Propane in air compressor hose

Does anyone know how a regular (150psi rated) air hose will stand up to propane? I'm curious as to whether it would dissolve it.

Posted by Hegemone 10 years ago


Replacing a propane stove with a wood stove --HELP NEEDED

I need to remove a propane heating stove and install a woodstove that I already own. I'd like to install the woodstove in the same spot as where the propane stove sat and I'd llke to use the same venting pipe if possible. The problem that I see is that the propane stove uses a 4.5" vent pipe off the back of the stove and it continues to be 4.5" pipe as far up the chimney as I can see (only a foot or two) also, the propane vent pipe is thin, flexible aluminum pipe that goes up the inside of the chimney, while the woodstove connecting pipe is 6". I don't know if the woodstove can be used with 4.5" flex vent pipe from the propane stove or if it needs bigger, steel pipe for wood fires. Does anyone know? Thanks. Peter Norwell, MA

Posted by menemsha1 7 years ago


Propane Fire Pit

I made a propane fire pit and can't get the flame to go high. I was wondering if it makes a difference on the distance that I have the propane tank from the fire pit? and do I have to use an air mixture?

Posted by spiderpig16pd 3 years ago


safety valve bbq propane

I understand the pressure relief valve. I understand the float valve which prevents overfilling. But is there any mechanism to prevent liquid propane from leaking if the tank tips?

Posted by Toga_Dan 3 years ago


propane machine gun simulator help

I like to make a small propane machine gun simulator, the kind they use in movies. I need to know how to make the firing circuit board, what type of solenoid's I can use & what type of ignition coil & spark plug to ignite the gas. Put it simply, I need a DIY on How to build an oxygen propane machine gun simulator.

Posted by elkaddalek 2 years ago


Propane torch

I've considered several times buying a propane torch to burn weeds in my driveway, or melt ice. The one I'd like to have looks like a cane with a threaded connector on the handle end to attach a propane bottle. They all seem overpriced to me and I've always wondered if I could make one cheaper than I could buy one. I can find the tubing I need but I've never been able to find the rest of the parts.  Any suggestions or would someone like to post an instructable showing how to make one?

Posted by jpoling 2 years ago


Propane expension

Does anyone know of an extension for a 1 lb propane tank that features a hose that ends in a pencil torch nozzle for more agile, fine work?

Posted by Plutosson 1 year ago


Propane vs. Charcoal?

I'm going to make the move back to regular ol' charcoal for its sheer cheapness, and my ability to make it hotter than propane. Mainly though i've been running on the last dregs of my propane, and i'm going on-the-cheap and as free of electricity as possible soonish-like. What do you use and why?

Posted by abbabibble2 10 years ago


Battery over ride for electric start on Propane Furnace

I would like to create a battery override for the starter on my propane furnace. We've lost power a few times during some of the major storms. If I could backup the electric starter on the furnace with a battery backup, I could still have heat during any loss of power.

Posted by mmontana 4 years ago


build a propane powered freezer

I am interested in constructing a  propane powered freezer to store food.   The units currently for sale and way to expensive.  I recall  quite a while ago that some  supplier of  off grid equipment  sold the components to such a unit but I can no longer find them.  If  someone has built such a freezer I would be interested in knowing how they did it.

Posted by holtconco 7 years ago


Propane flame thrower

    Please read full post before making any comments. First of all yes, I know real flame throwers use napalm and compressed air to operate, but I don't want any crazy range and lethal power. I don't intend on using this thing in combat. I'm thinking something with a 4-5 foot flame, more if possible, (I don't think it would be with propane, but please, correct me if I'm wrong). I don't want a jet flame so I'm assuming I'll need to lower the pressure to get a more "violent" looking flame with the desired ranged. A "gas pump handle" for the flame control (sorry I don't know the proper term for that type of mechanism. it's not really a trigger. A lever valve?), or I might use a solenoid, not sure yet, Whatever would be more effective. Again, please give me any input your may have. The fuel source would be a large propane tank that I will have strapped to my back, I already have a design for that. If that seems too extreme I might do what this guy did and use a small tank with a reservoir, but with two tanks for more fuel. ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypIGeNdJbJ4 )  I'm undecided on whether I want electric ignition if anyone could give advice on that as well it would be appreciated. Anyone who has made something like this or knows what they are talking about please give me your input. Yes, I know this is a dangerous project and I take full responsibility should anything go wrong.    This is a video showing the flamethrower that in the above video being used. It displays the kind of performance I am looking for, except I don't want it strapped to my wrists. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5_ogU4Jzt4

Posted by shark4t 3 years ago


Cheap Source Of Propane?

When I got a new can of propane, for my torch, it was $9. At wally world, it was $4. Then, when I went to get a can of cooking stove propane from the camping department (at wal-mart), I notice that the tank was $3. After getting home, I noticed that the threads were exactly the same, and that the torch head would screw onto the neck of the "camp propane" bottle. So, as anyone would do, I fired it up, and it worked! Of course, it would shut off it you tilted it too far, but what the heck! $3 for a can of propane. But then I thought "Why is this so cheap, and why haven't I heard of this before? Is ther something wrong with this? Will I blow myself up?!?!?! Anyway, I'm all for saving $2, or $6 (depending on where I go), so is this actually a reasonable way of saving money?So what I'm asking:-Is this way safe? I haven't fired it up since, in case it did something bad.-Why is it so cheap to but it that way, and so expensive to buy regular tanks?-Has anyone else done this?If anyone can help, it'd be appreciated.

Posted by John Smith 11 years ago


My PROPANE (!) Foundry

Hey, I'm sure you've read some of my other foundry questions and comments, so here's another. I have been using this with charcoal briquettes for quite some time now, and finally built a burner to convert to propane. I made my first melt with it earlier, and I don't think I'll ever switch back, no matter how high propane gets (price). I built a burner according to the instructions here, and it turned out fine, except that the flame won't leave the burner tube completely. It fits pretty well in my helium tank foundry/furnace (a .gif on how I made it is below), heating it up to melting temps on full blast in probably <10 minutes. It is SO much cleaner, easier to make multiple melts( no refilling charcoal), and is alot quicker in starting and finishing a melt (no setting up blowers, positioning charcoal, and that stuff).It was (at first) an easy choice to go with charcoal (cheap, could even be made for free), but after a couple melts, the fun got replaced by work, and I stopped melting metal. I discovered propane, built my burner for $35 total(including regulator) and was up and running within a day. ~$20 for a refill on propane when I run out is COMPLETELY worth it. Sorry if this seems kinda persuasive, but I am trying to help either people on this site, or one of the countless wanderers from Google.Some pictures of my testing (not my burning setup) setup are below.

Posted by John Smith 10 years ago


solar

Need DIY plans for a "auto sun tracker" for my solar projects. Once saw one using a bottle of propane. Does anybody else remember this?

Posted by larryloh 11 years ago


Propane or Natural gas Tiki torches

I am interested in making some gas Tiki torches for my back yard like the ones you see in Hawaii. I have looked around and can not find any information on how to build a torch like that. I would buy some, but was rather turned off by the $150.00 each price tag. I would appreciate any info if someone would like to share.

Posted by happy hippo 11 years ago


Using Aluminium Cans for A ram Jet Engine Barrel,

If you soaked aluminum from a soda-pop can in vinegar or other acid to remove the paint, would it be possible to smith the metal using a small hammer into a barrel for a small jet engine, The engine I plan will produce thrust and use Butane,

Posted by Steamdnt 10 years ago


Auto Solar tracker

Need a DIY plan for maintaining the most sun exposure for my solar panel projects. Saw one a few years ago using a bottle of propane gas. Anybody out there have any ideas?

Posted by larryloh 11 years ago


Need help designing an outdoor, propane fueled roux cooker for gumbo

Our Kiwanis club has a roux party every year where a dozen or so people cook roux in cast iron pots over gas burners. Hours of stirring of various liquids, veggies and spices (added at intervals through out the cooking cycle). Cooked until it becomes a solid about the consistency of moist turkey dressing, to be dipped out into a pan and then start a new batch. What we need is something like a small cement mixer with burners. Something that will heat liquid, mix, and dump or we can scoop out when it's solidified. The stirring needs to be constant hence the cement mixer premise. If it doesn't mix well and parts of it burn then the entire batch is ruined. Electricity is available, propane bottles for fuel. Tried thinking through something with two metal cylinders, one inside the other with the gas jets between the two but the rotation part is the issue. Any help will be appreciated, and of course since we are a small nonprofit the cost needs to be as low as possible.    Thank you !      Tray10 

Posted by Tray10 5 years ago


Homemade hang drum?

I can't get empty used propane tank. Hardly and rarely someone uses it in estonia. So I was thinking to use pot from homedepot.  I have no idea what else I can use. Any ideas someone?  I think that right types of metal gives right sound.  

Posted by DeathSuperMario 4 years ago


Fire Ball

I am looking to build a device to launch indoor ball of flame, 2 to 4 ft in diameter without taking the house down.  Was considering propane as fuel.  I am working in an area with 14 foot ceiling.  Had thought of using paintball gun valving but I am not out to re invent the wheel.  If anyone has any ideas or plans I would thankfull.

Posted by rogerrwj 8 years ago


brazing beginner

I'm making a CNC machine and I need to make a frame and I decided to use aluminum since it's surprisingly the cheapest. I need to braze the joints to gather and I'm new to brazing. Is all I need: Propane bottle Nozzle someway to ignite it brass solder If anyone here is an experience brazer than please give me some tips

Posted by guyfrom7up 10 years ago


brazing/welding dilemma

I'm building a cnc machine and I just bought a whole bunch of steel vat a surplus store. I need to braze or weld them together, but I can't braze since the objects too big for my propane tank, it disipates tthe heat to fast. I can't afford an arc welder. What should I do? I don't want to use nuts and bolts because that adds wiggle to the machine and I lose all of my accuracy.

Posted by guyfrom7up 10 years ago


British Columbia introduces carbon tax

VICTORIA -- Driving and other fuel-dependent activities are about to get more expensive as British Columbia becomes the first jurisdiction in North America to introduce a consumer-based carbon tax.The carbon tax will apply to virtually all fossil fuels, including gasoline, diesel, natural gas, coal, propane, and home heating fuel. B.C.'s carbon tax, the provincial government claims, will be the most comprehensive in the world.full article

Posted by ewilhelm 10 years ago


Thermometer for furnace

OK I have created Shark500's furnace (which was an awesome Instructable). I have made some modifications to it. Now I'm curious can some one help me make a inexpensive thermometer for it? I have made mine a bit bigger and I am using a 16oz propane tank as my crucible with about a 1/2" thick cement coating on it and the top is my lid. I figure I could wire a sensor through the old valve but I don't know where to start to make something like this. could some one please assist me in this it would be greatly appreciated.

Posted by Jdogg55 10 years ago


A Good Crucible

Im new to the forge community and i need some advice. I built my first forge useing the charcoal and coffie can method. i melted about 20 or more cans so far and got about 86 grams of aluminum. The crucible i used was a soup that i burned through. I done that twice. While melting I got a lot of slag. Is that normal when melting cans? I also need a good crucible. What can i use for now and where can i get a good one later. I plan to make a propane forge in the near future so a few tips here would be helpfull as well. Any and all advice would be helpfull. Thank you in advance ~Jeht Black~

Posted by Jeht Black 11 years ago


A challenge of sorts: Field Kitchen

I want a military style field kitchen.  Not the giant 30,000 dollar trailers, the small but efficient kind towed by jeeps with 60 hp in the world wars. It has come to my attention that even these are quite expensive, not mention rare. I want to basically make a clone, except perhaps make it light enough to push by hand (should be possible by replacing non-essential heavy materials with light ones) and make it propane powered. Hopefully on a budget of a few hundred dollars. Any suggestions are welcome. A base/ pre-made trailer or cart to build it off of, material reccomendations, and most importantly how to implement the the cooking part. It needs tot be able to house 2 30 gallon pots and griddle top. pic is more or less what I'm aiming for

Posted by Bando_Red 8 years ago


HFC M190 Dual-Gas Airsoft Pistol

I am selling my HFC M190 airsoft pistol.I was into airsoft for a little when I was younger, but have since outgrown it and am selling my gun.It has only been used about 8 times.Works perfectly, as I value my possessions. The gun can be rendered inoperable by removing the slide.The gun also can be taken completely apart.Its all metal, exact weight, and size as the gun its based off: Beretta 92The gun is semi-auto, and full auto variability.It uses green gas, (propane), but also can use CO2 canisters with the appropriate magazine.Included is:The gun (duh)One magazineExtra handle grips (wood)Auto-loaderTwo canisters of brand new Green GasOne canister of lubrication oil.ManualCarrying case$85 for everything PM me please.

Posted by bumpus 10 years ago


Rubens tube help!

Hey everybody, Ok so me and my friend built a rubens tube for our science project and fired ot up today. It was awesome! But, we have one problem. the flames keep getting blown out or are dying and we dont know why. Our tube is about 4 or 5 feet long and has holes every half inch (1/16th drill bit). we used latex sheets on both ends. the propane is a camping tank (small) and feeds the rubens tube through 2x 1/4 inch feeds spaced evenly apart. It may just be that we need to let the tube pressurize more. Our tube is 4 inches in diameter and is about 5 feet long. We let it pressurize for about 5 minutes. I think maybe somewhere along the lines of 7 minutes might do the trick, because when we went to light it, the initial flame height was very short. Has anyone else used the same setup we have?

Posted by ir0n_ma1den 10 years ago


Calling all Potato Gun Aficionados and wanna be Combustion Scientists

This is message to anyone who enjoys hearing the sound of forced combustion, or better yet, the loud crack of a potato gun being fired. My co-conspirator and I are in need of some mathematic assistance. Ideally we are looking for a “magic” formula concerning barrel length to blast chamber ratio for optimal performance. The ideal fuel would be propane or butane. We have been using a 4” by 33” blast chamber coupled with a 3” by 44” barrel. So far, we have had significant success with this combination, but are curious if there is a better ratio to use. With our current specs, we are able to shoot a 3 – 4 lb. ball of plaster over 250 yards (this is the carry distance, not the total distance traveled) at a 47 degree angle. If anyone out there knows a formula or has advice on Blast Chamber to Barrel ratios we are greatly interested to hear what you have to say.

Posted by benihana 10 years ago


how to strip large diameter copper wire

If you have say 2 inch or better diameter copper wire to strip here is what I do. I have ben in the scrap arena for years. Buy a large handeled pair of shears that are only for copper. They will look much like a large pair of boltcutters. Cut your insulated wire into about two foot lenghts. Get a large pot, the bigger the better and heat with an out door propane burner full of water. Place the cut sticks of wire into the boiling water fro about five min. Get some insulated rubber gloves and a sharp razor knofe and you will find that the plastic insulation carves away like butter. This works on everykind of insulated wire I have come across. With lead wrapped insulated wire, get a plasma torch. It cutts easily and is so fast the plastic wire inside does not have time to catch on fire. Use plenty of ventilation to avoid breathing lead based fumes.

Posted by beserker 6 years ago


Which Projects should I instructablize?

       Complete, yet undocumented: 1 Hero Steam Engine 2 Ice Bullet 3 Heated side mirrors (truck) 4 Camera launched from cannon 5 Easy ways to connect batteries without the "proper" battery case. 6 Disconnect anti-lock brake circuit when they start acting like it's icy even on dry pavement. 7 Bicycle turns a car alternator, generates power. 8 Firestarting reflector from space-blanket. 9 Modify an off-the-shelf night light which is designed to light when A) smoke alarm beeps  B) It's dark. I only wanted light when smoke alarm goes off. 10 Home-made rocket engine. 11 Augment gasoline with propane when auto fuel pump is crapping out. 12 Adapt lawnmower to cut very tall grass 13 Non slip surface for ramp. 14 Apple picker.                     Some of these I still have around. Some, not.  Yet I might be able to dig up pics, or do line drawings + writeup.  I numbered em to make it easy to reference items.

Posted by Toga_Dan 4 years ago


What fittings can I connect together (building an air compressor) ?

Hi, I'm building an air compressor out of fridge compressors, propane tanks and NPT fittings from ebay, everything was cool until I received a check valve I ordered before all the other stuff (because it was from another seller so no need for a group order :) for one item). So I ordered a 1/8 female/female check valve (one way valve), and I measured the diameter with calipers, and it's not 1/8" (3.2mm) but a lot more, which makes sense, 3mm would be really tiny so now I don't understand how all of that works here are the fittings that will compose the system (those are 1/2 I guess but I will order 1/4 and 1/8 as well to make the complete circuit (around 20 fittings total): http://www.ebay.com/itm/281299625853 here is the check valve I already ordered (1/8 BSPP): http://www.ebay.com/itm/182025682762 I also noticed the valve is linear while the fittings appear to be the shape of a cone, will it matter ? Thanks in advance for any help ;)

Posted by nazmo76 2 years ago


workshop heating ideas.

Hello all, I have a slight problem, while designing my workshop for the winter months, I happened across a monumental problem... how am I going to heat it? As any Canadian reading this will know, our winters are not for the faint of heart (-50 anyone?), the structure I designed has a metal frame, HardiBacker lined inside and out as walls, screwed into the metal poles, fireproof spray foam insulation in between the cement board walls, it has been placed on a gravel surface, and is held to the ground by rebar that is nailed into the ground a few feet, and currently no ventilation. I know it has flaws left right and center, but I'm working with what i have right now, and I've got very little to work with. The structure is quite small 10' x 8' at 640sq. feet. Winter is on its way and I need ideas for heating. I've thought about wood heating but I'll need all the space I can get on the inside. propane heaters are quite expensive, and electric heaters.... well its out in the middle of a field basically. Im looking for something that can heat it up fairly quickly, and is safe, I made it fireproof so i guess a tiger torch isn't out of the question.....  Any suggestions are welcome! Cheers!

Posted by fasterthanfalcon 4 years ago


Setting up two forges...

Basically I have two ideas, one of which I'm pretty ready to make now and another which will take a little longer to make, one is a tiny forge, like desktop sized, for working at home and the other is a much larger forge for big metalwork projects, thankfully the large one will actually require less parts scavenging as I have plenty of acces to scrap material and there's a brickyard over the wall from us which will do me the necessary materials very cheap, mainly because I did a little forklift driving for them for larger heavyweight loads over three tonnes. That's all well and good a big one I can get my head round easily enough, But. How would I go about making a tiny forge and I mean miniscule, it's main purpose is for heating to cast for my specialist parts I prefer making and the other is for low material single cast jewellry my mum makes (she used to own a jewewllry business and still makes the odd bespoke items. But my main question is how I can build a reliable yet compact forge and furnace, from what I have sitting around I'm sure I can come up with a decent fuel source, ranging from butane torches and stoves, both of which can do propane and I could go to natural gas (we have a special plug out the back for gas barbeques the house had it when we came...) but my other questions are a bit more odd, first of all what would make a great crucible, I need something that'll be fairly invincible to the hardships caused by life, as the other liely user of the forge and furnace is very forgetful and sometimes accident prone. Next up is the housing, would it be feasible to use a single block of thermocrete cast to make the main furnace housing, as in everything is but the fuel and air source holes and the crucible hole would be one block, as it stands that seems like the best way to make it simple and effective, plus it would be pretty airtight where needed. Next question is the fuel and temperatures, I know that butane at full combustion get 1300C and 1000C is a practicable operating temp. for a butane item but what about propane or even natural gas, since it would be very cheap and clean burning... I'm a bit of a noob towards this end of the scale, I can make stuff hot and I can do alot with these things but actual forge and furnace making is a little beyond me on this scale, however I can think of several advantages to my baby furnace, including the practical movement of it, as it could be self contained very easily. The pic was just one of the last pictures that's remotely intersting I uploaded, however it raises it's own points as the jet engine basically welded all it's components forward of the flame together.

Posted by killerjackalope 10 years ago


Back-up power

Hey there folks! Looking for some advise again. NH just went through the worst power outage in years (maybe history). 6 days without power has me thinking again. I have means of heat (wood stove) and means of cooking (propane) and lighting (candles and my LED projects), but the well pump is a problem. The need of water to flush the toilets came from the stream nearby, all well and good as it was, washing our bodies from buckets has to go. I have learned that my 220vac well pump actually draws it's power from 2 110 vac circuits. If I have this right (which is my first question, is this even possible) I only need a 110vac converter to run this off my batteries. Now, if I'm correct here (second question) a 4amp 220vac pump is 880 watts, then the draw from the 12vdc battery should be 74amps (give a few for losses maybe 80 amps). I only have 2 160AH deep cell batteries running currently. Am I looking at a reality of 2 hrs (half the draw) or 4 hrs use (full draw)? Or, is it even less.... Yup, that was a third question! I just bought a 2500 (5000 max) watt inverter intended for the shop and thought I would use this as my back-up for the winter. Am i even close here?

Posted by olddawg 9 years ago


Woodstove

I have built this woodstove for my tiny house. I had tight space limitations. I chose a used 20 gal+/- propane tank. I cut out a door and exhaust opening with a disc on my angle grinder. Helpful hint. I attached hinges befor making the last cut on the door. It lines up perfectly. I found a piece of 6" well casing for my stack. An old piece of sheet steel for the top, in which I cut a 4" hole for my flue. I am using the tank upsied down as I am using the original valve opening, which is 3/4" pipe thread for outside combustion air. I welded the tank onto a 15" used steel car wheel for a sturdy stand. I will not be burning wood only manufactured logs like from Tractor Supply and will be making used paper for making presed pulp logs. I am letting the High Heat paint fumes air off before I fire it up. I also have a CO and Smoke Detector plus a Fire Extinguisher. There is a dampner in the flue and a thru wall fixture. It is mostly airtight. I installed 1/8" flanges on in and outside of the door. Used  a black wrought iron gate latch for a closer and some brass machine screws for bling. lol If anyone does this make sure you know what the hell you are doing, if not don't try this at home.

Posted by SamDee43 2 years ago


(newsletter) Vertical Garden, Cryptex, Bubble Lamp...

Sign-up for this newsletter: Welcome back! Check out some bright blinky projects - see who won the Get the LED Out! Contest! We've still got three fantastic contests this week, so start thinking, get to work, and enter! Pocket-Sized Contest - Think small, and win a custom laser-etched Leatherman! Get in the Garden Contest - Enter any Instructable with a gardening theme and win an awesome computer-controlled indoor composting machine from NatureMill! Art of Sound Contest - Share any music or sound-related Instructable, and win an incredible custom hi-fi tower set with subwoofer, monster speakers, and more!! Make a Cryptex Vertical Vegetable Garden Refill Disposable Propane Tanks Cheap and Simple Bottle Cap Magnets! See who won! Win these custom hi-fi speakers! Build a D-Ring Bit Driver How to Break Up Repair Cigarette Burns on Carpet Bubble Lamp Bowling Ball Fountain Steampunk Garter Pistol Prop Crystallised Ginger Painted Mattress Survival Boat Win a cool computer-controlled indoor composter! Win a custom laser-etched Leatherman! World's Smallest Gripper Robot Pocket Scrolls Nerf Mods: A Beginner's Guide Pocket Sized Camp Stove Sign-up for this newsletter:

Posted by fungus amungus 9 years ago


Tin Can Turbine Engine

Hello!               Let me give you some insight into this project (Tin Can Turbine). I'm going to school to get an Airframe and Power Plant Cert. (Aircraft Mechanic). I stumbled across this idea on YouTube one day in class and it really got my gears turning. It's purely for fun, and I'm not even sure if I have the technical skills to get it to work.             First of all the way a turbine engine works in layman's terms is Suck, Squeeze, Bang, Blow. The fan section sucks air in from the atmosphere, Where it is moved to a compressor section which squeezes the air into a tighter pocket of air; which makes the air hotter and more explosive. When the compressed air is pushed into the combustion chamber, it is more volatile than normal air due to the compression. When you add a fuel (jet fuel, gasoline, propane, kerosene etc...) it will ignite with the compressed air (given that there is a spark to get the fuel vapors to ignite). When the fuel/air mixture is lit the fire will continue to burn without an ignition source due to the explosive nature of the compressed air. And the gas (burnt fuel/air) is pushed out the exhaust. There are blades in the rear of the engine called turbine blades, which are connected to the front of the fan/compressor section, in some cases there are two or three turbine blades, which drive the fan, compressor sections independently. Due to the turbine blades being pushed by the exiting gasses, the engine becomes self sustaining. And through black magic, you have a jet engine!!!              I'm going to attempt to construct a jet engine (not a motor!) out of a "tin can". I'm really not going to use a tin can, I'm actually going to use .032" thick 3" wide, and about 6" long exhaust piping made out galvanized steel. It's a lot thicker than a typical soup can, thus willing to stand up to more heat. My proposed fuel source will be propane, because it's cheap, and the I'm sure that I'm capable of controling the amount of fuel going into the engine. I'm not sure yet how many fan blades vs. turbine blades that I'm going to use. Right now I'm in the experiment phase. My blades are going to be made out steel can tops, because there is very little cutting involved, beside the actual cutting and angling the blades. and they fit perfectly into the pipe. As for the fuel delivery i'm going to use a copper pipe that is approx .042 thick and hallow. I'm going to cap the end, and wrap it around the inside of can. There will be eight holes drilled into the copper, which should give it plenty of fuel at equal pressure all the way around the can, equals same heat all around.         As for the drive shaft, I'm not exactly sure of what to use for that. I may want to go with something hardened already, so the heat surrounding it won't melt it. (that's the hope anyways) . I'm also not sure of what sort of bearings I will use. I was thinking skate board bearing with the plastic crap around the middle taken out (so it doesn't melt and seize the bearings) and extreme high temp. white lithium grease for lube.          This is an experiment and I guarantee myself absolutely no success. But I think it will be fun to try. Questions or comments are more than welcome. Please, if you see any problems with the design, let me KNOW!!!

Posted by shawnpc 6 years ago


Iron Man

Hello. No one seems to have done anything in this group at all since inception. That honestly sucks, as I was hoping that someone would have put in some time and at least come out with some sketches, or put their thoughts down on paper. Well I am not one to complain without doing something about the problem. First up is the issue of powered movement. That is the core of Iron Man's super strength. You have 3 real options here. Hydraulic, Stepper Motor, or Servo Motor. I have filtered out hydraulic simply because it is not as easy to work with as the other electrical motors. I found a comparison chart, and a link to it is posted below. http://www.legacycncwoodworking.com/stepper-vs-servo-motors/ Based on the information it contained, I would say that a stepper motor is the most efficient way to go. It takes more power to run, and generates more heat, but neither of those problems is difficult to deal with. Heat syncs, and a propane/natural gas generator will solve both of those problems readily. The next problem is the exoskeleton, the armored body of Iron Man. I have looked into materials, and the difficulty in casting them, or machining them. ZA, or Zinc Aluminum alloys seem to be the way to go. They are relatively easy to make, requiring only about 900F to melt them, they cast extremely well, and they make extremely fine detailed castings. When they set up, they have hardness equivalent to that of Cast Iron. They also lend themselves readily to sand casting, mold casting, and to graphite casting. Alright, I have put my 2 cents in. Lets hear from the rest of you.

Posted by xarlock667 8 years ago


Steam generator for a home-made steam room

I love steam rooms. i want to build one out behind our house in the country in thailand. but it has to be low-tech. i'm thinking i'll make a square wall out of cinderblocks, about 4 feet high. then my shower will stick up from that .we don't have running water. we get water pumped from the well into big jars and use a bowl to splash water on ourselves to wash. but i put a submersible pump in the bottom of the jar, rigged up some PVC pipe and i have a shower of sorts. so if i build a 4 foot high square wall, with a doorway, i can pull a thick piece of foam over the top to cover the top, hang a rubber curtain across the doorway opening, and have an enclosed, outdoor room that i can steam up and sweat the gunk out, then stand up, flip off the insulating cover and shower right there. the steam room will go right behind me and the jars in the shower picture- where you can see a little bit of grass growing. but how do i make a steam generator? commercial ones cost way more dollars (baht) than i need to spend. i can use propane from a tank for fire, or wood, or charcoal. the well water is very hard water with a lot of dissolved minerals in it so my steam generator can't be something that will get clogged up with mineral deposits. anybody got any ideas? the steam generator needs to be cheap, home-build-able with local materials, and safe... don't want anything that can blowup, catch fire, or asphyxiate the users.

Posted by Thaikarl 10 years ago


(newsletter) Ambidexterity, Breadboard Tips, All-Weather Bike Helmet...

Jan 29, 2009 Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); } Welcome back! The Craftsman Workshop of the Future Contest winners have been announced! See who won the $20,000 grand prize, and the $500 runner-up prizes!Have some nagging issue that's holding up your latest project? Check out our new Answers section and tap into the Instructables community's pool of knowledge! It's cold up here in the northern areas and we want you to show us some great ways to fight the chill in the Stay Warm Contest. Win a brand new sleeping bag!These are the final days to reuse and recycle a plastic bottle for the Tap'dNY Keep the Bottle Contest. Enter by Sunday night to win a Voltaic solar-charging backpack! Leyden jar of DOOM! by nickademuss Build Buoys from Plastic Bottles by Patenteux du Nord Make a Postal Scale from Old CDs by Phil B LED-Paper Craft Lamps by mike_b See who won! Closes for entries this Sunday! Recycled Plastic in Plane Design by petercd Wine Bottle Lamp by reclaimagination Convert a Generator to Run on Propane by Rainh2o Ten Breadboard Tips and Tricks by klee27x Turn a Laptop Screen into a Mirror by MidnightSon Make an Easy to use Tape Dispenser by Creativeman The Quest for Ambidexterity by Mother Natures Son Make a Lego Valve Stem Cap by imaseahawksfan Share your best way to fight the cold and win a sleeping bag! Check out our latest feature! Make Home Energy Improvements with the Government's Help by zieak DIY Choreographed House Lights by prabbit22m Real-time Web Based Household Power Usage Monitor by jasonT All-Weather Bike Helmet by jeff-o Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup2","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); }

Posted by fungus amungus 9 years ago


Live in the Bay Area? Interactive art this weekend!

Alchemy is an event intended to bring all types of art forms together and make them accessible and fun to interact with and add your creative mark to - come play and design and craft and art it up with us! It's at -- CELLspace in San Francisco -- (2050 Bryant, @ 18th St, in the Mission) This Saturday -- April 26th -- from 9pm-2am. It's $15 and there will be a full bar available. The shows and stations that it will include: - a fashion show "Styles of Magic" by Missing Piece @ 10pm - a magic show "Phantoccino" by Keith Boudreau, showing 4 times over the night - an all-local Art Gallery curated by Will Chase Arts, half of which is priced under $100 - Alchemical Afforestation, an interactive steel sculpture by Shira Loa ---> you make the bark of the tree! - Digicrylic Mash-Up by Dangermarc and Ron Goldin ---> you draw on one side, they on another! - PyroCardium, a heartbeat-powered candelabra by False Profit Labs ---> try the stethoscope on! - Web of (de)Construction, a live textile piece by Medium Reality ---> become entangled in this web! - Identity Tapestry by Mary Corey March ---> see how your line of self lines up with others! - Flame Tree Building Workshop by False Profit Labs ---> make a fire sculpture! - Phoenix Aviary, a reactive video installation ---> dance and move, and see the flame-tastic results! - Writing Photos, an intersection of writing and photography ---> tell us a story that you see in the picture! - Altered Paintings, reworking thrift-store finds ---> that mountain scene needs an anime monster, don't you think? - Interactive Lights & Magnets... Photo Booth... Lego Robots... Origami... Knitting and more! check out www.false-profit.com/alchemy Hope to see you there! Here are some pictures from our last Flame Tree Building worskhop. Reply to this post if you are interested in signing up to learn how to build these propane flame effects.

Posted by brettlevine 10 years ago


Cabin photos from indie book release- Mobile shack/trailer/fort/camper made from trash

As promised, here's some photos of one of the newer JUNK CABINS I'm building.... AND...  http://relaxshax.wordpress.com/2010/01/    Its part of the indie book I just released on small houses/shacks... This cabin's nothing fancy, and stands at a mere 24 square feet, but it sleeps two (bunk-style), has a dutch style door (made from two recycled kitchen cabinet doors), and all in all is almost completely made from salvaged roadside/free materials- even most of the screws and nails. The paint (to make all the forklift pallet wood and scrap wood appear uniform) was unfortunately purchased (but after I sold some salvaged/found junk on craigslist). Also, The roof was originally made from mdf plywood/particle board from old stereo cabinets and tv armoirs (and an entire junked roll of roofing paper), but that proved too heavy for this wheeled/mobile cabin. In the endrun, I bit the bullet and bought some tuffex panels for roofing, which DOES give the interior some nice natural light- the only reason I decided to "cheat" with this route.      When finished, the cabin will have a mini-woodstove created from an old propane gas tank I nabbed at the dump (safety/workability pending), an outdoor kitchen/prep area attached to the cabin., and perhaps a small broken solar light kit I rewired and fixed. I'll also finish the wine-bottle window (not shown).    Anyway, thanks for looking!  Built to fit a trailer of mine, I'm eventually planning on hauling it up to my land in VT, where it can be used as lo-fi guest cabin or sorts, for those who always forget to bring tents.

Posted by Deek D 8 years ago


Molding Aluminum: With Gravity Die Casting

It's expensive, untested and dangerous.The idea goes like this. Start with a coffee can foundry, possibly powered with Biodiesel or Propane. Then design a mold for what you want to build using Autocad or some variant thereof. After it's finished, send the design to a machine shop to have it built out of steel. When you receive the permanent mold, melt the aluminum and pour into the mold repeatedly and often.The idea seems like a good one to me, I'll be testing it soon enough using common screw clamps to keep the mold tightly secure.Has anyone here done this? The closest I've come to doing it myself is pouring into a muffin tin.The photo below is a picture of the results which was taken from another board found here, you'll need a login, the photos are located in the forum under Machining and Tooling.Give me a shout if you dig the idea.UPDATE 5/24/07It works! Using my Harbor Freight Mini-Mill I cut out pockets in two pieces of 1018 steel, each about an inch deep, and four inches across. I then cut inlets in both pieces and welded some scrap steel U channel on the tops of both mold sections to form a pool enclosure for the excess aluminum to collect inside of and stay safely contained.Then I lit the candle on my foundry and melted the aluminum while at the same time pre-heating the molds, (connected using C-clamps) in the oven. When the aluminum melted, I poured it and it instantly solidified. After about 2 minutes of running around in a panic I cracked the mold open. The detail level is incredible. Impressions made in the mold with a fly-cutter can be seen in the casting. The casting is bright, shiny, and seemingly devoid of any burs usually associated with unfinished aluminum castings.I'll provide photos later of the test mold and casting.

Posted by Inspiracy 11 years ago


[newsletter] Ultrasonic Batgoggles, Miracle Fruit, Giant Lite Brite...

Sign-up for our newsletter here. May 29, 2008 Welcome back! Have a cool signature for your user name? Share it with the community at this signature collection post. Lots of people have been ordering shirts from our new store. The free shipping only lasts through tomorrow so order now!Want to win some magnetic photo rope to display your pictures? Enter our caption contest!Coming soon... a new contest based on travel tips. Check out these cool Instructables! Go Online without Getting Snooped: Tor (The Onion Router) Want to get online on a network that likes to snoop? Try using TOR. posted by w1n5t0n on May 27, 2008 Ultrasonic Batgoggles Experience echolocation and learn to "see" with your ears. posted by suneth on May 27, 2008 Cheap, easy, low-waste platform bed Build a queen size platform bed with storage space underneath for less than $30, in about an hour, and learn some basic carpentry skills in the process. posted by aeray on May 19, 2008 Make a $5.00 "Space Pen" for your wallet Put handy space pen in your wallet so that you can write upside down whenever you want. posted by doctor_wu on May 25, 2008 How to Build a Hank Drum Build your own unique drum from a propane tank with just a few basic tools. posted by Hermes on May 20, 2008 Make you own wearable arc reactor and be cooler than Tony Stark! Want your own arc reactor like the one in Iron Man? Here's how to do it. posted by mspark400 on May 26, 2008 Giant Lite Brite The original Lite Brite was cool, but a 4' x 4' version is better and allows for multiple kids of all ages to play at once! posted by noahw on May 22, 2008 Make Biodiesel! The biodiesel story continues with the method of making the biodiesel itself. posted by drinkmorecoffee on May 22, 2008 Win amazing LED POV kits! Closes for entries on Sunday! Green Science Fair! Lightbulb "green"house The humble light bulb may be on its way out, but instead of trashing them you can give them new lives as tiny greenhouses. posted by LinuxH4x0r on May 26, 2008 Growing Your Own Miracle Fruit A guide to help anyone willing to grow the exotic and highly rewarding Miracle Fruit. posted by Putzer on Jun 27, 2007 Shoot the Rainbow: Skittles Vodka Loved Skittles as a kid and want to enjoy the flavors in a new way now that you're an adult? Skittles vodka may be just the thing for you. posted by applesticker on May 27, 2008 Dell Laptop into Digital Photo Frame That outdated laptop may be too slow for your new applications, but it can still serve as a sweet photo frame. posted by vorin on May 24, 2008 Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Instructables Internship Days 5-6 (Including the weekend!)

Hi everyone,Sorry I didn't post on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday, but I'll make up for that now.So, Friday:I arrived at Squid Labs knowing that today was a special day. Today would be the day that construction on Proj. X would commence. Jason and I layed out the materials and began building, taking pictures every step on the way. We assembled the main component by lunch time, and installed about 66% of the other components by the end of the day. Noah helped us out a bunch, figuring out where certain components should go and how to attach others to the "mainframe."The (construction) work environment at Squid Labs is awesome! We pretty much just dragged our materials outside and started working. You really can do whatever you want, whenever you want; it's truly amazing. I'm pretty sure that Today was the day that I realized how much I'd be willing to drop out of school and just work for Instructables. I don't really think it's a great idea, but I'd certainly be happy working full-time for Instructables, no doubt about it!I really didn't do much else today, Jason and I pretty much just worked on the.... on Proj. X (Caught myself, whew!) all day!Now, onto the weekend!Friday, Billy and I decided that we would go into the city (San Francisco) via BART/Bike on Saturday. Saturday has come, and it's finally time for me to go to S.F.After Christy dropped off Billy and I (with our bikes) at the BART station, we rode BART all the way to the city. Christy also gave us 2 tickets to go to the S.F. MOMA, which was awesome. There was this one drawing that I really, really liked. Unfortunately, I can't remember the artist or the title of the work, although I'm pretty sure it's entitled, "Untitled." There was also this really odd exhibit, which was...just generally odd. Imagine a house. Now, rip all of the walls out of the house, rotate the whole structure that you ripped out equally over the X and Y axis, and then shove it through the walls of MOMA.... yeah, it was pretty damn weird. Then they guy drilled and off-center hole in a record and that was playing on a timer, so it went really fast, then slow, etc etc. In the next room, there were about 20 pictures of what we just saw... Again... just odd.Anyway, after MOMA, I decided that it would be really awesome to see the Golden Gate Bridge, so Billy and I rode our bikes down toward the piers, and we'd then take "The Embarcadero" to the bridge. So, as we were passing Pier 39, my left pedal stripped out of its socket, leaving me no way to "bike" to the Bridge. Luckily, it broke off at pier 39, which just-so-happened to be a "tourist pier." Billy and I hung out there for most of the day. During lunch we "fed" a bunch of birds; pigeons, little birds, and a really mean seagull...After we realized that we would have to walk all the way back to the BART station, we started on our journey back. Awesomely, on the way, we came upon a really tranquil-looking park and a square with a huge, awesome sculpture. The sculpture had a bunch of gigantic concrete "square tubes" that jutted out of its huge base. There was water flowing out of almost everything, and steppingstones that allowed the viewer to walk underneath the immense structure. The only two words that I could describe it with are simply awesome.We arrived back at the original BART station, Christy picked me up, we ate dinner, and went back home.Sunday:Sunday was just awesome. Mitch and Erica took me Surfing with Mike, Jason, and Jason's Sister. Although the waves were small, it was a beautiful day, and we had an awesome time. For lunch, Awesome Mike brought his mini-propane grill and we had hot-dogs on the beach. After lunch, we went back into the water to surf a bit more and then left. Surfing was a blast!Back at "home," we watched "Sunshine," a sci-fi movie about a team of scientist/astronauts on a mission to deliver a bomb into their dying sun, to create a new sun within the old. Most of the movie was actually pretty good, but I thought the ending just... sucked outright. I won't ruin it for you, but you really don't need to see the movie. During the movie, though, Christy whipped up some Rhubarb Pie! YAY!Back to work - MondayYesterday, in the morning I made the "How to Create Homepage Images" Instructable, which I suggest you check out if you want to contribute to the website's homepage. We're giving you the opportunity to make homepage images that we'll actually use on the homepage... if they're good enough ;). After, Jason and I pretty much finished up Proj. X, but we will require some time in the afternoon on Tuesday to finalize construction. This thing is going to be AWESOME!In other news, Billy and I are going to "The Googleplex" tomorrow (Tuesday) to give a small talk with Christy, which I'm really excited for. At first I didn't expect that they'd want interns to go talk to Google, but Christy and Eric explained why they want us to go. Google wants the opinions of the users. Billy and I promise to speak well of everyone, and speak on everyone's behalf. I've gotta go, we're leaving soon!Cheers,-Muffinatorp.s. I burned my PB and Banana sandwich again v_v...

Posted by T3h_Muffinator 11 years ago


Looking for a cheap compressor with a high pressure rating or for airbrush use?

Today a friend of mine asked me if I know a way to reduce the noise level of his compressor in the work shed. With the current heat he prefers to work in the evening and nights, which does not make his neighbours too happy. His main use for several airbrush guns and sometimes for mormal airtools or the big spray gun for an undercoat or similar. So his main concern is oil in the airline and the actual flow rate is of second concern as he has an old 25kg propane cyclinder as an additional air tank. For relative low air volumes I would suggest an old fridge compressor. With a thicker pipe at the outlet that is filled with stainless steel wool most of the oil stays in the compressor. That is if this pipe is a) long enough b) upright c) of sufficient diameter so there is enough for the oil to avoid it being pushed up A second, standard oil seperator will be enough for the oil level required for airbrush stuff - and most other things too. If there is no pressure regulator on the airbrush system it is best to add a small air tank and shut off valve for it. In our case however a fridge compressor would be just enough to keep the bigger airbrush gun running but not to fill the tank at the same time. Not to mention the problem of fluctuating pressure levels. Since we already had a tank and pressure shut off connected to the loud compressor it was only a matter of finding something that keeps the neighbours happy. The first thing we did was to check how often the compressor comes on and how long it runs till the tank is back to pressure. With that and the stated air volume on the compressor we guesstimated that something a bit bigger than the compressor of a window airconditioner should be sufficient. The search begins.... If you don't know what to look for I give you a few hints: Older airconditioners often run on R22 or R12 - both use quite high system pressures which is a bonus, but more on that later. As a rule of thumb for these compressors you cans say: the bigger the higher the flow rate. At the local wreckers and scrap yards we found a few units but noticed the bigger ones often used three phases and not just one :( So we opted for the R22 compressor of a 4.5kW unit. Keep in mind the 4.5kW is for the entire system, so the quite massive fans can be removed from the sum. Usually the compressor alone is the 2.5 - 3kW range. Ok, we found the big thing but how does this help us? First things first ;) The oil was removed as the housing stating the original oil amount. This allowed us to use an oil rated for air use that has little to no water absorption qualities - you don't want water in your compressor. With the usual heat the water should be no problem anyway. Next was a pressure test to make sure the thing actually still works, so we added some plumping in the form of standard connectors to the inlet and outlet. We got well above 200PSI and abondoned the test at this stage as it was more than enough already. The air volume seemd to be well more than expected too so let'S move to the next stage. A fridge or aircon compressor always needs to have a certain amount of oil in it as it will otherwise seize and overheat quickly. But they are also designed so that the oil mixes with the refrigerant to cool all moving parts. So the biggest hurdle is to make sure the oil stays where it should stay and won't enter or get lost in the tank. Only real option for this to use something to catch the oil that is capable of releasing it into the compressor once it shuts off. Now there are several options for this so I start with the most basic: A "catch can" will get most of the oil, especially if filled with stainless steel wool or similar. Downside is that you have to find a way to get it back into the compressor. A step better is a thicker pipe filled with stainless steel wool to catch the oil. If placed upright and the outgoing pipe can be bend a bit upwards you have a good chance that most of the oil will sweep through the valves and get back down into the compressor housing. But only too often the cheap or even free compressor is better than expected and the oil won't get back into the housing as the vlaves are just too good. The last and IMHO best option is a pressurised return system. Most compressors for bigger aircons have a seperate filling port or sealed off piece of pipe. In this case you can do a simple check to see if they are usable for our purposes. Open the port of pipe and use a simple bike bump or similar to get some pressure in it. With a dedicated oil filling port you are best off but they are hard to find. The air you pump in should come out of the high pressure side - you might need a little pressure to overcome the valves. If you hear any bubbling in the housing (use a pipe on your ear or a sensitive microphone) it means you are going through the oil inside the compressor - perfect! You might not hear any bubbling but the port or pipe is still usable. Get ready with your fingers and start the compressor. The fill pipe should be sucking air in, same for the service port if there is one. A dedicated oil port should not suck but instead force some oil up if you cover the high pressure outlet. I assume all is good and no oil is splashing out of the open pipe or port. Add a small amount of oil with a syringe or similar into the port/pipe. If you see an oil mist coming out of the high side it is bad news. Clean outlet air is good. To get the oil back from the catch pipe or can we have to add a hose or pipe with a needle valve. It needs to be adjusted so that there is only a very little airflow (or oil mist) coming out. This regulated outlet is now being connect to the port/pipe with a bit of suction that we found earlier. Now every time the compressor runs the collected oil is forced back into the compressor :) Please double check the port/pipe used is not directly connected to the intake port! The last thing you want is a puddle of oil going into the cylinder and damaging it! They are designed to move gas but not liquid! If in doubt use a hardened sttel nail or similar to create a small puncture in the top of the compressor housing if there is nothing else to use. Check first if the material sound very thick, if so it might help to drill with a 5 or 6mm drill first - only about 1mm to make sure you won't enter the housing and conimate it with metal shavings! Once you have a small puncture hole of about 2mm in diameter get some 2 component metal repair glue mix and add a suitable connection for the collecting pipe/can. If you feel up to it you can of course use a blow torch and solder the connection on. Now we have the compressor working with a oil return system that also gives up very little to no oil at all in our system. You might now think you are good to go but you should at least add a decent and fine filter to the air inlet ;) The compressor noise of a bigger system can still be an issue if thicker pipes are used that allow the noise to travel out. Keep in mind they usually run in a fully closed system.... As we only need to match the noise level of the compressor itself a solid steel can like an old fire extinguisher in the 1kg rage is a good way out. Fill it with filter wool and a fine filter pad after adding some hose connectors either end. You can misuse the trigger nozzle and keep it to seal the top if you braze a connector on it. If the intake here is about 5 times larger than the pipe connection to the compressor itself the air flow going into the thing is low enough for a cheap paper air filter can or box if you have a quite dusty enviroment to work with. The real trick is to have a hose or pipe on the inside of the fire extinguisher connected to the compressor pipe connection. A garden hose is great here as is reduces the noise quite good and is dirt cheap. Make a lot of about 2mm sized holes in this pipe and close the other end of it off. Now the compressor will suck it through the small holes and the soft garden hose reduces the noise, the surrounding padding brings it down to basically nothing. The special case of clean air for airbrush.... If you read this for the sole purpose of airbrush use then this chapter is just for you, all other might want to skip it. The two things you don't want to enter your gun is oil or water. Both are a common thing in normal compressors due to lubrication and pressure difference resulting in condensation of the humidity in the intake air. Oil free compressors of good quality can cost quite a few bucks and often require ongoing replacement of membranes or piston seals. A refrigeration compressor with the above modifications already provides clean enough air for most airbrush users if a proper tank is used to store enough of the compressed air. So you might just want to add a basic oil filter or very fine paper filter close to the regulator. For very detailed work with very sensitive paints you might want to build a filter box containing of several layers of oil absorbent paper. This stuff is often used in the industry to clean up minor oil spills and bind oil very well. A PVC pipe (pressure rated please) with 5-8 layers of filter screens should last about a lifetime before the filters need changing if the diameter is in the 10-15cm range. That leaves us with the dreaded problem of condensation and water contamination. Depending on the type of paint and gun used a small amount of water vapour is usually no problem. Solvent based paints usally show their disliking by unwanted drops or run offs caused by water droplets. Of course you just go and buy a professional dehumidifier and accept the ongoing replacement costs for the cartridges... But if you are in a climated that has above 30% humidity for most of the year than you will have to remove the water one way or the other. A big enough storage tank for the air that is upright usually helps to release any condensated water prior to usage. But if you use a homemade tank you might want to avoid this problem completely and forget about water in the system altogehter. Silaca gel is the answer here, specifically the indicating variety that changes color once "full". A spaghetti glas or similar should be big enough unless you are in a very humid climate - is so just use multiple in a row. The air intake side for the compressor has to go through the silica gel to be effictive. This mean we need two holes in the lid. One with a pipe or hose going all the way to the botom - that is the air intake side. The other right on the lid - this is the air outlet side which continues to the compressor intake. With the color change in the silica gel we can estimate how much usage we have left until we have to heat it up to remove the water. If this color change happens quite fast from the bottom to the top, let's say within three days or less than you really need to use more jars with silica gel in a row or a longer one - like using a long and clear acrylic pipe instead. Of course you can always just cut holes and "viewing glasses" along the length to a PVC pipe.... No matter how wet your climate is you want to get at least 100 hours of compressor run time before you need to recharge the silica gel. This brings us to the recharging.... Once the color changes and you only have about one quarter left to the top you want to get the water out of the gel and re-use it. To do this you simply heat it up in your oven to around 120-150°C - the supplier should state the max temp for this. If you use a gas oven or one with limited accuracy here it is best to stay within the 120° range. You need to stir and mix the gel or use something big enough like an oven tray. But be aware that these little balls are like glass! The roll and bounce like no tomorrow! IMHO it best to use an old cooking pot that has no plastic handles for this and not to overfill it. This allows for easy mixing without making a mess that might cause a bad trpping hazard on your kitchen floor tiles! Once the gel is back to original colr it is time to let it cool of to a safe temperature and to fill it back into our canister or pipe. Tanks and shut off systems.... We have a refrigeration compressor working for us, and since it was for R22 we can use much higher pressures as a simple compressor from the hardware store. The low pressure side is used to 70PSI or around 5Bar of pressure in normal working conditions. The high side often works at pressure in the range of 200-300PSI or 14-20Bar! The tank we used is a big propane tank that was restamped at some stage in his life for the use of LPG - so it was tested to quite high pressures. The lower pressure limit is what keeps the stored gas liquid at the given temperature. For Propane at an imaginary 30°C this would around 155PSI or 10Bar. The stamped test pressure, although outdated, showed 600PSI or around 40Bar of pressure with no problems - and the thing was thick in the walls... The old shut off switch from an old air compressor was adjustable after removing the safety cap with a bit of force and the help of few cold beer. With a little tank attached we adjusted it to turn the compressor off at 250PSI or around 17Bar of pressure. If your tank is old or has no test pressure stamped on do your own test in a safe location. Make sure the area is secured so there is no chance of debris from a brusting tank can go anywhere - this includes to chain down the tank itself ;) Use the aircon compressor to fill it up to 300PSI or 20Bar of pressure - this should be tolerated with ease by any propane or LPG tank. Shut the valves and let it rest for a day or so. It is best to do this in the early morning so the heat from the day will slightly increase the pressure. At the end you still want to have a working tank and no major pressure losses. All of our mods on this tank were done without actually harming the tank. This was possible as the original valve had a release port for filling purposes - as it standard on most refillable ones. Here we removed the valve and added a pressure guage instead - better to know what is happening than to assume things. As this "port" had a seperate connection to the bottom of the brass valve we added as T-connection to allow for the connection to the compressor. Just be be really sure a thin piece of copper tubing was brazed to the exit hole of this port so all incoming air will be going down and away from the outlet connection with the big shut off valve on top - which we use to actually isolate and close the tank when not it use. Last thing required was something to connect the pressure shut off switch and regulator to. That was the only major expense on this project as we had no old BBQ hose or similar to get a suitable connector to the tank. We bought a simple adapter for the use of smaller hoses and cut the unwanted bits off we there was only the bottle conntector with the nut left. After removing the rubber ring we brazed piece of copper pipe onto it. Here we drilled holes and fitted severy connectors. First for the pressure switch, then for the connection to the pressure regulator and two standard ones with a ball valve for air hose connections. One air hose connection female, the other male so a standard compressor can be connected as well or "backfilled" for additional and mobile storage use. As we wanted to avoid any reduction in the safety and burst pressure no release valve was added at the bottom on the tank. The added silica gel filter stage was used instead so no water will get into the system to begin with. Additionally, and painfully for me and me friend, the inside of the tank was coated with a layer of acrylic paint to prevent and rust as it was free from it when we checked it at the beginning. This involved filling a suitable amount of paint into it, closing the top while keeping the thread clean and then to move the tank around to cover the inside evenly. If you do this be prepared for some weird movements with your friends LOL Once we were sure all ust be covered by paint at least three times we released the exxess paint and allowed the inside to dry with the assistance of some air forced to go in with a length of pipe. This was repeated 3 times... Then another two just for the bottom third of it where there might be some moisture after all... Now you don't want to remove the brass valve with everything connected to it just to turn the tank over to releae the collected water. Instead we made sure the added pipe on the former relese port would go all the way to the bottom of the tank. If any water collection is suspected only the connection to the compressor needs an additional valve for the disconnection so the water will be force back out here. To make this easy and fast we used standard quick connectors and a piece of flexible airhose rated to 20bar of pressure for the connection to the compressor. We checked the performance of the moisture removal and oil removal only for a few hours of running time while priming some surface for later use. The compressor oil used was very smelly to say it nice but nothing coul be smelled in the first paper filter after the pressure regulator. To check for remaining moisture levels (65% humidity in the house) we used a 10m length of clear PVC tubing going through an ice bath. After 30 minutes of moderate air release there was no condensation on the inside of the tubing visible. Of course if you only need it for air supply and don't care about a bit of moisture and oil you can keep it simple ;) Benefits of doing such a stupid thing: For starters noise and the peace of mind that you can do a lot of airbrushing until the compressor needs to kick in again. Then of course the benefit of an almost silent system compared to a standard compressor - something you can actually tolerate while doing art. But the real deal is knowing YOU did it and you did it for cheap. Warnings and some advise... I know, it should be at the very beginning but I just hope you read till the end ;) If the compressor fails from overheating you are up for a new one. This means the tan size should be within the limits of what the compressor can handle - same for what you actually use on air. You want an empty tank to be filled before the compressor feels hot to touch - quite warm is fine but if you can't leave your hand on it then it is too hot. Same story for the usage. There is no point in using a tiny 10 liter storage tank if you need that capacity every few minutes. The compressor would only have little pauses and overheat quickly. You want a good balance of usage time before the tank goes below supply pressure and running time of the compressor to get it to full pressure again. This brings us to the safety of high pressures. Where possible only copper tubing or sufficiently rate hoses should be used, the later as short as possible to avoid them acting like a whip if something goes wrong. When it comes to the safety of the tank you want to make sure to stay withing it's rated limits. All benefits of a compressor capable of producing over 500PSI otr close to 35Bar is wasted if your tank and pressure regulator can't handle it. This must not mean that you try to use a gas cylinder of unknow age and pressure rating and assume it will work! If in doubt use a lower shut off pressure and stay within the limits of normal air compressors - which is around 120PSI or 8Bar. Never, ever use a tank that is compromised by inside rust or bad corrosion on the outside! If you don't know how to braze copper tubing, pipes and connectors then check out some of the great Instructables about it! Whenever you know you won't use any compressed air for more than a few hours close all valves especially the ones going back to the compressor on the high pressure side! Some compressors really don't like a huge pressure difference constantly pushing on the reed valves. If your tank is big enough to allow for more than one hour of operation before the compressor has to top it up you might want to consider a one way valve right on the compressor outlet. This will prevent any massive pressures going onto the valves - especially helpful for modern compressors that only rely on the sealing capabilities of the clyinders or rotary system used. One thing you should always consider is a pressure relief valve rated for about 50PSI more than your tank pressure - it can be added to the pipe ;) If the shut off valve ever fails the relief valve gives you the ease of mind that it will blow before your tank does. Maintenance... If modded correctly the compressor should stay in the compressor and the compressor itself should not overheat from use. Having said that your compressor might force out a little more than your best catch system can handle. If that becomes a problem it might help to use an oil with a lower viscosity. If all fails it just means you need to top up oil once the last last paper filter is filthy or use slightly more to begin with so the intervals are longer. The silica gel, if used should be recharged before all of it is wasted - no point in adding it if you use it once full of water. If no gel is used there will be water in the storage tank. Even with the added paint and a good air filter it is possible that nasty things grow in there. Making sure the tank is emptied of any water after long uses and again before the next use is good practise. If no pressure gauge is used on the tank you must make sure the shut off valve is always working fine and within set parameters. I strongly recommend using a gauge and if not to perform a pressure check of the system every now and then to confirm all is within parameters of normal operation. A compressor constantly running means you either use far too much air or you have a leak - same story if the compressos kicks in after some of forgetting to shut it off and close the valves. If you keep the above in mind the salvaged compressor should work just fine for many years to come. Troubleshooting and alternatives.... You put everything together the right way, double checked and something is till not right? Maybe my crystal ball helps me to find something... 1. Always oil coming through the catch system. It usually means you use too much of it. A salvaged compressor, if the refrigent was removed legally from the system should still have a "correct" level of oil inside. Too much oil would mean is being pumped through the system at an excessive rate. Very thin compressor oils tend to do that in the compressor is misude like we do. Changing to standard mineral oil can help here. As a last resort you can use a pressure gauge or good judgement to allow more flow through the needle valve from the catch system back to the compressor. Too much backflow here would mean we loose system pressure to the set level of this needle valve! 2. The R22 rated compressor seems to be unable to produce enough pressure. First do a leak test using soapy water to rule out any leaks. Do a back pressure test on the ports. If you can push air through them in the reverse way with ease it means the valves are damaged making the compressor useless. You need to replace it. A regular cause with our type of usage is a constand back pressure from the storage tank to the compressor. To prevent this it might help to mount an electric solenoid between the compressor and storage tank. Such valve should be off when the pressure switch is engaged and on when the pressure switch is disengaged. This prevents the coil from overheating but requires a "normally off" type of valve. A good source at the wreckers are cars with LPG systems installed, they usually have suitable 12V valves somewhere on or near the tank and filler cap. 3. I am using several kg of silica gel but still get a lot of water in my storage tank. Going overboard in a humid climate can be a good thing here but if moisture makes it into the tank even with great amounts of silica gel there are only two causes: a) the tube or cylinder used is not long enough or not wide enough to allow the absorption of all the moisture going through. b) the flow rate is too high and the temperatures are too. For the first the solution is obvious enough. The second is related to the first for the diameter and lenght but temperatures constantly above the 30°C while operating somehow limits what the gel can do. Using a cooling coil on the intake side or simply putting the gel containers in icy water will help to a great deal here. If that is not an option than I suggest to layer the gel and to seperate it with fine paper filter screens. This will slow and even out the airflow allowing for more contact time with the gel. 4. The compressor gets very noisy after some time. If "some time" means more than 30-45 minutes you simply have it running too much and it overheats. If the noise increases too much when reaching the shut off pressure it can mean the pressure is too high for it. 5. Can I use multiple compressors from smaller units or refrigerators to get enough air volume? Of course you can but it might mean you have to lower your pressure expectations. Consider that each individual compressor would get the back pressure from all other compressors running while it's outlet valve is closed. To avoid premature failure you want to make sure the compressors are shut off at a lowver pressure. 6. I don't want to use a big tank but require a good airflow for airbrush. Two or three fridge compressors working one after the other with a small tank to keep the output pressure even can allow for about 30 minutes runtime per compressor. With three it gives one hour for the the first to cool off and should be enough for ongoing work. Downside is you need to make some sort of automatic switch to "rotate" to compressor working. Last words.... Is you find any spelling mistakes you can keep them. However, if you use them in any way to make a profit with them I kindly ask for 10% of your earning from it ;) Why did I not make an Instructable out of all this? Well the day was very hot, the beer very cold and my mobile phone at home, so I did not take any pics. To top it up the whole thing is now in a seperate box for additional noise reduction so it can be used in the same room where the guy is working. Of course he just used a nailgun for the job without any regard of access or at least easy view of the two pressure gauges. Typical if you have a great idea and the cold beer tells you to forget all about screws or hinges ROFL Only comment was: You created it and it works fine, why would need more than the pipe connections for the gel and regulator? Maybe he will reconsider when the service is due....

Posted by Downunder35m 1 year ago