how do i get manganese metal from manganese dioxide? Answered

Hello, I have a very large amount of manganese dioxide, which i wish to turn into manganese metal, however, i have a problem with reducing it with carbon, which is that i dont have a furnace, or even the materials for a makeshift one, as i found out all the bricks that are sold in this state, are all sand or cement, no clay, not even at the hardware store. I was wondering, if there is any way for me to get manganese metal other than reducing with carbon, such as electrolysis of manganese in some soluble form. thanks

Asked by oldmanbeefjerky 6 years ago


How to make silver manganese alloy?

 I would like to make an alloy of Silver & Manganese - Silver 84 - 86%, the remainder Manganese with other impurities max. of 0.15%. How do I go about this?

Asked by Hari001 8 years ago


All right, let's clear this up: What the hell is inside of a battery?

Really frustrating: I accidentally closed the tab I had been working on for about 15 minutes, so I'll probably be missing a couple of questions I had been meaning to ask.So anyway: When I peel off the outermost metal covering of a zinc-carbon battery, I'm just taking away a protective steel covering, right? When I get rid of that, am I looking at the actual zinc "case?"What is the sticky, black material that surrounds the graphite rod? Is that manganese dioxide? Is manganese dioxide the same thing manganese oxide?Further outwards from the center of the battery, there is another black substance. Is this ammonium chloride?I haven't actually chopped open a carbon-zinc battery all the way yet. Is there a good technique for removing all of the contents?How can I tell the difference between the two black substances? Is the moist, black paste ammonium chloride? If this is so, then why, when I pull the graphite rod out of the battery, is it sometimes coated with a sticky, black substance? Do the substances mix with each other or are both substances sticky and black? Is one a powder?Is it okay to drill through one end of the battery? If I drill into the negative terminal of the battery, what will fall out?Basically, what are the physical properties of all the materials? How can I tell the difference between them?Now: On to alkaline batteries...Both types (carbon-zinc and alkaline) appear to use manganese dioxide. Is this so? On Wikipedia's article on alkaline batteries, manganese dioxide is described as Zn/MnO2, with the two as a sub-script. Does the slash mark mean that zinc and manganese dioxide are interchangeable?What will I find if I open up an alkaline battery? Is it safe to do so? What is a good, safe way to open one up?Are there any particular "fun" applications for these chemicals? Think explodiness ; )I've heard that manganese dioxide can be used to produce oxygen. How do I do this?There might be some yellow tag-box notes on these, pictures. For the context, visit my Instructable on how to make your own carbon arc light. I'm not trying to advertise, I'm just anticipating someone asking about them.

Posted by carbon 11 years ago


How do I collect the oxygen from the reaction of hydrogen peroxide and manganese dioxide?

I believe that the reaction between the black, powdery manganese dioxide found within carbon-zinc batteries, and household-variety hydrogen peroxide produces oxygen. However, it is my understanding that oxygen is heavier than air, and will therefore that collecting the gas will not be as simple a matter as seen in steven07's Instructable on producing and collecting hydrogen.Unless I'm completely wrong, and a reaction that produces oxygen will inflate the balloon. :POr, does anyone else have another way of collecting the gas?

Posted by carbon 11 years ago


Camera/Battery Mystery

I'm trying to solve a mystery with an old camera of mine(a kidak cx 7330). It showed a low battery indicator with a fresh set of batteries, as well as some older ones-so i assumed it was broken. Once i had it replaced (which was overdue anyway, its like, 5 years old), i popped in a set of rechargables which i got with the new camera, and it worked. i tried with another, not so fresh pair of energizers ... and it worked too.  (all batteries are AA- i prefer cameras that use em, since they arn't toyishly small) Having gotten myself confused, i checked the voltages on all 3 sets of batteries. The fresh set was manganese, and 1.7v. The rechargables (nimh) were 1.4V and the not so fresh pair of energizers(alkaline) was 1.6 v and both worked. I'm wondering (other than what the hell is going on), if electronics have some kinda overvoltage protection, and if that was what was triggering off the issues, and if i ran down the manganese batteries to 1.6v or below, i could use them - that way i'd just use em for something high drain, and switch to them once its done.

Posted by faileas 8 years ago


Sodium Chlorate production other ways?

Sodium chlorate production without the need of keeping the solution at around 50-70°C from  the electrical power used for electrolysis?  sodium chlorate production besides having to heat from amperage the sodium chloride solution and electrolysis then would a catalysis to help with oxygenating the solution like instead of water use 3% hydrogen peroxide or manganese dioxide or ever ammonium nitrate and yield sodium chlorate using electralysis with out needing to keep the solution at 50-70°C? 

Asked by symboom 8 years ago


how does pine and willow charcoal differ from plain old random tree charcoal when used in pyrotechnics? Answered

hello, i am starting up an online store, and am already starting to sell some of my pyrotechnic supplies, such as manganese dioxide and charcoal, but i just realised, on ebay (my online store is not an ebay store), people are only ever selling pine charcoal or willow charcoal! which doesnt make much sense since is a super fine powder and is made up of carbon. i need to know what makes these so much different from regular random tree charcoal that comes from just anywhere, and, is the charcoal i have now, which is of unknown origin, but mostly of from pine-like trees in the tropics, the same? i need to know if it makes any difference since i dont want angry customers demanding refunds because it isnt as good as other charcoal!

Asked by oldmanbeefjerky 7 years ago


Chemicals people would want to make?

Basically I want to know what lab chemicals you want to make, if you know how to make any useful chemicals. please post, I am not responsible for and injury's, fatality's, or "bad things" of any sort that come from this thread, all things posted here are to assumed for informational purposes only.

Posted by mr.space 9 years ago


Anyone savvy with Air Electrodes??? Thanks! =)

I'm posting this after having googled, of course...I work with DIY fuel cells using off the wall fuels. By far, the most expensive component of my FCs is the Air Electrode which I purchase from Electric Fuel Ltd. in Israel. The material was invented in 2008 (as far as I know) and EF were the ones who bought the patent (according to the inventor himself...sorry but his name eludes me). Anyhow, I was wondering if anyone knows how to make good air electrodes. Something that would give me at least a vold in reference to the SHE (V=0) and a current density of up to a few hundred mA/aq cm...The stuff is basically this, from the electrolyte side to the air side: Separator paper, Carbon powder with Manganese or Cobalt catalyst mixed in (and a binder of some sort, I suppose), a Nickel mesh (current collector) and a bit more Carbon+catalyst then a microporous Teflon(r) sheet (permeable to gases but not to liquids). I cant find nickel mesh where I live but the other stuff I could get--the Teflon(r) being replaceable with oil paper??? Any help would be greatly appreciated. N.B: I am Not trying to infringe on a patent, just trying to make some "homebrew" air electrodes for R&D since I am still (steam comes out of ears) self-funded and low on funding...lol. Thanks a lot!!! =)

Asked by gizander 8 years ago


White particles in water?

Ok, this is now driving me crazy. When I pour a glass (empty glass, no ice yet) of water (filtered, old filter) the water is clear. Pour over ice and big puffy white flakes appear. At first, I think that there must be crap in my ice. So I buy a silicone ice cube tray and use filtered water to make ice cubes. Second iteration: filtered water over filtered ice. Results: BIG FLUFFY WHITE FLAKES. So, that didn't work. My next thought was that maybe I messed up with the ice cubes. So, I switched to distilled water for the ice cubes. Third iteration: filtered water over distilled water ice cubes. Results: BIG FLUFFY WHITE FLAKES. Again I found myself with nasty debris floating in my water. What's next? Oh, maybe it's the detergent I used to wash my glasses. So, I wash a glass by hand with Dawn soap. Fourth iteration: filtered water over distilled water ice cubes. Results: you guessed it... BIG FLUFFY ****** WHITE FLAKES. Gotta say, it makes me want to pull out my hair! I just don't get it. So, here's my question: what's causing the white flakes? I read somewhere that cold temperatures can cause certain salts (not table salt) to precipitate out of solution. This can also be the case with Magnesium and Manganese. Does anyone else have a solution? I just want to drink some nice clear water. I thought for sure a Brita filter would do it for me.

Asked by kakashibatosi 3 years ago