Help! photos, diagrams, etc required for Himmelstürmer

hello, I need some diagrams or sketches or photos of the german Himmelstürmer. If you have scale or measurements, that would be even better. one sounds like a simple enough device, and I would like to make it as a fun project. and post it up as an ible. all I know is that it consisted of two pulse jets and fuel tank(s). one small jet pointed down and was attached to the front of the user, the other larger one pointed at a downwards angle. fuel was stored on the front of the person. the engines did not run long enough to heat up, so there is no heat protection. it was used by throttling the engines, which would push the wearer into the air and forwards, allowing jumps of 60 meters distance and up to 50 feet height. I just need details of the, well, the entire device. the attached picture is just an artist impression of the device. I have no idea how to mount it to the user in a non-permanent way, and I need dimensions and such to allow it to be safe. I really don't want to make a device for an ible that could blow up the user. Thanks!

Topic by Nyanman 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Contests; they are getting a bit confusing

I am a bit confused...I got the distinct impression that a photo contest was a photo contest, not a 'best instructable' contest; hence the camera as a prize. Almost every contest has been based on the subject matter (and that makes sense); submit a new i'ble on how to make a better cake and win a kitchen device; submit a new i'ble on a good way to use LEDs and win a product that helps make things with LEDs easier. Therefore (for some odd reason) I thought the object of this last I MADE IT photo contest was to enter a really good (possibly award winning) photo of something you built (rather than enter an average photo of something really good). Don't get me wrong, all of the instructables entered are good, but submitted as award-winning photos...not hardly. Was this just another popularity contest? How did I miss the mark here?

Topic by Disc Dog 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


help with custom psp themes? Answered

Hi everybody. recently, i went online and got a psp xmb icon editor (sorta thing) heres the english manual: http://www.pspsonywallpaper.com/psp-xmb-custom-theme.pdf the problem is, that i cant get any custom icons into it! it always gives me a error message saying that im using the incorrect file type. i have tried to make these png or tga icons in multiple image manipulation programs, such as: GIMP 2.6, photo impression 4, icofx, mspaint and dxtbmp. the only thing i havent tried is the thing mentioned in the manual: adobe photoshop. i dont have the money to buy it, and there are no free versions i know of. how can i get this to work? someone PLEASE HELP!

Question by zack247 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Timemachine in Google Earth - Concept Extention for Google Earth

Google Earth History After the Google Earth Software was published on the Internet and became a striking success, I noticed that this software made many basic features available, which were necessary for an idea I have carried around with me for a couple of years. Actually, the idea is connected to a question that many of us have asked ourselves: You are walking on 5th Avenue in New York and wondering how this street looked 20, 50 or 100 years ago. Of course you can look up photos in relevant books or magazines and obtain a certain impression of how life was at a certain point in time in this place. But wouldn’t it be great to be able to transform this impression and create a detailed picture; to be able to literally see more and truly visualize your impression? In addition to the one or two photos which can be found in old magazines or in history books, there must be other historical documentation, which can assist in creating the picture. Surely, you can look at movie documentation, but mostly the specific place that you are interested in, is only briefly shown – or not shown at all. So let us stick with the example of 5th Avenue, New York. A place which has existed for more almost 100 years in its current form; which means something to almost every person in the western world; and which has been visited by a vast number of people at least once. As tourists like to do, they photograph the places they visit to show family and friends, where they have been. It is safe to assume that 5th Avenue is one of the places on Earth, which is most incessantly photographed by a large number of people. What a pity that all these photos are brought back to their owners’ home countries, and thus spread all over the world. The final resting place of these photos is mostly a photo album, a dusty box in the attic, or - in this digital age – a hard disk or a CD-Rom. The sum of all these photos of 5th Avenue would probably form a breathtaking historical view of this street: millions of pictures documenting all small and large changes throughout decades, pictures of well-known people visiting the avenue, events which happened here, the rise and the deterioration of different buildings. This collection of documents resembles traveling back in time in a way, that nobody has ever done before. If the owners of all photos would run their pictures through a scanner or make already digitalized photos available to the general public, you would quickly obtain an unusual diversity of photo documents. Especially, you would gain a multitude of different pictures of well-known places like the implied 5th Avenue. Once more we’ll look at an example: assuming I have a color photo from September 1994 taken on the corner of 5th Avenue and 23rd Street in New York City on which you can see e.g. the Empire State Building. I scan the photo into my computer and use the appropriate import function from Google Earth. Thus, the scan of my photograph is saved on a Google server. With the 3-D view of my Google Earth program I can now head for the corner of 5th Avenue and 23rd Street. On the exact location, where I took my picture in the real world in 1994, I now save the photo in the program’s virtual space. If many other Google Earth users would do the same thing with their photos, we would slowly have a collection of pictures from 5th Avenue. All other users now have the possibility of viewing all saved photos. So, if another user saves a photo of 5th Avenue and 28th Street, all I will have to do is to virtually move five streets north and position myself behind the digitally stored picture in order to view it. Of course, we would soon have chaotic conditions if enough people upload their pictures of 5th Avenue to the Google server: One has a photo from December 1980, another person a photo from June 1982, the third a very recent photo from 2006. All these photos will be saved geographically correct in the Google Earth program, but content-wise they will not fit together at all in such a chronologically un-sorted manner. Therefore, the program Google Earth would have to contain a new function: the depiction of the fourth dimension, time. In short, before you save a picture from June 1971 in the correct virtual place in Google Earth, you will also have to set the correct time, i.e. June 1971. In reverse, for the viewer this means that he will have to select from which time in history, he wants to see photos of the chosen 3-D surroundings, before he views the pictures in the Google Earth 3-D world. So, what is it all for? Just as Wikipedia to this day has proven very impressively, that the accumulation of individual persons’ knowledge on the Internet in sum constitutes a high value of total knowledge, so this collection would form a library of historical documents. Again we will remain with the 5th Avenue example: with a sufficiently large collection of photos the viewer has the option of looking at the street from different perspectives AND from different points in time, which may even be many years apart. History has probably never bee so easy to observe. In the end maybe he sees himself taking his photo in September 1994 while somebody other shot a photo with me in the picture. Strange, isn´t it?

Topic by joho123 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Man builds amazing 1:40 scale LEGO Battleship + VIDEO !!

A Japanese man called Jun Brick has finished building a 1:40 scale replica model of the Japanese battleship "Yamato" .. out of LEGOOver 100,000 LEGO bricks were used in the construction !Back in 2007 Jun Brick posted photos showing the construction so i can only assume it took over 3 years to build.Photos of the construction and loads of the finished ship can be found on his Geo Cities page(Which is in Japanese so i cant read it :S)Below are a selection of the most impressive photos.Video is not all still images, it has some great panoramic views and walkarounds Via Wired

Topic by =SMART= 10 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Rooftop balcony on logcabin

This time no extensive Instructable project but a photo impression of my latest work. This is a rooftop balcony/belvedere at our log cabin, in the back of our garden, in Eben Emael. The view at the hill side of the valley is nice from a higher point of view. The photo's show how it is done. There are stairs to the gutter and from there to the balcony. The surface of this is 2 by 2 meter. The level above the ground is 2.8 m. All the wood are impregnated shelfs for stairs, floor and rail. It is fun to sit near the treetops and have in the same time a 180 degree panorama of the surrounding with a vault of heaven above you.

Topic by IamWe 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Halloween Food Contest Winners

Congratulations to all the finalists and winners for the Halloween Food Contest.  This year brought a host of inspiring, terrifying, and ghoulish projects.  As always, it was a labor of love to have to sort through such impressive projects to choose the final nine.   Monkey Brain Cake took our top spot, with its glorious presentation and gruesome concept.  It took three days to sculpt this masterpiece, and it shows.  The photos are clean, compelling, and informative. The write-up is informative, easy to follow, and injected with humor and a real sense of the author’s personality.  Many congrats to BubbleandSweet  and thanks for sharing this epic project with us. Second prize went to three fantastic entries:  hungryhappenings’ Bleeding Cake Ball Brains showcases a clever use of several techniques, and exploits an ice cube tray to its best effect.  The finished product is subtle until interacted with, adding a delicious element of surprise.  The photos are bright and clear, and the write-up is easy to follow. The author also offers helpful suggestions for addressing trouble spots and how to make individual elements really stand out. chefsea’s Assorted Eyeballs and Sockets impressed us with a clever and unconventional use of ingredients to create an eye-popping result.  So much care and detail was put into creating such a gory, and yet appetizing snack.  The write up is deli-eye-tfully punny, and the photos well illustrated the technique.  The final result looks almost too realistic to eat! Most Awesome Halloween Cake comes to us from new author, licenseless.  While the write-up is a little hard to digest, the concept and execution are impressive.   Every part of the cake and its accoutrements were hand-sculpted to a sublimely sanguinary effect.   Small details like adding the veins to the heart before covering it in fondant are a great tribute to the amount of skill that went into creating this entry.  The third prize slots were gobbled up by five fantastic entries. Candy Corn on the Cob by alaskantomboy stormed the Internet and garnered over 100K impressive page views.  This was a very simple execution on a super clever idea.  Kudos to the great work, informative write-up, and fun photos that make this entry shine. How To Make Spider Cake Pops With Webs by sugarkissed.net is an adorable take on a modern classic.  It combines clever techniques with fun, illustrated graphics to provide a sweet Halloween treat. Ewwy Gooey Slime Filled Cupcakes by Make.Bake.Celebrate is a cheerfully disgusting sweet that could easily be tailored to suit several themes.  Quite impressive is the author’s ability to match the internal slime to the external hairy eyeball tumors, yet maintaining very different textures and mouthfeel.  Perfect balance of gross and cute, and extra points to the fun photo styling.  Halloween Stamped Tortilla Chips by wold630 introduces a fun way to liven up even the simplest of party snack.  With such clear photos, the descriptive text becomes almost unnecessary.  This is another project that can easily be modified to suit any occasion. A brilliantly simple technique applied to a very versatile, crowd friendly food, capitalizing on the Halloween theme. danlynne07 had almost too many great entries to choose from!  Haunted Grave Cupcakes is a very cute, hand-sculpted design that would surely take the cake at any party.    A very cute and clever, well-crafted design. All in all, this year brought a very impressive showing from authors both seasoned and new.   We appreciate the amount of effort everyone put into their creations, and look forward to next year's crop of spooktacular snacks and freakish fare.  

Topic by scoochmaroo 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Shop-a-Mini Contest

As Lira would say, I haz skillz. I do not, though, have any serious photo-editing skillz. So, it should be easy to impress me and earn a patch in my new contest; apply your skillz in Photoshop, Gimp or even Paint to join a Mini with anything else. Caitlinsdad's hybrid of my Mini and Thunderbird 2 (below) was the inspiration for this contest, so he has already won a patch. You can join the Mini with anything you like - animal, mineral, vegetable, even celebrity. You must use a Classic Mini (any model), not the BMW version. To win a patch, your image must impress, both with creativity and the level of skill exhibited. The judge's decision is final and potentially rather arbitrary. Ready... steady... shop! EDIT: This contest ends June 30th, midnight GMT

Topic by Kiteman 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Mother's Day Instructables

Mother's Day is this Sunday and in case you need some last-minute project to make your Mom happy we've compiled a list of Instructables that you can use. Some take just a few minutes while others can take a little over an hour. Mother's Day Flower Make a flower that will never wilt. Sneakerdoodles (Snickerdoodles)Say how much you care with these super-sweet cookies. Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip CookiesThese chewy cookies are easy to make and will definitely impress her. Perfect English SconesStart the day right with some classic scones. Be a Mother's Day Breakfast HeroEven if you're terrible in the kitchen, you can use pancake mix and a bag to create some funky pancakes. Chocolate TrufflesMoms love chocolate, 'nuff said. Orange Clove Pomander (air freshener)This is an easy and classy way to infuse the room with a pleasant scent. Photo CubePrint out some famly photos and cubify them. Sharp Pencil Quality TVPut a series of photos together into a strip for an interactive photo display. Homemade Air FreshenerPrint out some family photos on an inkjet printer and turn them into a super-custom air freshener. Custom Lift-the-Flap BookIf you want to go all out, a personalized lift-the-flap book will be remembered for months to come. Pop-Up 3D messagesPut your Mother's Day message out there in full 3D! Go the extra mile with some decorations and photos around it. Flower Pop-Up CardAnother 3D effect that's easy to pull off and provides a pleasant surprise. Have any other favorite Instructables that would be perfect for a Mother's Day present? Let us know in the comments!

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Maker Faire 2013 Slide Show!

Every year that I attend Maker Faire in San Mateo, I am more and more impressed at the caliber of talent in this community of makers. I am so grateful to be immersed in so much creativity and excellence. This year was certainly no exception. I had the opportunity to talk with many of the exhibiting Makers and am excited to see how the Maker Movement continues to grow as technology becomes more accessible, and innovation happens faster. Here is a small sampling of the photos I took at this year's Faire - It starts at the Instructables booth and Skee-Ball machines, and tours the rest of the faire! Enjoy!

Topic by audreyobscura 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


24 LED strip

Hello all, I've got what i thought would be a simple project so i could take some impressive long exposure photos. eg: www.flickr.com/photos/24528515@N05/2356088056/in/pool-lightpainted Heres the materials i have: (also see pic) 1: 24 white led's soldered in series (yes i started without knowing what i was doing :P ) 2: A small 4.5v battery pack. 3: A simple clicky switch. Heres what i dont have: 1: A clue about resistors or where to add them. 2: I don't know what voltage the leds are as they were removed from a broken led lamp by my brother. (who also dumped the casing so i cant see what the circuit on it looked like) 3: Any more patience. :) The third pic just shows one of the 24 leds being tested with a 3v battery. I've done this with all 24 to make sure that there are no dead ones. Can anyone help my ignorance?

Topic by nodnodwinkwink 8 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


I've told my friend that I like her more than a friend, but she does not like me more than a friend.?

I told my friend that I like her more than a friend, but she does not like me like the way I do to her...... I no that she still likes me as a normal friend, but i just want more than that.......I've tried so many ways to impress her, even though I was publishing her photo on my facebook.....and she was angry at me....and of course I had to delete that photo. She said that she does not want a boyfriend right nw....and maybe she will think about me if she does want one in the future... I also thought that was because I'm Aisan and she's white......so we can never be together........but she said no...... I'm really really stuck now.......Can some body help PLZZZZZZZZ??????? What I should do to make her like me more than a normal friend??????

Question by lkahuy1191 8 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Should I go when she asked me out?

I told my friend that I like her more than a friend, but she does not like me like the way I do to her... I no that she still likes me as a normal friend, but I just want more than that...I've tried so many ways to impress her, even though I was publishing her photo on my facebook...and she was angry at me...and of course I had to delete that photo. She said that she does not want a boyfriend right nw...and maybe she will think about me if she does want one in the future... I also thought that was because I'm Asian and she's white...so we can never be together...but she said no... And I feel really sad coz she wants me 2 stop everyfin and also wanna break our friendship (I'm not sure that she wants to or not) Suddenly, another friend wants to take me out for coffee coz she thinks that I seem so down......so should I go or not?

Question by lkahuy1191 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Great Pro Account Giveaway!

I have, so far, published 179  instructables, many of which have been featured, and I have also been lucky enough to win a few contest prizes. This means I have accumulated Pro codes. A lot of Pro codes. To be honest, it would take a genuine medical revolution for me to live long enough to be able to use them all, so I want to spread the joy. But, you have to earn them. All you have to do is post one of four things in the comments: A photo or video of something you made by following one of my instructables.  A photo or video of something you made that was (however vaguely) inspired by one of my instructables. A link to an instructable of your own that you are kind of embarrassed about publishing, but can't really bring yourself to delete. A photo of an instructable-related image you have spotted "in the wild" - say, an instructables shirt on a passing stranger, or you meet a dog-owner with their dog's back legs in a home-made wheelchair. The ones I like (and I'm often easily pleased) will be sent a code to unlock a 3 month Pro account. If I'm really impressed, I will send a code for a full year's Pro. This contest is open to absolutely anybody, anywhere, with no deadline (except for the natural deadline of running out of codes), and only one real rule: don't be greedy. If you are already Pro, you can also nominate somebody else to receive the Pro code, or just pass it along to them yourself. Feel free, as well, to share this topic with your friends you wish would join the site. (What does turning Pro actually get you?) A word of warning: if you do not use your code quickly, I may accidentally give the same code to somebody else, and if they use it first, you're kind of stuck...

Topic by Kiteman 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Molding Aluminum: With Gravity Die Casting

It's expensive, untested and dangerous.The idea goes like this. Start with a coffee can foundry, possibly powered with Biodiesel or Propane. Then design a mold for what you want to build using Autocad or some variant thereof. After it's finished, send the design to a machine shop to have it built out of steel. When you receive the permanent mold, melt the aluminum and pour into the mold repeatedly and often.The idea seems like a good one to me, I'll be testing it soon enough using common screw clamps to keep the mold tightly secure.Has anyone here done this? The closest I've come to doing it myself is pouring into a muffin tin.The photo below is a picture of the results which was taken from another board found here, you'll need a login, the photos are located in the forum under Machining and Tooling.Give me a shout if you dig the idea.UPDATE 5/24/07It works! Using my Harbor Freight Mini-Mill I cut out pockets in two pieces of 1018 steel, each about an inch deep, and four inches across. I then cut inlets in both pieces and welded some scrap steel U channel on the tops of both mold sections to form a pool enclosure for the excess aluminum to collect inside of and stay safely contained.Then I lit the candle on my foundry and melted the aluminum while at the same time pre-heating the molds, (connected using C-clamps) in the oven. When the aluminum melted, I poured it and it instantly solidified. After about 2 minutes of running around in a panic I cracked the mold open. The detail level is incredible. Impressions made in the mold with a fly-cutter can be seen in the casting. The casting is bright, shiny, and seemingly devoid of any burs usually associated with unfinished aluminum castings.I'll provide photos later of the test mold and casting.

Topic by Inspiracy 12 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Halloween Easy Costumes Winners

First of all - congratulations to all the finalists! Our Halloween Easy Costumes finalists shared some absolutely fantastic costumes! Here at Instructables we are always impressed with how the simplest of materials can be turned into the most amazing Halloween costumes. Not only were our finalists super creative and resourceful, their costumes were well documents and could easily be recreated on a small budget and with very little time. We loved reading all the tips and tricks for getting a costume just right, substituting materials and customization. Picking winners was challenging, but we know you'll be just as impressed as we are with them! And so, without further ado... FIRST PRIZE Composer Busts by davidandora. This costume is not only incredibly easy to do, but it's an original concept and looks fantastic. Another fun attribute is that it looks even better when grouped together, so this costume is perfect for you and your friends! SECOND PRIZE (alphabetical order) HAWKEYE. by Mr.Sanchez How to make a Thor Costume by The Rambler Minecraft Steve Costume by pjkumpon pjkumpon's Minecraft Steve Costume was one of the best we've got on Instructables - looks amazing and the finishing touches like adding velcro to keep the head on straight or adding foam for comfort truly made it a top notch costume! Hawkeye and Thor used hot glue and craft foam in fabulous and inventive ways - both costumes are definite proof that those two materials can make great costume armor. THIRD PRIZE (alphabetical order) Duct Tape TMNT Shredder Costume for $8.11 by imamathguy Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader (Kid-friendly) by eric3dee Make an award-winning costume in one night with packing tape and newspaper by morganlemae Mr. Fredrickson from UP - Halloween costume, 8mo+ by T_Albrecht YOSHI HOODIE by jtrask1 Our third prize winners really shined when it came to using household and ready made materials! Mr. Fredickson's PVC pipe walker was perfect - and we loved the idea of adding extra weight to it to help with stability. And the sweater vest and bow tie were too cute! Shredder's cardboard and duct tape armor came together quick and was ingenious - the duct tape is a great substitute for metal. The Yoshi Hoodies were a great project - we loved how the author took a simple piece of clothing and was able to make a cute costume that looked great and was easy to wear out trick or treating! morganlemae's tree costume shows the potential of packing tape in costume making - I can't wait to see if it spawns more packing tape costumes. And last but not least, the creative use of materials like ace bandages and a milk jug for the Luke Skywalker and Vader costume was really impressive - not to mention the absolutely adorable photos! Congratulations to all that entered! It was so much fun reviewing all the entries. Our Halloween contests make us realize we truly have the most creative and expressive community on the internet. You are all amazing - thank you for sharing with us. :D

Topic by jessyratfink 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Digital Open: An Innovation Expo for Global Youth

IFTF, Sun, and Boing Boing just launched Digital Open, and I'm proud to share that I'm helping judge entries."What can you make with technology that will change the world, make the future -- or even just make life a little easier or more fun?"Institute for the Future, in partnership with Sun Microsystems and Boing Boing, invite youth worldwide, age 17 and under, to join us as we explore the frontiers of free and open innovation. Running from April 15 until August 15, 2009, the Digital Open: An Innovation Expo for Global Youth will accept text, photos, and videos documenting projects at DigitalOpen.org from young people around the world, all licensed under one from a list of free and open software licenses.Youth can submit projects in a variety of areas, ranging from the environment, media, and community, to the more traditional open source domains of software and hardware. Additionally, the Digital Open will provide resources and links to help them learn more about free and open technology movements, from figures like Richard Stallman to organizations like Creative Commons."As a company that engages schools, teachers and students from around the world to discover the transformative power of open technology, we jumped at the opportunity to work with the Institute for the Future to conceive and create The Digital Open," said Linda Rogers, Sun Microsystems' Director of Global Communities. "From Buenos Aries to Beijing to Budapest, we know that global youth are capable of spurring remarkable creativity and innovation. The Digital Open will be a window for the world to be impressed and optimistic about what the next generation will bring."Marina Gorbis, Executive Director of the Institute for the Future emphasized the participatory nature of the project. "The Digital Open is more than just a competition," she says. "It's about recognizing and encouraging kids to follow their passions while giving them community experiences that further encourage or challenge their best thinking."As an online, open source interpretation of the traditional high school science fair or world expo, the project's social networking-driven website encourages collaboration, communication, and sharing ideas. On DigitalOpen.org, youth can converse with each other about their projects, submit entries together, and win a series of achievement badges that they can repost on their own blogs and websites.The top project in each of our eight categories will be selected by our panel of approximately 20 judges, includes David-Michel Davies, Executive Director of the Webby Awards; Lawrence Lessig, Harvard/Creative Commons; David Pescovitz, Boing Boing; and Dale Dougherty, publisher of Make.To give the talented young innovators public exposure beyond the Digital Open, Boing Boing, a culture and technology blog with millions of readers, will feature each winner in his or her own video for the site. All of us at Boing Boing Video are excited about the opportunity to cultivate youth innovation in open technology," says Xeni Jardin, Boing Boing Video Host and Executive Producer. "We hope that young makers will use the Digital Open to really show off their work--and to connect with like-minded digital explorers around the world."The winning young innovators will also receive a technology prize package including a PeeCee mini laptop running the OpenSolaris operating system, a video camera, a solar-powered flashlight, and other assorted goodies.Forty years ago, IFTF's founders imagined a world in which it would be possible to improve human lives and build better organizations by thinking systematically about the future. These were visionaries saw the power of using computers and networks to build collective intelligence. Harnessing the intelligence of large groups of experts to develop forecasts, using new open-source tools take forecasting to the next level--engaging vastly larger groups of experts and non-experts in immersive experiences that allow us to envision multitudes of future possibilities in a dynamic and continuous way. DigitalOpen.org is the third open, collaborative platform that IFTF has launched this year where the public can participate in imagining and inventing the future, and the first specifically targeting youth--the true future of innovation.Find out more at digitalopen.org.Digital Open Judges:Lawrence Lessig, Creative Commons, Stanford Law SchoolDavid-Michel Davies, Webby Awards, International Academy of Digital Arts & SciencesDale Dougherty, O'Reilly Media, MAKEBilly Bicket, TechSoup/NetSquaredSimon Dingle, Finweek MagazinePatricia Lange, USC Institute for Multimedia LiteracyEric Wilhelm, InstructablesXeni Jardin, Boing BoingDavid Pescovitz, Boing Boing/IFTFKati London, Botanicalls & Area/CodeThe Playtime Anti-Boredom SocietyNick Bilton, New York Times/NYC ResistorJane McGonigal, IFTFJessica Mah, IntershipIN.comHeather Ford, Africa CommonsIsaac Mao, CNBlog.org, United Capital Investment, Global Voices OnlineColin Bulthaup, PotencoOona Castro, Overmundo InstituteElizabeth Stark, Yale Information Society Project, Students for Free CultureAhrash Bissel, Creative Commons, ccLearnPhoebe Ayers, Author: How Wikipedia WorksKiruba Shankar, Knowledge FoundationLinda Rogers, Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Topic by ewilhelm 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago