mozzies and how to keep them outside....

Down here the winter was too short and not cold enough, meaning insect life is literally exploding in numbers already. The house I moved in has badly installed flyscreens on the doors and windows, most likely due to the fact that the house is moving up and down in several points... Anyway, due to the gaps everywhere I found myself with the problem that the mozzies covered my entire front and back door areas. With an unsupporting landlord not even allowing me to replace the bad flysreens with proper ones at my cost I was left with less invasive options to tackle the problem. Before you ask: No I am not even allowed to fix holes in the flyscreens covering the windows :( My next step was to check the local garden center for some natural solutions. Lemon grass seems to do the trick for the inside, the smell also keeps flies away really good. But I had to put the pots in the garden as the ongoing smell gives me headaches. It also did very little to prevent the mozzies from coming inside when I opened any outside door for a few moments. Only way out was to get rid of the mozzie population having daily meeting around my doors. At the local hardware store I found several "surface sprays" and they all stated to be very effective against cockroaches, spiders and other crawling insects - too bad I don't have a problem with them LOL After asking I was informed that those sprays do little to nothing for flying insects, including mozzies and that I would waste my money. During my next shopping trip I got desperate and grabbed a can of surface spray from Aldi. Was under 3 bucks, so I had nothing to loose compared to the 40-80 bucks for a canister of "the good stuff" from the hardware store. At the checkout an old lady asked if I moved into a new house with cockroaches when she saw the spray and I said that I only have a problem with mozzies. She recommended to eat more bananas ROFL Back home it was already too sunny at the front door for the mozzies to show up so I waited till the late afternoon and sure enough I found the area covered with them again. The spray annoyed them badly but I kept spraying all cracks, surfaces and also the gaps at the roof line. Kept checking for a while but could not see any real effect on the mozzies other than swarming around me and trying to suck my blood. Next morning I found the floor at the door covered by a carpet of dead mozzies! I don't mean a few, I am talking enough to take the brrom to clear them up :) Now for the past 5 days the body count is going down quite fast while my door stays free of mozzies. Still have them flying around in "normal" numbers but I can get in and out without a swarm of them following me. Since the product is plant based and considered to be without any side effects on humans or pets I will see how long it lasts and then just spray again - this three dollar can should last throughout the summer... You might wonder why I go through all these troubles... Long story short, I am quite allergic to the bites. Happened as a kid when during a warm summer night at a friends place I got so many bites that the doc gave up counting. He reached over 200 just by counting my head and face to the shoulders... Now I am allergic to the bites, the itch lasts over a week and thebite area swells up to the size of a 50 cent coin with blisters forming after 2 days. You might not get it hat bad but if you do suffer from the bites I found two remedies that help with the itch and reaction: a)  BBQ igniter (the manual push type without batteries)! They work like the expensive clickers you get at the pharmacy but last much longer - plus they require more force. The rounded tip is placed directly onto the bite and when you push the button in to "get shocked" two things happen. First the pressure forces the soliver that causes the reaction into deeper skin layers where there are less receptors for the itch. Secondly the high voltage breaks down certain parts of the soliver making it far less effective to cause harm. Downside is that you might like the shock in certain areas and that you should shock at least 10 to 15 times to get a real benefit from it. b)  Hydrogen Peroxide (3%) You put a drop of H2O2 directly onto the bite or for difficult areas use a soaked cotton bud. Rubbing it in with a cotton bud for a minute or two works best IMHO. You might see your skin turn white or feel a slight burn right where the bite is - that is normal and harmless. The hydrogen peroxide releases oxygen into the skin - this turns the skin white for short period of time. But the oxygen also breaks down the soliver and the byproducts of the body reaction to it. Works great for horse fly bites too. Downside here is that you should not overdo things and that you should test first how sensitive you are to the reaction. A good test is to apply it onto a small cut or scratch to clean it. If you tolerate that then won't even feel it on a mozzie bite. I hope some of this will help you through the summer ;)

Topic by Downunder35m 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago