Puff pastry prebaked.

I want to bake a quich and have purchase a puff pastry pie shell. Need I prebake the shell, in order to guarantee a crispy bottom part of the crust??? - bri <3

Topic by brianmorin 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


What is Your Favorite Pastry

Hey people ever had a favorite pastry well how about name one and see if other people like the same one you do or give people new ideas to try new pastry delights.

Topic by D.L.H. 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Halloween Pastry Contest on Serious Eats

Serious Eats has teamed up with Pepperidge Farms to host a "Halloween baking challenge featuring Puff Pastry." The grand prize winner will travel to Serious Eats headquarters in New York City for a pastry crawl. (why am I only now learning about pastry crawls??) The winner will also score a 5.5 quart stand mixer from Cuisinart and some great baking gear from Pepperidge Farm. So check it out! The contest ends October 15.  Just upload your entry to the Photograzing section of Serious Eats, and get inspired while your there. Have a great idea but not the resources to enter?  Leave your ideas in the comments, and someone just may pick it up!

Topic by scoochmaroo 6 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Are there any Greeks on instructables?

Hi, Could someone help me out with a nice little instructable on how to make the Greek pastry called Bougatsa? I really enjoyed it during my holiday and would like to prepare it at home. I really liked the sweet kind : Bougatsa Krema. so are there any Greeks on instructables who are willing to share their grandmother's secret recipe? Thanks!

Topic by bjvdb 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


what fillings can i put in a simple pasty?

I am using shortcrust pastry like the outside of a cornish pasty but i want to make a traditional pasty with a twist ,what can i fill it with

Question by endeavourkid 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Quiches in a fan oven. Pastry base remains raw. Answered

I have recently moved from conventional oven to fan oven. The pastry bases come out raw. I use a glass baking dish and set the oven on multi-function, i.e. all elements ad fan on. Advice please.

Question by johnmus3 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


This is hilarious...

Sing to the tune of sexy back.I'm bringing pastry back.Yeah.When I transport it I like to wear a hat.Why?I not to sure, but it don't look wack.word.Where we going to hide this to protect from attack?hmmm.take it to the fridge.cos' this pastry.uh huh.will make the casing of a tasty piea haa.I let you have some if you let me bake.ok.because I can't read this recipe.you suck!Look out for the walrus!Now. Watch this.http://www.weebls-stuff.com/wab/pastry/

Topic by mg0930mg 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Definition to qualify for Pie Contest

Hi there,I unfortunately don't really understand the definition to qualify for the Pie Contest:"your pie must have a traditional pastry OR no-bake crust to qualify"So either I bake it, or I don't bake it, but what else could I do to get a pie which wouldn't be allowed to enter? Greetings, bine

Question by sun. 6 weeks ago  |  last reply 6 weeks ago


farmers market tent awning

Hello, I'm spending all of my money for product, I bake pastries, but when the sun starts to go down, or up depending on which side of the street I'm on, I could really use awning I could put up myself.  Make myself. Any ideas. I just don't want them to poke anyone in the eye. I could really use ideas,  thank you sooooo much.  

Topic by EvaS4 4 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


what the heck is polenta?!

I'm lookn at this recipe for polenta orange cake, and its (suprise suprise) asking for 1/2 a cup of polenta. my pals say it mexican, but my gals tell me it french. google yeilds little, and wiki says it some sort of dutch pastry, what im trying to get at is WHAT IS POLENTA. but more importantly im down in ft. hood texas, where can i find it (killeed, harker heights)

Topic by Jumpin Jehosaphat 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


US vs UK flour

Curious observation from my mother's recent 3 months in the USA, she says she is unable to bake well when she was in the USA. Now, given mum is a pretty amazing baker on this side of the pond,  I am wondering why that might happen ? I wondered if  its "American flour", as opposed to "UK flour" - the recipe, would be the same kind of things, memorised over the years, like a simple scone, fairycakes, pastry.  Her main complaint was that items didn't brown, even at the same oven temperatures as she uses here, and after repeated experiments with the same recipes.

Topic by steveastrouk 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 months ago


Summer: the time of fresh fruit

Summer is almost here in the Northern Hemisphere, and school is out (at least where I live).  All the beautiful trees will soon be producing wonderfully sweet fruits for human and non-human passers-by to gorge themselves on.  With Pears, Apples, Plums, Peaches, Cherries and more, immeasurable numbers of fruit tree species are out there.  What are all of your favorite fruits, and what do you do with them?  Do you eat them raw and whole, in a pastry, jellied, dried, or some other way? Personally, I think Plums fresh from the tree take the cake, but all fruits are delicious.

Topic by tincanz 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


On the Origin Of The Universe (or at least our part of it...)

In the course of a conversation in the chatroom, I triggered myself to go look up old RFC's. I found http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc-sidx1.html . It's kind of like stumbling across Moses' chicken-scrawled first drafts of Genesis...A couple of selected quotes,From RFC-6 (A Conversation with Bob Kahn), "BB&N; is prepared to convert 6, 7, 8, or 9 bit character codes into 8-bit ASCII for transmission and convert again upon assembly at the destination IMP." So ASCII was not a standard data protocol yet.From RFC-82 (Network Meeting Notes), "ARPA will not pay for the coffee and pastry being served, so please chip in to help me pay for it."[Edit 23 Jul 2009: Fixed URL above to eliminate spurious period.]

Topic by kelseymh 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Pie Contest Winners

Instructables is happy to announce the winners of the Pie Contest!Dozens of tasty pies were submitted and many different pie-making methods were shown. After all of the pies were submitted, six winners were determined solely by user votes and one was selected by Instructables staff. Even though other pies may not have won a prize, several are worth checking out on the contest page.For all those who entered, and those who wanted to enter, we will be having more cooking contests in the future so stay tuned. There will be more chances to show off your skills in the kitchen.And now, on with the winners!UPDATED: One new winner to reward original content. Second Prize The authors of these Instructables will each receive an Instructables Robot t-shirt. Perfect Peach Pie Pretzel Pie Homemade Strawberry Rhubarb pie Delicious Apple Pie Stix Book Prize The authors of these Instructables will each receive a hardcover copy of The Pie and Pastry Bible and an Instructables Robot t-shirt. Top Votes Judges Prize How To Make A Vampie by thegirlwithacurl Cheesecake by hitokiri_808 Blueberry And Apricot Pie In A Skillet!! by Forkable

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


A New, Global Oil Quandary: Costly Fuel Means Costly Calories - Peak cooking oil?

The interconnectedness of the world can sometime be striking. I noticed yesterday that Safeway, a west coast grocery store chain, has converted it trucks to biodiesel. Due to increased fuel-demand for things that were previously only considered foodstuffs, the cooking oils carried by the biodiesel-fueled trucks were probably significantly more expensive. In Malaysia, this has even idled some plants design to refine oils into biodiesel:Here on Malaysia's eastern shore, a series of 45-foot-high green and gray storage tanks connect to a labyrinth of yellow and silver pipes. The gleaming new refinery has the capacity to turn 116,000 tons a year of palm oil into 110,000 tons of a fuel called biodiesel, as well as valuable byproducts like glycerin. Mission Biofuels, an Australian company, finished the refinery last month and is working on an even larger factory next door at the base of a jungle hillside.But prices have spiked so much that the company cannot cover all its costs and has idled the finished refinery while looking for a new strategy, such as asking a biodiesel buyer to pay a price linked to palm oil costs, and someday switching from palm oil to jatropha, a roadside weed.from the NYT article A New, Global Oil Quandary: Costly Fuel Means Costly CaloriesAnd there's more: as more and more baked goods eliminate trans-fats, those fats are often replaced with palm oil, so the pastries carried by the biodiesel-fueled trucks are themselves consuming more edible oil. While this will increase the price to make and ship a snack cake in the US, it has much greater effect elsewhere. Since people in the developing world get such a large percentage of their calories from cooking oil, increased prices have caused riots:No category of food prices has risen as quickly this winter as so-called edible oils -- with sometimes tragic results. When a Carrefour store in Chongqing, China, announced a limited-time cooking oil promotion in November, a stampede of would-be buyers left 3 people dead and 31 injured.

Topic by ewilhelm 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


HOORAY! MIT!

So I'm a bit late getting around to this, but last week I pretty much had the best pi day ever. MIT, being who they are, celebrated pi day by releasing admission decisions on pi day. This year, since it's the class of '15, they posted them at exactly 9:26pm (3/14, '15, 9:26). The entire day seemed to inch by soo slowly... the suspense killed me. Having been deferred from early action, I didn't want to be too hopeful, but how can you not be? MIT was my number one, but it was a complete reach. So at 9 that night, I was with some friends celebrating pi day (and preemptively celebrating our MIT rejection/acceptance.) By the time 9:26 came around... the servers had been DDoS'd. How anti-climatic... :P 15 minutes later of constant refreshing on my phone, and I finally got a page with text. For those of you who haven't had the experience, many colleges post decisions online: you can't gauge your acceptance on the size of the envelope anymore. Instead, you stare at a letter on the screen for 30 seconds, frantically skimming for some key word that reveals the answer. My jaw dropped as soon as I realized it. There was a moment of disbelief, however; I quickly tried to read as much as possible to make sure I understood correctly. I GOT IN! What followed was a blur, comprised mostly of frantic congrats, high-fives, hugs, texts, calls, facebook updates, and pi-themed-cupcakes-in-the-face. (blasphemous pastries, I know)  WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! I did, however, completely forget to post the news HERE! I know I haven't participated much in the community in the last few years, but before that, Instructables was huge in getting me interested in everything. There's just way too many awesome people doing awesome things. Heck, when I met Muffin, and saw him get into MIT, I had no idea that in 3 years we'd be starting a company together.  So yeah. I've been really excited recently. There are so many ideas I've wanted to instructablize recently... but haven't really had the time. (The time machine doesn't work that well yet either). Although I haven't posted or commented, I've still been lurking a bit :-) [img]

Topic by zachninme 8 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Fun Facts about Pi Day

The Pi Day Pie Contest is open until March 31st. Share a pie recipe to win a stand mixer. There's even a special judge's prize for the best pi-themed decoration. This year's Pi Day is special, because it's Pi Day ALL MONTH LONG. The third month of the fourteenth year (3/14) lasts for the duration of March, and it won't happen again for another hundred years. So get baking! Some miscellaneous Pi facts: (1) Pi is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. Pie is a baked dish made of sweet or savory filling wrapped in pastry dough. They are often, but not always, circular. Expressed in terms of pie, π is the ratio of the diameter of the pan to the length of the crust. (2) Pi didn’t always have a name, much less a sweet Greek letter of its own. Contemporary use of the π symbol is thanks to mathematician William Jones, who in 1706 proposed using the letter p to indicate perimeter. Leonhard Euler, the same guy who brought you functional notation in the form of f(x), popularized π by including it in his work around 1737. Euler is responsible for many of the letters that bedevil beginning algebra students: i for the square root of -1, e for the base of the natural logarithm, and much of the notation for trigonometric functions. There is a Wikipedia page devoted to the list of things named after him, and it is enough to make an English major blanche in terror. (3) Pi Day is officially a thing, at least in the United States. In 2009, House Resolution 224 officially recognized Pi Day as a holiday on March 14th. Presumably as a kick in the pants for the education system, not as a literal example of political pork. Resolved, That the House of Representatives-- (1) supports the designation of a `Pi Day' and its celebration around the world; (2) recognizes the continuing importance of National Science Foundation's math and science education programs; and (3) encourages schools and educators to observe the day with appropriate activities that teach students about Pi and engage them about the study of mathematics. (4) Pi is vaguely described in 1 Kings 7:23-26 in the King James version of the Bible. Solomon's pool should probably have been 31.4 cubits around, but he deserves some credit for getting pretty dang close. (5) Pie Day is on January 23rd, according to the American Pie Council, but they're still cool with celebrating Pi Day with pies.

Topic by wilgubeast 5 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago