Nanotube Radio

Nanotube Radio: Supplementary materialsK. Jensen, J. Weldon, H. Garcia, and A. ZettlDepartment of Physics, University of California at BerkeleyCenter of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems, University of California at BerkeleyMaterials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryBerkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A.We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver, orders-of-magnitude smaller than any previous radio, from a single carbon nanotube. The single nanotube serves, at once, as all major components of a radio: antenna, tuner, amplifier, and demodulator. Moreover, the antenna and tuner are implemented in a radically different manner than traditional radios, receiving signals via high frequency mechanical vibrations of the nanotube rather than through traditional electrical means. We have already used the nanotube radio to receive and play music from FM radio transmissions such as Layla by Eric Clapton (Derek and the Dominos) and the Beach Boy's Good Vibrations. The nanotube radio's extremely small size could enable radical new applications such as radio controlled devices small enough to exist in the human bloodstream, or simply smaller, cheaper, and more efficient wireless devices such as cellular phones....This is the site of the original article

Topic by Goodhart 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Kickstarter Space Engineer creates "real" Mithril

This is very, very cool. There's a Kickstarter project working on  space elevators, using carbon nanotube (CNT) technologies.  One of the supporters asked if they could buy enough CNT to make a pair of wedding rings, because they would outlast both gold and diamond. It turns out that, to be able to make a CNT wedding ring, you need the ability to build a space elevator. They found a compromise, though, and made a brand new material - they alloyed CNT with silver; A metallurgist with 25 years in the field has said that the new alloy has some “interesting” properties. There is a strange ‘crystallization’ to the metal once it cools. We don’t really know why; or what this means. It needs study. There is other ‘stuff’ about this alloy which lead in some exciting directions, but as yet, we have not explored those. In essence we’ve created a unique silver+carbon nanotube alloy. We would like to brand this material “Mithril” after J.R.R. Tolkien’s super-material in the Lord of the Rings… so far, the foundation’s branding people have not returned our calls. (According to their website, it’s an 8 week process.) For a long time during the design and creation of the rings, their existence was a secret.  Now, though, the groom has given these reasons for buying a pair of Mithril rings; Reason #1 - Use this line when you propose, "Many men promise their brides-to-be the stars. It's a very rare man that actually delivers." At which point you can explain the ring, and the potential bride is thusly wowed. Reason #2 - It REALLY shows that you're planning on a better world for your children - aka, you're awesome husband material. Reason #3 - Awesome conversation piece. Reason #4 - Someone shows off their gold ring, and you can say, "How quaint." Reason #5 - The working name for the metal is awesome. I won't say more without Michael's permission. But let's just say, the name is very... enchanting. When the people who see you hear what metal your ring is made of, they'll do a double-take and then demand more information. Reason #6 - There are very interesting properties to these rings that are fun to show off. Again, not going to go into detail without Michael's go ahead. Reason #7 - It's one thing to give a wedding ring to your loved one. It's a completely different thing to give a wedding ring to your loved one that's a piece of history. Reason #8 - Gold wears away easily, these rings may be able to be passed onto your great great grandkids. The full story is on the Liftport site,

Topic by Kiteman 6 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Nanotube Tech Transforms CO2 Into Fuel

What do we think about this?http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2009/03/23/carbon-dioxide-fuel.html

Topic by SolarFlower_org 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


I'm trying to read ACS publications, what institution should I include?

What institution should I include for my library recommendation? Is it alright to put my old college? http://pubs.acs.org/action/recommendation?seriesCode=nalefd

Question by Vorenus 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


12-year-old designs advanced 3D solar cell

From Slashdot:12-year-old William Yuan's invention of a highly-efficient, three-dimensional nanotube solar cell for visible and ultraviolet light has won him an award and a $25,000 scholarship from the Davidson Institute for Talent Development. "Current solar cells are flat and can only absorb visible light" Yuan said. 'I came up with an innovative solar cell that absorbs both visible and UV light. My project focused on finding the optimum solar cell to further increase the light absorption and efficiency and design a nanotube for light-electricity conversion efficiency."Much about his young man is eerily similar to many participants here on Instuctables...SlashdotBeaverton Valley Times storyKatu.com story

Topic by gmoon 10 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Where do you go to find multi-disciplinary reference material in engineering?

I read this article about the conductivity of carbon nanotubes, and I had the most awesome dream about a space elevator. In the dream it had 2 cables instead of one, and just ran the current through the cables. Anyway, I was sure someone else would have thought of that, so I checked for some reference material. There was a decent wikipedia article which brought up a question. How does current flow affect the yield strength of a material?

Question by Vorenus 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Paper Batteries

Has anyone read anything about the up and coming Paper (thin) batteries ? Paper Batteries: A paper battery is a flexible, ultra-thin energy storage and production device formed by combining carbon nanotubes with a conventional sheet of cellulose-based paper.A paper battery acts as both a high-energy battery and supercapacitor, combining two components that are separate in traditional electronics. This combination allows the battery to provide both long-term, steady power production and bursts of energy. Non-toxic, flexible paper batteries have the potential to power the next generation of electronics, medical devices and hybrid vehicles, allowing for radical new designs and medical technologies.What do you think? Will it replace these monsters one day?

Topic by Goodhart 11 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Wire Glue, Solder Free Fun.

Well, I'm not very good at soldering, for one simple reason, I've not done alot of it since my school days.This kind of solution is perfect for someone like me, who often only needs a simple led circuit to hook up inside a prop.It would save me having to get the soldering iron out, and could easily be an advantage when getting circuits into strange shapes.Carbon is one of our favorite elements. It makes diamonds, it makes all known life possible, and it makes pencils (and who doesn't love pencils?) Also, it seems that carbon fullerenes (buckeyballs, nanotubes, etc) are going to do a lot in our future. Time to bring a little of that microcarbon goodness into your home and make it work for you now. "Wire Glue" Conductive Glue uses microcarbon technology to make a glue that also conducts electricity.Via Thinkgeek

Topic by gmjhowe 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


By toothbrush to the stars!

A concept known as a space elevator has been "doing the rounds" as a cheap way into orbital space for several decades now.Basically, a cable of some description is anchored to an orbiting mass, and vehicles climb up and down the cable to transport materials and passengers to and from orbital space cheaply and easily (in any space journey, the most expensive and dangerous parts of the journey are the first and last few kilometres).There are, technologically speaking, two main hurdles - the cable, and the vehicles.Carbon nanotube composites are a strong contender for the cable, but travelling up and down the cable takes power. Rockets are out of the question (what would be the point of the cable?). The hours, possibly days, of the journey make batteries unfeasible, and the turbulence of the atmosphere precludes the use of PV panels large enough to power the vehicles from daylight.That leaves transmitted power.So far, the transmission ideas have been electromagnetic - lasers aimed at smaller PV panels on the underside of the vehicles, or microwaves aimed at receiver dishes.Now, a new proposal suggests transmitting the energy mechanically.European Space Agency ground station engineer Dr Riise ... proposed sending power mechanically - effectively by providing a carefully timed jerk of the cable at its base.To demonstrate, he employed a broomstick to represent the cable held in tension, and an electric sander to provide a rhythmic vibration to the bottom of the stick.Around the broomstick's circumference he tied three brushes representing the climber with their bristles pointing downwards - meaning it took slightly more force to lower the brush assembly than to raise it.The vibration from the sander allowed the assembly to slide upward along the broomstick as it moved slightly downward, but grip it as it moved slightly upward. The net effect: the assembly rose against gravity straight to the top of the stick. That's a bristlebot (or vibrobot)! Dr Riise, though, calls it a longitudinal wave climber or LWC.It sounds easy enough to replicate the demonstration model, although I can't imagine how you would efficiently vibrate a 36,000km cable (I have images of damaging harmonics getting set up as the moving carriages change the effective length of the vibrating part of the cable, and shaking important bits off the vehicles).Apparently, though, the idea is being looked at by lift manufacturers for installation in the next generation of super skyscrapers.Demonstration videoBBC story

Topic by Kiteman 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago