Metro Smart Watch

I had an idea the other day whilst playing Metro: 2033, I imagined a smart watch made like Artyoms watch but instead of having an LED come on when you're visible, having an LED linked to your phone that comes on when you have a message like an external notification light and wondered if there's any way to make this a reality?

Question by Haffnium 10 months ago


game metro 2033

does anyone know if there coming out with metro 2034? and did bioshock 2 have a crappy ending or is it just me.

Topic by pyro=fire 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Help in Metro 2033 bug?

In Metro 2033 I have already found many game stoping bugs, but I have overtook them, either by experimentation or using the Internet. But I have now reached Armory station and I have encountered yet another bug: After getting cuffed by the reds and starting to run I am always caught by the first soldier even before reaching the first turn of the hallway. After a lot of failed trials I decided to search the internet for solutions. I found nothing but "you have to run" Which I do and "you must lower your resolution" something that I can't becouse the game is already playing at the lowest resolution possible. What should I do?

Question by tgferreira184 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Metro 2033 Light Sensor

I'm working on a Metro 2033 cosplay costume and being the gadget-geek I am I'd like to make a working copy of the light sensor Artyom carries on his wrist. For anyone who haven't played the game (or read the book, I bought it today but I don't know it he's got the same thing there) it's basically just three LED:s (red, yellow, green) that light up depending on how well illuminated you are (red=fully illuminated=people will see you instantly and shoot, yellow=partly illuminated=people will see you unless you take cover, green=as good as invisible unless you give away your position with noise or flashlight). In the game it's abut the size of a 9v battery but flatter and for simplicity I'd like to keep it like that; I don't fancy carrying around an Arduino or something like that on my wrist. Here's a picture: http://bi.gazeta.pl/im/5/7534/z7534645X,Metro-2033.jpg So, my question is: Is it possible to make something like that small and simple enough to be stuck to a wristband?

Topic by Jur 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Recycled Ticket Art

Japan takes reusing materials to the next level: a 10 x 7 mural, entirely out of old Metro tickets. Just goes to show that you can always find a use for things a second time around (or maybe a third, fourth, you name it).LinkIf you like this mural, it's not the first of its kind. In 2007, employees of a Japanese department store created their own art gallery out of Metro tickets. Check it out here

Topic by joshf 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


To All People In The Greater/Metro Vancouver Area

Let's do something... epic.....Sometime in the next 3 months (to be announced), I want to see everyone that looks at this topic to show up at a location in the Vancouver area (to be announced-yes, another thing), with as many throwies and floaties as you want to bring (preferably over 20, as we will release them onto the city sometime at night (t.b.a. - wow, this isn't very organized). If you're looking for parts, Active Tech (1st and Boundary in Vancouver) has the cheapest LEDs, in $15 100 packs. Batteries you can get from dollar stores. The point of this is to have a a little fun, and to annoy the horsemen.Let me know your ideas on a time and location.LN

Topic by lucidn 11 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Can you get Internet Explorer for a Blackberry Tour 9630 thats flashed for Metro PCS?

Well, I want to start downloading apps for my Blackberry Tour, from App World that is. However whenever I go to download any app there is a page that shows up and it says, "This webpage uses ActiveX controls that work only in Microsoft Internet Explorer. To ensure that Blackberry App World is correctly downloaded to your Blackberry, this site is not designed to work wih any other Internet Browsers. If you cannot use Internet Explorer, you may be able to download the software directly to your Blackberry smartphone". And theres no download link or anything there to help me out. I have also already tried to change my browser options/configurations from Metro PCS to something else like IE. But there are no other options other than MetroPCS. So, please, if you know how, or if you think you can help do so. Thanks a plenty, Alex8171

Question by DELETED_Alex8171 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Rice Paddy Art

Somewhere in between crop circles and intricate corn mazes is this rice paddy art, in which different colors of rice are planted in strategic locations to make patterns. The Japanese are masters of creating art in the least likely of places--see metro ticket art.Link

Topic by joshf 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


i have to do industrial traininghow can i do it..............hepl plz?

I am an engineering student and time comes when i have 2 do industrial training but i don't know what is the procedure for apply for training

Question by 53anshul 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Build an Electric Car

Want to convert your car to all-electric on the cheap?  Check out bennelson's awesome Instructable, Build your own Electric Car!  Ben walks you through the steps of converting a Geo Metro (purchase price $500, gas-requiring parts sold for $550) to run on a forklift motor and 6 12V batteries.   According to his calculations, the car gets the equivalent of about 130 mpg.  Not bad for an entirely self-taught mechanic! Check out the video of his converted Metro going up hills: Sounds easy, right?  So when are you planning to convert your car or truck? This post has been sponsored by Pepsi. The Pepsi Refresh Project celebrates the people, businesses, and non-profits with ideas that will have a positive effect on our world.

Topic by canida 9 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Looking for Electrical Engineer

The company I work for is looking for a full-time in-house creative EE. We design products for commercial and consumer applications.Here is our website:Griswold EngineeringWe need one innovative Electrical Engineer with experience programming electronics, as well as designing boards and circuits.Metro-Detroit area.Contact me if interested.

Topic by whiteoakart 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


how to make apps for cell phones? Then how to sell them to people?

I would like to learn how to create apps or games for cell phones like the iphone or metro pcs ect. where do I start? what type of program do I need? How do I sell them?

Question by take1ads 9 years ago


i want to make a combine metrocop costume can someone tell me how to do some of these parts for it?

So i want to make this costume. but i want to use a foam to shape the mask and parts of the chest, then i also would apreiciate some advice on the stun stick.  be sure to check the pics

Question by DehLeprechaun 8 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


How can I sort of INCREASE the RANGE (power to get signal indoors) of my FM radio?

Though I purchased my FM radio in a Metro (where FM signals are quite strong), now I am living in an sub-urben are and so unable to recieve good signals. Is there a way out?

Question by ariesamit01 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


for the pinoys out there, where can i buy fabric glue in metro manila? thank you for the help..

I live in meycauayan but working in Q.C. i need a fabric glue for my crafts that i will be doing.. i cant start without it but i dont know where to find one.. Much better if it would be places like malls.. Thank you very much in advance

Question by jemahsimbulan 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


If I hook the 12 v motor from a car air compressor to a crank and the wires to a battery, will I have a hand generator?

I know you'd need diodes, but would I be able to charge a 12 volt battery with something like this (kinda like in that videogame Metro 2033 where you have a hand powered generator- coolest thing ever)?

Question by Funk_D 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Where can I get an old uesable computer ready to be discarded - Springfield, Va.?

I am a senior citizen and a Army veteran (Vietnam) in the metro DC area and am in need of a functional computer.  Is there anyone out there planning on sending one to the recycle unit?  If so, I could use it! If not a total system of monitor, keyboad and processor, any single component will do to start (e.g., keyboard or processor or monitor).

Question by chuckljns 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


WTF?!? Caves For Sale On Ebay!

Well, this is big news for cavemen! There are caves for sale on ebay! Click HereCave owner Steve Rush, 49, is auctioning off the Mystic Caverns in the hills of Ozark Mountains on eBay. The 28-acre property in Arkansas includes a gift shop and three caves, two of which are safe enough for visitors.The bidding starts at $899,900 (£568,000), cut from Rush's original asking price of $1.2 million.Rush bought the property near Harrison in 1988 and began giving tours in 1992 to the two accessible caves, Mystic cavern and the Crystal Dome cavern.I found all of this information on metro here: Cave for sale, one careful ownerThis is really amazing, I wonder who is going to win the auction?

Topic by Plasmana 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Willoughby & Baltic - Boston Area Maker Community

Willoughby & BalticWe make wonderful things.Willoughby & Baltic is a community organization of people who make stuff. Among our ranks are artists, engineers, writers, teachers, and everything in-between. In fact, everyone in W&B; is all of those things to some degree - and more.We exist to provide our members what they need to create. Primarily, that involves having comfortable, usable space and an extensive arsenal of tools and equipment available. But with W&B;, our members also get a strong, positive community who love to learn new things, teach what they know, and provide unending creative energy. It's a group of people who can appreciate what it takes to bring a project to life, and who can bring new and unexpected perspectives to the tough problems we inevitably encounter.We are located in Somerville, MA near Davis Square and the Red Line subway stop. We are convenient to Cambridge, Boston and the greater metro area.We currently have a Hackerspace with darkroom, silkscreen studio and computer lab, a model fab for smaller projects, and a larger fabrication space with metal and woodworking tools. Please check us out at willoughbybaltic.comYou can read more at the Boston GlobeThese photos are a sample of what our full Fabrication Space near Union Square has to offer.

Topic by waaronw 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


XinCheJian participation at The Great Global Hackerspace Challenge

XinCheJian (http://xinchejian.com), the first Hackerspace in China, is one of the 30 Hackerspaces across the globe that have been selected to participate in the Great Global Hackerspace Challenge (GGHC) competition. The objective of the competition is to create an electronics build that will make a real and positive difference in an educational establishment. The competition runs for six weeks, from Monday March 21st to April 30th 2011. The winning project is evaluated on the following: How reproducible is the final project? How easily can the parts be sourced in locations around the world? How low cost is the final output? How well are the plans documented? How relevant is the project to helping education today? How inventive and creative is the design and build of the project? The selection of our participation proposal includes a 5900 RMB (US$900) budget in electronic components (including the required microcontroller and portable power source) generously provided by element14.com. Every Hackerspace that completes their project receives 10 soldering setups while the three semi-finalist Hackerspaces will each receive over 13000 RMB (US$2000) worth of electronic tools. The Hackerspace with the winning project gets a Tektronix MSO2024 oscilloscope worth over 36000 RMB (around US$5,600)! As an extra incentive, semi-finalists will be invited at the California Maker Faire 2011. To address the objectives of the competition, XinCheJian will focus on getting elementary and/or high school students acquainted with the intellectual processes of cooperative problem solving with out-of-the-box thinking. This will translate into an interactive and intelligent educational toy that stimulates students into a variety of challenging experiences. Want to join or help our team? Contact us at: gghc@xinchejian.com. To reach the competition organizers, contact hackerspace@element14.com. About the competition: http://www.element14.com/community/groups/the-great-global-hackerspace-challenge About XinCheJian (http://xinchejian.com): this Hackerspace serves as a beacon of free spirited and unhibited creation, both artistic and technological, to serve people that hunger for intellectual and economic advancement. It is a community of westerners and Chinese, young and old, experienced or not, artistic or cartesian. The Hackerspace location is at Shanghai AnHua Road Number 76, Suite 301 in the Changning district, metro line 2 or 11 at the Jiangsu Rd Stop Exit No.4. 

Topic by xinchejian 8 years ago


Float Your Boat Challenge

<br /> [BCITSA YouTube Chanel] Recently, the BCIT Student Association (BCITSA) hosted a 2-day 'Float Your Boat' competition for the Marine Engineering Students at the Marine Campus in North Vancouver. Contestants were supplied with ‘surprise’ materials to construct their vessels with; materials included plastic garbage bags, popsicle sticks, bamboo skewers, aluminum foil, string, plastic party cups and tape. Teams of 2-3 were given an hour to become acquainted with the surprise materials, then design and construct a sea-worthy vessel. Boats were then raced in heats on the indoor pool, using human-powered fans for wind, to determine who had the fastest time. Prizes were awarded for: Fastest Boat, Most Creative Team and Best Overall Design, all donated by local businesses. I attended just to check out the scene, but the event was also covered by local news media and has since been broadcast on stations in Metro Vancouver, as well as printed publications. Pretty awesome for a low-budget student association! And there's more, the BCITSA has a history of hosting awesome events for students, such as: 3rd Annual Flying Extravaganza, where students at the Aerospace Campus in Richmond, BC "construct planes from everyday office supplies, with the winners chosen based on the distance they can safely land their lego pilots. Additional prizes go to those with best design and best crash." CTV News coverage (youtube video) Engineering Week, hosted at the BCIT Main Campus in Burnaby, BC, where electronic, mechanical and civil engineers compete in tower building, catapult destruction and racing CO2 powered cars, all made from everyday office supplies. As well as the competition Engineering Students brought along projects they have been working on to share with their fellow students, there was even a real live Angry Birds game being played. CityTV News coverage (youtube video) Facebook photos Aside from a much needed break from studies, challenges like these put on by the BCITSA pushes students use creative solutions learned in class with hands-on problem solving, turning academics into tangible results.

Topic by mikeasaurus 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


For Sale Brand New Apple iphone 16gb for $200usd

GLOBAL LIMITED,We have established a mature and flexible operation mode and won full support and confidence of customers with passionate and quick service, high reputation and efficient collaboration. All products have got top quality and aftersales service commitment from Metro Wise and guaranteed customers satisfaction. We can provide various electronics product, all the product we will be supply the best quality and the competitive price. Now, We have possessed comprehensive worldwide customer groups. If you are interested in any of the products we deal with, please feel free to contact us. We can prepare samples incase you requires. Our principle"SAFETY+ QUALITY+FAST DELIVERY+ GOOD PRICE PERMANENT CUSTOMER". For further information, feel free to contact us. Booking Emails: globalltd@ommail.com salesdept@CHEV.NET warehousemanager@rock.com View of our company items in Stock: Nokia N96 16gb ...............$300 Nokia N78 ....................$250 Nokia Vertu Pink Ascent LimitedEdition...... $250 Ipod Touch 32gb...............$250 iPod Touch 16GB................$150 Playstation 3 80gb.....................$200 Apple iphone 16gb ......................$200 Sidekick LX ..............................$130 Sony XPERIA X1........................$250 Nokia 7900 Prism.................$220 Nokia 8800 Sapphire Arte ........$250 HTC TOUCH DIAMOND..............$250 Blackberry 9000.............................$250 Asus P750 ...................$300 Apple iPhone 4GB.............. $140 Apple iPhone 8GB.............. $180 HTC Touch Cruise............$220 HTC Shift...................$300 HTC Touch 3D view - 360° spin...........$350 HTC P4550 TyTN II PDA SmartPhone ........$200 HTC P4550 TyTN II (Kaiser) PDA SmartPhone.....$250 HTC Advantage X7500 PDA SmartPhone.......$250 Nokia 7900 Prism.................$220 Nokia 8800 Sapphire Arte ........$250 Nokia E90 ...................$200 NoKIA N95 8GB ...............$200 NOKIA N95.....................US$180 NOKIA N93i.....................US$150 NOKIA N92......................US$120 NOKIA N91 ...................US$110 NOKIA N90....................US$100 BlackBerry Curve 8320 ..........$200 BlackBerry Curve 8310 .........$200 BlackBerry 8820 ...............$180 BlackBerry 8830 World Edition .........$200 Dell Laptops Dell Inspiron 9300..................US$280 Dell Xps m1710......................US$250 Dell Xpsm2010.......................US$350 Technics SL-1200MK2.................$600 Technics SL-DZ 1200..................$300 Technics SL-1210M5G Pro Turntable.. .$350 Technics SL-1210MK2 Turntable ........$150 Technics SL-1210MK5 Pro Turntable ...$250 We are looking forward for your co operation. Booking Emails: globalltd@ommail.com salesdept@CHEV.NET warehousemanager@rock.com Announcer: Sales Dept

Topic by global01 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


McMADSAT make and do, show and tell. Scotland's first Maker Event 2009. Full report

Report of the McMADSAT event 14th March 2009, at the Glasgow Science CentreWe had a fantastic day. Outside it was a grey gale of a day, but inside was a riot of colour and activity. The aim was to enthuse the public with the fun of making things from a variety of technologies. Anyone who wanted to, could join in, make something and take it away with them, and all for free. Hundreds of people of all ages came along and had a great time. A general video of the event can be seen at https://www.instructables.com/community/Mc_MADSAT/ (Thanks to Les Oates for making this excellent film for us).I am happy to discuss further with anyone planning their own event, and you can see more about it and the process by which I got the event going, at http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com/ExhibitorsStar Guest, all the way from London, was Professor Maelstromme (AKA Amanda Scrivener), who brought her beautiful creationsWhat can you make from a dead umbrella? Display of the possibilities for reusing the fabric and structure of dead umbrellas.The Tea Party. 1950s style tea party made from a combination of hand made fabric and edible pieces.Cardboard structures from the students of the department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde.Greensteam's steampunkery, 101 uses for a dead keyboard and other examples of her work as shown on Instructables.The Offline Mechanical Blog – a very old manual typewriter with continuous paper available for the public to type their messages and thoughts on for all to shareLemonie (another Instructables enthusiast, who travelled up from York especially) brought his amazing conversion of a VHS player-into-toaster that makes toast with VHS imprinted in it. He also brought his nice LEGO USB stick, a lantern made out of a tin-can & glass. and his *untested* wind-turbine, made from VHS player parts.On the Young Makers stand we had a display of virtuoso Lego constructions and an extensive collection of home made Steampunkery.The self-replicating machine from the department of Design Manufacture and Engineering Management at the University of Strathclyde, the Reprap, was on display and moving but sadly not reproducing on the day.ActivitiesThe public were offered a wide range of free hands-on activities, which ran continuously all day, to 'Make and Take'Soldering - make a solar theremin (or a robot). 16 of these were made and all worked first time. Some were taken for a trial run in the sun and a video of this can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzUZMon3vpA The Stemnet ambassadors helped visitors to make their own Musical Straw Oboes.One of the most popular activities – especially with children – the Stemnet ambassadors supervised the making of many handsfull of Gloop.The Stemnet ambassadors used the plastic Polymorph for visitors to make a fingerprint keyring to take away.Fishy things - Busy Bees Art studio provided painting and collage fishes to make, particularly for our very young visitors.The Glasgow Crocheted Coral Reef invited visitors to try their hands at crocheting and contribute to the growing coral reef, all made from wool and even strips of plastic bag. Many total novices not only tried their hands but actually completed a piece of coral to contribute to the reef. This workshop area was very busy throughout, with visitors typically spending 30 minutes or more participating. Many thanks to my civil engineer pal who ran this.House of Cards - visitors could make and take their own set of the design classic 'Eames cards', which slot together to form fantastical structures. Ideal for recycling old greetings cards.Cable necklets, keyboard bracelets and keyboard film wallets. All made from recycled/repurposed materials from dead keyboards. Popular with adults and children alike.Risk assessments were provided to the Glasgow science centre, for all the activities. There were no injuries and the 'emergency first aid bucket of water' was not needed as there were no soldering or gluegun burns.Participant Presenters30 people were involved on the day, either as exhibitors or as workshop facilitators. An essential component of the team was the group of11 Stemnet ambassadors, most of whom were there all day. It would have been impossible to run so many activities without them. Another group in the team was the members of the Glasgow Electron Club who, with some friends and a Stemnet ambassador, ran the soldering workshops continuously all day. We were particularly fortunate to have two exhibitors travel up specially to take part. Several exhibitors were entrepreneurs who gave their time for nothing, even though the venue rules meant they could not sell anything, nor charge for the activities being provided. This was especially generous given the harsh financial climate just now. Everyone said they had lots of fun.PublicOver 1,000 people visited the Glasgow Science Centre on the day. The BSA/NSEW assessment forms collected only represent <10% of the visitors to the McMADSAT area. Stallholders and workshop facilitators estimated a total of about 425 active participants (people who did an activity, or asked questions and generally interacted with the displays) by 1530 (GSC shuts at 1700). However, even these only represent a proportion of the people visiting the event which, although not recorded, probably amount to about double that, since most of the activities were taken up by children accompanied by other family members. The numbers at any given time were variable, depending upon the GSC's own activities/talks etc. I would estimate that the McMADSAT area was visited by at least 700-800 during the day. From the few assessment forms returned, and from chatting to the public, it was clear that most had come simply because they were coming to the GSC anyway, but some (mainly young adults) had come as a result of internet and email information or because of the Metro article. The GSC visitors seem to be mainly families with children of primary school age. The University of Glasgow Steampunk Society had come especially to make contact with the steampunk element, as featured in the Metro article. We also collected some contact details for future events. BudgetThe total budget for the event was the £500 grant provided from NSEW Scotland scheme. This had to cover all the exhibitors' costs and the costs for the free make and take activities, plus all publicity etc.In-Kind Sponsors:The Glasgow Science Centre provided free space, tables, cloths, technical assistance, without which the event would not have been possible at all.The publishers of Make and Craft magazines, O'Reilly's, did not feel able to sponsor us in the same extent as they did for the much larger event in Newcastle on the same day, but did send boxes of back issues of their magazines to give away, which probably amounted to an equivalent of about £300 at UK newsstand prices.Clockworkrobot.com provided more theremin kits than contracted for, which were themselves at cost price.Madlabs provided free batteries for all the kits they supplied at cost.Instructables.com assisted with publicity and allowed the use of their logo.VenueNone of this would have been possible at all, particularly on this minimal budget, without the kindness of the Glasgow Science Centre. The Director agreed immediately to offer us the space free, plus the use of tables and technical help to enable this event to take place. We were able to partially set up the night before which was very helpful in avoiding a scramble on the day. We were able to get the loan of 4 GSC soldering irons which avoided us having to get personal ones PAT tested. This was the ideal venue for us as it meant we really didn’t have to do a great deal of publicity as we could be sure of an audience from the GSC's normal throughput.PublicityThe event was listed in the NSEW diary and in the university of Strathclyde's NSEW information. Posters were distributed around venues in Glasgow and information posted on relevant websites. A blogspace http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com was set up as a temporary web presence to refer people to. The Metro published a small piece which was a wonderful boost.Lessons for the futureNeeded more helpers and more exhibitors. Outdoor displays would have been impossible as the weather was dreadful, but it is still necessary to have some more dramatic displays as well as the hands on activities. Successful soldering for novices really needs 1:1 or 1:2 supervision. The budget only worked because minimal publicity was done at low cost and all the participant presenters were generous with their time and resources. Anything more ambitious than what was done on this occasion would need a larger organising team and significant sponsorship.

Topic by greensteam 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


China's first Maker Faire !

April 6th was a long night that would be followed by an even longer day. Hours stretched like taffy as the Airplane pulled me across time zones. I was on my way to the Shenzhen Maker Faire which was being put on by Eric Pan, the founder of one of the largest open sourced businesses I know. Eric is a visionary, and his vision to inspire more makers in China connecting them with a global maker movement through the concepts of openness, sharing, and innovation inspires me and hundreds others to come to Shenzhen to share in the first Maker Faire in China! Hours ago I was at Instructables cooking my Last Breakfast for the office and gaving my Last Hugs. Qarly, my new friend, had helped my stay up all night organizing my tickets and suitcase. She went with me to the Payless shoe store on her bike as I walked barefoot. Yes, I started my journey shoeless. I had traded in my Vibrams at REI for a large backpack so I could cram as many arduinos and 3D printers into it as possible before leaving to go spread the good words. Here are the good words as I see them right now: "It Can Be Done." Yes, with a solid mission, a relentless attitude and accepting being shoeless (or jobless, or hungry, or ...) it's possible to accomplish the things you dream. Boom, back in that tin can flying over the Pacific. My schedule starts with a trip to Hong Kong to meet up with instructable's member Prank. Alex Hornstein and I had recently completed an adventure in 3D printing called the Pocket Factory in which we traveled across America seeking the business models behind low cost 3D manufacturing. He is now back in east Asia being the revolutionary philosopher engineer he is. I land at 8pm and head out into the city of the future. Hong Kong is a city of millions, beautifully lit tall buildings, zippy public transportation, and the largest pay inequality in the world. Looking out the window I keep wondering if this is the rich part, or the poor. Then I was there. I made it to IFC - a gigantic mall in the heart of Hong Kong. The metro stop inside it is called "Hong Kong Station". Yep, shopping is big here. We hung out on the roof of IFC talking projects. Without giving too much away too soon let's just say Alex is on his way to revolutionize the micro solar industry. We took the familiar ferry route home and I spent the night organizing and updating the social world since I knew in a few hours I'd be in China... and in China, no one can hear you tweet. Before I knew it I had to be off! It was 6:20am (HK time) and the ferry leaves at 6:40, I had a long day ahead of me and I haven't slept yet. Holy crap! I ran and got right back on that ferry from Lama to the mainland. Passing all the tall buildings once again and rushed onto the MTR. As we sped along the Hong Kong landscape of tall towers slowly turned into green rolling hills and the people on the train spoke less and less english. I crossed the border into Shenzhen and it was there I met Ani, the Monk. What a beautiful lady! We had a great conversation involving LOTS of smiling, drawing and almost no words. She was from Hong Kong and we were now friends. We traded bracelets and now I have one more reason to learn Mandarin! I finally made it all the way to Xi Xiang, the metro stop which was walking distance to the Maker Faire! I was getting pretty excited, I had lugged all this stuff across the world, and finally I was going to meet the makers of China! After a long and potholed walk I finally made it to the gate where a nice young Chinese lady helped me carry my stuff, we walked down a long outdoor hallways at F518 the "First Experiential Sharing Space in China" which was filled with sculptures and art. Billboards around me advertised hip hop dance classes and robots peeped from the windows. I knew I was in the right place. Right near the entrence of the Maker Faire was a strange robot. It was the size of a small house and it served books. They have robot libraries in Shenzhen. Wow! The more I learn about this place the cooler it seems! The faire is a large three story space with a media space on the first floor where people can buy "chinese make" a magazine called Radio that has been teaching people how to make stuff since 1955. The publishers of this magazine are also the ones who do the translation for Makezine! The second floor is filled with long tables of makers, a huge hall filled with running robots, dancing droids, DIY laser 3D scanners, touchless IR interfaces, octocopter (no, not tacocopter) and all the awesome stuff you'd expect to see in San Francisco, except this is Shenzhen. There are makers everywhere! Upstairs there are people making clay figurines, another instructables user - Star - runs a workshop around Canidu (yes, you can do!), her company which makes an electronics learning tool. This movement is obviously global and the Shenzhen Maker Faire has pulled makers not only from all over China, but all over the world. Eric Pan, the founder of Seeed Studio employs 70 people through an open source project and through this faire has inspired hundreds. At the after party, you can really tell how proud Eric was to have brought amazing makers like Mitch Altman and David Li from the Shanghai hackerspace together. Eric has a new project in the works right now. He's soon to be a father! I can only imagine how proud he will be when baby Eric Pan picks up his first blinky LED kit. Now that's some serious making! +Bilal Ghalib PS. Eric in the last picture is not dead, only extremely exhausted!

Topic by lamedust 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


You're a foreign AIR. How much is the $1.500 stipend in San Francisco?

So you want to be the next Instructables Artist in Residence? That’s awesome! Being on Instructables was one of the best experiences of my life (if you read my final blog post, you already know that). The only bad part is when you have to say goodbye. But, even if you manage to get over the after-Instructables broken heart (good luck with that), you have to be careful about the risks of a broken wallet, too. Yesterday, a fantastic author from another country asked me if the $1.500 stipend was enough for living in such an expensive city as San Francisco. Honestly, I’m not the best money adviser, but as a Colombian who was living five and a half months in the Bay, I want to share with you my experience with the economical part. Despite I had an awesome AIR program coordinator (Noah Weinstein), the help of my friends Alisson Sombredero and Jennifer Hansen, and all the Internet for investigating, there are some things you can only learn by yourself, at your risk. So, let’s suppose you are a foreign artist, from the middle class of your country, with a normal job, who wants to travel to the amazing Pier 9. What kind of things you have to keep in mind? NOTE: I’m not an official spokesman from Autodesk. And some things can change from now until you read this post. So, if you have any doubt about the AIR program or need some help, ask the Instructables AIR Program Coordinator. 1. Plan ahead: The AIR program is a very tempting opportunity, and probably you want to be in Pier 9 RIGHT NOW! But think: what is the best moment for you to be in San Francisco? How much time will you stay? Do you have any savings? Will your parents support this amazing opportunity? Do you have any responsibilities that affect your decision (a steady job, girlfriend, spouse, children)? What will you do when the AIR ends and you have to return to your country? Do you have any debts? How is your English? Do you have emergency contacts on the city? When I took the decision of being part of the AIR program, it was October of 2012, for starting March 2013, with a duration of three months (at the beginning) so I had 5 months to prepare myself for the travel. So, you have to think: how much time do you need for preparing your travel? 2. Your stipend: You will receive US$1.500 monthly. With good planning and some restrictions, you can have a good time with that money. Autodesk pays the materials and tools for your projects. But remember: the AIR program doesn’t cover air tickets, visa paperwork, health insurance, taxes and other extraordinary expenses. It’s all on you. Besides, it’s a stipend, not a salary. Be careful with those words when you talk with a migratory authority. A salary implies a work contract and work visa, and you aren’t an employee, but a vendor who probably will enter to the United States using a B1 Visa (Business/Tourism), with a stipend for covering housing, food and transportation expenses. So, don’t use the words “salary” and “work”. Use “stipend”, “invited”, and “artist in residence”. Instructables helped me with an invitation letter explaining to Migration what kind of activities I would do on the AIR. Autodesk is very prompt with stipend payments, but there is not an exact date for paydays. It’s between the first and second week of every month, but it can varies. So, at least the first two or three weeks of your time in SF are on you. And you have to eat, transport, pay your rent and deposit, and so on. Think between $2.000 and $2.500. 3. Housing: You will need to rent a room and to share the house with somebody else. And getting an economic and good room is a very complicated mission in San Francisco. Especially if you will stay only for 1 to 3 months (landlords prefer long term tenants). The best site to find a room is Craiglist. However, everybody can post on that site, so be prepared to find some bizarre stuff… Before you go, Google Maps is a mandatory tab in your browser. It’s a good idea to know the area. Every time you see a room offer, look how far is from Pier 9 in San Francisco. Keep in mind something: San Francisco is just a city from a big area named “San Francisco Bay Area”. In the Bay Area you will find a lot of cities and towns like Oakland, Berkeley, San Jose, South San Francisco, San Mateo, Redwood City, Concord, San Leandro, etc. A lot of people live on the nearest towns and take public transportation to San Francisco. Don’t forget to investigate if the neighborhood of the room offer is a good area to stay. If you can’t get a room before you arrive to San Francisco, think about a hostel for the first days, meanwhile you find one. (But just for the first days). Or you can try couchsurfing. Don’t trust in the $80/night hotels on Mission, because you can find a very creepy experience. Back to the room for rent: Try to get a furnished room, or you will have to buy at least, a mattress (and you can’t take it home at the end). If you are good cooking, having a kitchen will help you to save money. When you get the room, most of the landlords ask you to pay the first month plus the deposit. The deposit is some kind of backup money for the landlord, in case you break something, damage something or don’t pay your rent. At the end, the landlord must return your money. Consider it some kind of saving. But be careful: try to have a written contract, always ask for a receipt of every money you give, show to your landlord the fails of your room (take pictures just in case), and don’t break anything. My experience: my first three months, I lived in Treasure Island (in the middle of the Bay Bridge. Believe it or not, it’s part of the city of San Francisco). Good neighborhood, old room, furnished, $625/month, $600 deposit (so, my first payment when I moved was $1.225), creepy landlord (if somebody named Israel offers you a room on Treasure Island, it doesn’t matter how nice he sounds, basically… RUN!) Next two months: I lived in Oakland (passing the Bay Bridge). Beautiful house, fantastic landlords, good neighborhood. $600/month, $500 deposit. The farther the house is from San Francisco, the better and cheaper will be the room. My recommendation: try to get something in San Francisco. All the fun is in that city! I loved Treasure Island, but probably you can find a better neighborhood. If you get a room in another town, you will have always to think how you can return to home if you are going to have some night fun. Maybe it’s more expensive, but you have to consider carefully the next point. 4. Transport: You will find these ways for commuting: • MUNI: This bus and metro system are exclusive for the city of San Francisco. $2 per ticket, but you can use the same ticket in the lapse described on it, or all night long. It works 24 hours. • BART: Bay Area Rapid Transport. This metro communicates San Francisco with the nearest cities and the SFO Airport, and it’s a quick way to travel inside the city. According to the distance, you will have to pay. If you get a room in the east bay area, think in more or less $3.65 per ride. And it doesn’t work in the middle of the night. • AC Transport: Bus in the East Bay Area. $2.10 if you are travelling inside Oakland, $4.20 if you need to cross the Bay Bridge to go to San Francisco. • FERRY: I never used it. I leave you that mystery. • CALTRAIN: This train communicates San Francisco with the farthest towns in the Bay Area. More expensive. Think in $8 per ride. • CARPOOLING: It works only at week mornings. In a marked point, a driver picks up two or three passengers for using the Fastrak (more economic toll to pay). Most of the time is free, but the driver can ask you for one dollar tip. Very economic and fast, only if you din't mind to take up a strange car with other two or three strangers. You can manage all of the public transportation options using something called Clipper Card. Avoid the taxi cabs. They are very expensive! My recommendation: If you live in San Francisco, MUNI is the cheapest, safest and best way to travel. You can get an Adult Muni-only Pass for only $66 and for that month, you can travel all you want inside San Francisco. You can get it in any Walgreens. Or you can try getting a bike. Living in another city implies you have to organize a logistic plan for your transportation, including: BART, MUNI, bike, AC bus, carpooling, Caltrain, Ferry, free shuttles, and thinking like Cinderella every time you are invited to a party in San Francisco. I prefer to pay an $800 room in San Francisco and $66 in transport, than a $600 room in Oakland and $300 in transport. Here is a recommendation from Canida: There is a bike share in SF. For $88/year, you can borrow a bike for as many 30-minute trips as you like. Exists a bike stand directly across the street from Pier 9. More info here. 5. Food: If you can buy groceries and make your own food, awesome! You can find microwaves on Pier 9. In my case, it was cereal with milk and fruit at morning, sandwiches at night, and lunch on the food trucks near Pier 9. Think in an average of $11 per lunch or dinner, depending of the place and if you want to add a soda or a dessert. McDonald’s and Burger King aren’t good options. You can find some good Chinese lunches and Safeway’s specials for less than $8. Remember: the prices showed on the menu don't include the tax. My weekly budget for groceries (for breakfast and dinner) was $30. 6. Cash: Ok, there’s some delicate point in this talk, and probably one of the only things for improving in the awesome AIR program: your monthly stipend probably will be paid in a $1.500 Rewards Card. The good news: a rewards card is very useful! You can buy on Internet, you can carry a lot of money on this single card, you can use it as a debit/credit card, and you can pay with the card in most of restaurants, food trucks and stores. The bad news: you still need cash for some things (especially for paying the rent). And there is no simple way for changing your electronic money for cash. You can’t do withdrawals in an ATM or bank, you can’t consign that money to an account, you can’t do international transfers, you can’t pay debts and you can’t get cash back when you buy stuff. Besides, some places require a minimal bought if you want to use the card, or charge an extra amount. And probably you will have to spend all the rewards card money before returning to your home country. So, be prepared. Luckily, I found an awesome person (I won’t say her name because everybody will ask her for that kind of help) who changed some of my cards for cash, so I could defend myself. 7. Shopping: You will need (or want) to buy extra stuff: personal care, towels, blankets, clothes, gifts, etc. The best places are Target (Mission St. at 4th) and Ross (Market St. at 4th). You will find some good sales, but remember: the excess baggage can be a headache when you have to return to your hometown, and airlines charges for that, $200 at least. 8. Communications: I got a good plan for my smartphone on T-Mobile: for $50/month, unlimited minutes, messages and data. Maybe you can get a better plan in another cellphones company. You will need specially the data. Believe me, in U.S., nobody does anything without consulting Internet first. 9. Tips: Tipping is very important in U.S. I’m not telling you have to give a tip in every place (you are in a personal “war economy”, after all), but there are a lot of situations where you definitively have to leave a tip, between 15% and 20% of the bill. And don't forget: you are in San Francisco, so you have to visit some cool places! Some attractions are free. Others, (like Alcatraz) are between $20 and $30. Maybe more, if you want the star treatment. Don't take a guided tour into the city. With enough planning, you can go to the best places with less money. Maybe it looks like too many troubles and considerations, but we are talking about moving to another country for at least one month. And remember, this awesome company will pay you for making whatever you want to build, using their out-of-this-world tools like 3D printers, lasercutters, waterjets and CNC machines, and giving you the materials. It's a fantastic opportunity you will love forever!!!!

Topic by M.C. Langer 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago