Functional intra nasal prosthesis

A patient had a malignant cancerous tumor removed from the nasal anatomy and is now left with no nose and no internal nasal structures that normally would filter, warm and humidify the inspirated air. Can anyone design a mini air conditioner that is light weight, safe to use, easy to clean, and affordable? If you do, then you can patent your device, and will probably be the first to ever create such a device. While there is no monetary reward, you would probably become known in the international medical community, and your device could be developed and marketed through the usual channels. As for me, I have nothing to gain. Its just that I am trying to help some colleagues who are now faced with this challenge. Anyone?

Posted by Darilatkins 4 years ago


attaching the prosthetic

One of the biggest challenges has been figuring out a low cost easy to DIY way to attach the prosthetic to the child's remaining limb. Please share any thoughts, information or ideas you might have.

Posted by CarliPierce 9 years ago


Dolphin Gets Prosthetic Tail

This dolphin was just a couple months old when it got caught in a trap and turned its tail into a useless stump. After a year and a half of recovery and building, she now has a prosthetic tail and has been swimming about with it. Nice. Link

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Tentacular awesomeness pushes limits of body image

From The Design Blog, via NOTCOT: Pushing the boundaries of current upper-limb prosthetic design, designer Kaylene Kau has created a prosthetic arm that supports the dominant functioning hand in accomplishing day-to-day tasks with ease and efficiency. Featuring a flexible design, the prosthetic arm adjusts to allow a variety of different grips to hold a variety of objects with minimum fuss. The Prosthetic Arm also integrates motors and cables, which help the user control the amount of arm curls required for different tasks. Presenting a simple yet effective design, the new prosthetic limb makes users self-reliant, as they can carry out their everyday tasks without any assistance. Of course, any advances in prosthetics is welcome, but I bet the first thoughts of most people reading this here were either Cool!  I could be an octopus! or Woah - I want one of those on my next Hallowe'en costume! I'd really like to see a video of it in action - I can't decide if it would be cool or creepy. I also imagine that an arm like this would be (relatively) easy to engineer for the amateur.

Posted by Kiteman 7 years ago


gripper toy/prosthetic prototype

Well its a simple cycle brake (side pull single pivot,brake pads removed) inserted in a glove that can be used to grab objects. The initial idea was to build on it further and have the brake lever fitted under the armpit such that when the arm is moved towards the body the lever gets pulled and the grip tightens to grab objects for persons who might be missing part of the hand from below the elbow. However didn't get any further for various reasons, would be very happy if anyone would find it useful.

Posted by Freddy Francis 4 years ago


Another step towards human cyborgs - the finger drive.

A Finnish computer programmer who lost one of his fingers in a motorcycle accident has made himself a prosthetic replacement with a USB drive attached.Jerry Jalava uses the 2GB memory stick, accessed by peeling back the "nail", to store photos, movies and programmes.The finger is not permanently attached to his hand, so it can be easily left plugged into a computer when in use.Mr Jalava says he is already thinking about upgrading the finger to include more storage and wireless technology."I'm planning to use another prosthetic as a shell for the next version, which will have removable fingertip and RFID tag," he wrote on his blog, ProtoBlogr.net.Half of Mr Jalava's left ring finger had to be amputated last summer after he crashed into a deer while riding his motorbike near Helsinki.He says he was inspired to create the unique storage device when doctors treating him joked that he should have a USB "finger drive" after finding out that he was a software developer. More is apparently available on the inventor's blog, but it keeps timing out for me.BBC story

Posted by Kiteman 9 years ago


Embedded joystick in Laptop

Hey guys :) On November 22nd I had a bike accident in which I got my left hand caught in my front disc rotor and I lost my ring finger, pinky and top middle finger. I've had my middle finger and pinky reattached, but my pinky is permanently pinned so im getting it off anyways... Basically i'm an extremely avid biker riding trials, dh, freeride and slopestyle, My other passion is my computers and newly arduino and robotics. Im new to arduino though and do not have enough experience to take on this project (Plus the amount of morphine i'm on doesnt help either :P   ) Since I have no effective ring or pinky finger I cannot do my excessive gaming on my laptop (As any 16yr old...), For christmas I got a Razer Nostromo allowing me to game again but not very portable as I use and am getting a gaming laptop (Celvo P170EM) The laptop has 2 hdd bays, so I was thinking about using a PSP joystick in the left alt key space.  How could I go about connecting it to the motherboard or internal USB? To act as either analog or digital joystick?  Would this be able to convert into all games as a form of W,S,A,D keys or Arrow Keys? How expensive would it be? And what are the chances someone can make this for me and I can simply install it and solder it to the inside usb legs? Im not sure of how hard it is to build this into the 2.5" hdd bay, I'd prefer not to take up the whole bay and if even be able to keep whatever the minimal chip and wires in a space in the case. I know this is a lot to ask considering I cant do it myself and I do not have the laptop to say where good spaces are. But I would appreciate any and all help or ideas, thanks :)

Posted by aldovisini 5 years ago


Collaboration between ModSquad and OpenProsthetics?

Hello! I'm curious whether the ModSquad group has contacted, or explored collaboration with, the Open Prosthetics Project. While the idea of an inexpensive and colorful cosmetic prosthesis is excellent, I wonder whether it might be possible to develop a somewhat functional, while still inexpensive, prosthetic arm as well.For children, it might not need have the complexity or range of motion the OPP is aiming for, but even something might be useful.

Posted by kelseymh 9 years ago


Chuck Messer of Tackle Design and The Open Prosthetics Project on Smash Lab

I finally got a chance to watch the sneak preview of Discovery's new Smash Lab* last night, and imagine my surprise to see someone I know hosting! Chuck Messer, one of the four Smash Lab hosts, is a partner at Tackle Design the people behind the The Open Prosthetics Project, which also has an Open Prosthetics group on Instructables. Tackle Design and my own Squid Labs shared many similarities, so Chuck and I would share stories about how we each ran the companies; he even managed to visit Squid Labs when we were still located in Emeryville (pre-control tower). It's great to see good people getting wider recognition, and I wish Chuck and Smash Lab success!disclosure - Discovery is an advertiser on Instructables, and has been advertising for Smash Lab. This is not part of their advertising.

Posted by ewilhelm 10 years ago


Plastic Soda Bottle Prosthesis

Prosthethic arms for land-mine victims, etc. War, land mines, and natural disasters create far too many amputees each year, especially in the developing world.  Worse, prosthetic limbs are expensive and hard to come by.  The Center for International Rehabilitation, posting under Instructables username CIRNetwork, has been working to find sustainable solutions:  locally available materials worked by local craftsmen.   Their plastic soda bottle prosthesis is one clear, simple solution to this problem:  a plastic bottle is heat-shrunk to cover a plaster cast of the limb stump.  Different devices can be attached to the end of the bottle, enabling the wearer to perform basic daily tasks.  This type of thing can really make a difference.  Check out the video below, and see more on the CIRNetwork YouTube channel. Want to help?  CIR is seeking donations of mobility aids to support ongoing rehabilitation relief efforts in Haiti.  You can also make general donations to assist people with disabilities worldwide. This post has been sponsored by Pepsi. The Pepsi Refresh Project celebrates the people, businesses, and non-profits with ideas that will have a positive effect on our world.

Posted by canida 8 years ago


Meet the Boy With the Lego Hand

When Coby Unger makes, he makes the world a better place. The Atlantic recently published an article about the artist in residence and his work to build better prosthetics for children. Unger worked with a boy named Aiden Robinson to dream up the swiss army knife of prosthetics with attachments that include a Wii controller, spoon, legos, and a bow for playing the violin. Check out more of Coby's projects, and read the article to learn more about Aiden, the boy with the Lego hand. 

Posted by tinaciousz 3 years ago


Eyeborg: Filmaker plans to install camera in prosthetic eyeball

"Take a one eyed film maker, an unemployed engineer, and a vision for something that's never been done before and you have yourself the EyeBorg Project. Rob Spence and Kosta Grammatis are trying to make history by embedding a video camera and a transmitter in a prosthetic eye. That eye is going in Robs eye socket, and will record the world from a perspective that's never been seen before."I'm hoping that the eyeball video camera will pave the way for more prosthetic eye hacks. I've want to embed a laser diode into a prosthetic eye for some time now, and just haven't had a candidate who will volunteer their eye. Common Instructables community - how many of you with one eye out there will let me help you become Cyclops!?!Filmmaker plans "Eyeborg" eye-socket camera | ReutersEye Spy: Filmmaker Plans to Install Camera in His Eye Socket | WIREDMore at eyeborgblog.com.via benjaneer

Posted by noahw 9 years ago


Toys/ Materials

Originally Mod Squad was born out of the idea to use donated toys to create prosthetic arms because there is an over abundance of them in the US, they are fairly low cost, they provide a variety of materials, and children would enjoy the way they look as opposed to more industrial materials. However a big concern is their durability. Share your thoughts/findings/suggestions about using toys. Are there other existing materials that are easy to access and would be good to re-use but would also make something that a child would like?

Posted by CarliPierce 9 years ago


Gripper toy/Prosthetic Prototype

Well its a simple cycle brake (side pull single pivot,brake pads removed) inserted in a glove that can be used to grab objects. The initial idea was to build on it further and have the brake lever fitted under the armpit such that when the arm is moved towards the body the lever gets pulled and the grip tightens to grab objects for persons who might be missing part of the hand from below the elbow. However didn't get any further for various reasons, would be very happy if anyone would find it useful.

Posted by Freddy Francis 4 years ago


Congratulations on SciAm Article

Since no one here has done so yet, I thought I'd post congratulations to the members of the Open Prosthetics Project for their article in the October 2008 Scientific American.

Posted by kelseymh 9 years ago


White House #weekofmaking

Coby Unger is at the White House and the Faire today representing Instructables, so say hi if you see him! He's there with 9-year-old Aidan Robinson to present their amazing collaboration: the superhero arm. (If you've never seen this 'ible I promise you'll be inspired by it: a playful prosthetic arm that's designed to grow with its wearer, and that supports interchangeable, task-specific attachments to help Aidan not only do everyday tasks but also play his favorite games.) Are you planning any projects for the White House's #weekofmaking, or maybe even going to D.C. Maker Faire?

Posted by Neepha 3 years ago


Discreet prosthetic arm: A Steampunk nonsense?

I love steampunk aesthetics, in both machines and clothing (I'm meaning girls) branches... but I have no artistic talent at all, so I can't develop such a beautiful machines or decorations. But sometimes steampunk fans care a lot about clothes and less about characters. They simply dress up, and waste the chance to assume a character, especially at conventions and meetings. There are lots of steampunk prosthetic-mechanical arms and hands, but I can't avoid think about "less are more". I mean, a mechanical arm in brass, cooper  and leather talks about your wit and ability, but a (simple) wired frame UNDER the jacket, apparent only by bumps and tensions under the sleeve and glove, and even better with mechanical wishpers and quiet pneumatic sounds when it moves (if you are so gifted), tells a story about the character of your character (if you understand me): for example, an inventor who has lost the use of an arm, may try to recover it and keep it hidden, like a shame. You can link it with an accident, a tragedy, a heroic act or a sacrifice. It would be part of my character, If I would had one. BUT steampunk is all about aesthetic, so... is it a nonsense? Or is it a second-level, deeper dive in the steampunk world?

Posted by infob 6 years ago


Pepsi Refresh Submission

Please cast your vote for the CIR's Pepsi Refresh submission to Provide Cost-Effective Prosthetic Care in Underserved Midwestern Areas - http://pep.si/eo57my Video for the submission is available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7gVKMypR7E

Posted by CIRnetwork 7 years ago


Featured Author Interview: marshon

Hello! I recently had the opportunity to interview marshon. If you have any more questions that you would like him to answer, here's the place to do it! Check out his interview here!

Posted by Penolopy Bulnick 12 months ago


Lifecasting

Hey I'm new but I really LOVE the website. I just had one quick question could someone show me how to do a lifecast of a human head. I'm a theatre major and I'd love to get involved in special effects but I'm starting on my own. Any help would be great. :)

Posted by twalton1 7 years ago


Coming Soon: Health by Design Contest

Coming soon to Instructables.com: the Health by Design Contest! We want to see any Instructable that can promote a healthy lifestyle or make life easier for those whose lives have been changed by injury, sickness, or a disability. This contest is open to all sorts of Instructables. Promote activity with an inexpensive bit of exercise equipment, make a prosthetic limb, mod a wheelchair, it's totally up to you. Prizes and more info to come soon.

Posted by fungus amungus 8 years ago


Questions about Magnets

Can an electro magnet have more gauss than a neodymium of the same size?  I was just thinking about robots and advanced prosthetics. One issue with them is they require rather bulky motors to get the lifting and holding capacity we often require. So if power wasn't an issue and you could make a small elecro magnet that has more gauss/a stronger magnetic field than a neodymium magnet. Than we could make strong and smaller motors.  Just a thought. Discuss!

Posted by mpilchfamily 4 years ago


Fixperts - Designers doing something useful!

I was recently alerted to Fixperts.org. It's a fascinating concept - "real" designers get paired with folk with actual, unsolved problems (typically related to a mobility issue), and produce bespoke solutions, making a nice little video in the process. Introduction to Fixperts from Billo on Vimeo. It's mainly a UK thing at the moment (some of the folk from Sugru are involved, although it's not a Sugru scheme), but there's nothing stopping you, dear reader, starting up something similar through your own school, college or Hackspace. There are even guidelines on the site on how to join in. I've been told of companies that make bespoke prosthetics, or connect problems to solutions, but this is the first voluntary group I've encountered that drags Design out of the showroom or gallery, directly to those who actually need these skills now. I'm going to keep an eye on Fixperts, and I think you ought to as well... @Fixperts

Posted by Kiteman 5 years ago


Hi!

Hi!Nobody has posted here and I'm curious if this project is active.I will be working on regiggering something to be a sort of myoelectric prosthetic. I don't have one yet as I'm still recovering, however I might as well think about how I could help the situation.I found a great hobbyist website, Spark Fun. From them I ordered an Arduino for $32.The Arduino is a n atmel microcontroller with a usb interface, allowing programming the chip and communication with the running program.For myoelectric control, voltages would be derived from skin voltages. I'm no physiologist, but if some muscle activity can be discerned from the (low voltage) input, it could be used.The PWM outputs are ready-made to control common servos, so a motor-operated claw could be controlled.With the arduino's ability for independent operation as well as interfacing to the computer to revise the microcontroller's software and reprogram, it should be fairly straightforward to achieve a custom controller for a robotic claw of sorts.Now, where do I get the claw (at a reasonable price)? Or, maybe it'd be better to custom design one?Stay tuned.

Posted by yerg2k 11 years ago


Attempting to make my own toe prosthesis...

Any helpful suggestions? I'll explain my situation: I have a partial right big toe amputation. basically, the entire tip end where the nail is supposed to be is gone, right to the joint, leaving me with a stubby, short half-toe. I've found some companies that will make realistic prosthetic toes, fingers, ears, etc, but the cost is too much for me. ($3000 for something with a life expectancy of only 2 -3 years!) I've decided to make my own using silicone. My plan is to make a mold of my sister's toe and fill it with silicone. I'll also mold my poor little stub, make a plaster replica of it, and stick it into the silicone-filled mold of my sister's toe. The idea is to custom-fit it to my toe. The parts that I'm finding difficult are painting it to look realistic, and also finding an acrylic nail large enough to pass as a large toenail. If anyone has any suggestions, or even a better method, please feel free to enlighten me! Thanks.

Posted by i_do_not_mow_lawns 11 years ago


A kind request: Google Science fair vote

I recently entered my Science Fair project in the Google Science Fair, an international science competition in which entrants can build, research, discover etc. anything they want to. For my entry, I researched on how prosthetic limbs can be controlled by thought alone and found that much of the mathematical analysis of the brainwave data had to be improved upon in order to make such a technology usable. Here is a brief synopsis, in case you were interested: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- My project is, at its most general level, based upon the idea of the brain-computer interface.In this sense of the definition, anything we use to interact with machines is a brain-computer interface, including our fingers. However, amputees often face difficulties after the loss of such a vital method of interaction. Through research, I found that a current medical device, the Electroencephalograph (EEG) could be implemented as a direct brain-machine interface; in other inputs on a computer (such as a cursor) could potentially be operated by thought alone. However, I also learned that, although EEG technology has been in existence since circa 1920, it still suffers from the age-old problems of signal filtration and desired feature extraction. This means that current signal processing algorithms are not able to interpret the electrical signals exhibited by neuronal synapses very efficiently, thus making such an interface wholly impractical and inaccurate. My project sought to rectify this through the creation of custom signal processing scenarios that utilized new algorithms; specifically, the use of Linear Discriminant Analysis and Vector quantization compression/extraction methods for enhanced noise filtration and the removal of known artifacts (sources of electricity other than the brain, such as muscles). However, I decided it was not enough to run software simulations; to determine its true real-world applicability, I used a 14- channel EEG neuroheadset to gather electrical data from my own brain. I then built a prototype robotic arm with an onboard processor that would translate signals from the computer. Finally, I used the programs I created to "decipher" the incoming brainwave signals, and send corresponding messages to the robotic limb. I concluded that, by using my programs to perform the signal processing, I was able to increase the accuracy of detected brainwave patterns by about 16%. Although this may not seem like much, the brain processes hundreds of thousands of ideas simultaneously, and recognizing patterns requires a great deal of processing effort on the part of the computer. Finally, I reached an accuracy of about 91.35% using the programs I created. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Further in-depth details can be seen here: http://sites.google.com/site/eegprosthetics/home Recently, after submitting my project, I was notified that I was one of the 60 semifinalists world-wide; as part of the judging process, there is also an award called the "People's Choice Award." Essentially, the public goes online and votes once in each of the 3 age groups (13-14, 15-16, 17-18) for the project they believe is the best. I am kindly asking if you would consider voting for my project for this award; I believe this project holds many potential applications in the real world other than prosthetics alone; such technology could be effectively utilized by patients with paraplegia, paralysis, or even polio. The voting process is simple: 1. Go the Google Science Fair Voting website: http://www.google.com/events/sciencefair/projects/eeg_and_prosthetics.html (for my project) 2. Click the "vote" button in the upper right-hand corner Again, thank you for your time and consideration of my project, Anand S

Posted by tech industries 7 years ago


Power genration by Foot steps

The main purpose of this Project is that to design a system that convert the mechanical energy harvested from human motion into electrical energy.This project report contains the complete literature review and implementation of an alternative to electrical power supplied by batteries for portable electronic devices and for computerized and motorized prosthetics. The report presents the idea to generate power harvesting from human motion. Electrical devices have been liberated from the wall socket. Battery powered computers, phones and music devices come along everywhere we go. The limiting factor is electricity. In the end the battery always goes dead. Ironically, when we move around with our portable devices we produce a lot of energy. But a lot of this energy is lost as heat. If that mechanical energy could be converted into electricity, our very mobility could charge our mobile devices. Using the working principal of dynamo, we intend to generate a small power which then can be used to charge the portable devices. We are charging mobile battery for testing purpose.

Posted by engr.zainshah 5 years ago


E-book: Cooking Material. Could molecular gastronomy help discover new matter?

AN INGREDIENT IS A MATERIAL! Using this e-book "Cooking Material", starting from your own familiarity with cooking, you’ll find inspiration to create material from a recipe. Please watch the book trailer (if you don't see the video, please click on this link) Is it possible to make dough with sawdust instead of flour? Caramelize glass crystals like sugar? Freeze-dry a string of wool so it resembles spaghetti? Today, industry innovation has made it possible to transform traditional materials into diverse states. Liquid wood for furniture manufacture, textile spray for auto interiors, and metallic foam for experimental prosthetics are all examples of familiar materials that have been altered into new, more efficient forms. Are these “special” recipes edible? Not at all! What is their use, then? For one, disseminating the elementary knowledge of chemical-physical reactions taking place in different materials, while maybe you will discover a wall plaster or a jewelry clay or something else useful—and allow your imagination to move freely. Molecular gastronomy adds scientific knowledge to our traditional cooking savoir-faire. This science allows to explore matter through new eyes: so grab you mixer and get cooking, get experimenting! E-book: Cooking Material. Could molecular gastronomy help discover new matter? on iTunes Store or Amazon.

Posted by humier 5 years ago


Wetsuit for 5 year old With fins/paddles

My nephew was born with severely clubbed feet, and lobster hands. After several surgeries he has ended up with with above the knee amputations, and tri-fingers with a very strong grasp. He receives intensive therapy and support, so he gets all the recreation he needs, plus occupational therapy. Well, he was recently introduced to a swimming pool and loves it. unfortunately, because of his amputations, he buoyancy is all screwed up. I would like to take a wet suit, and modify it to include a hard silicone leg prosthesis, and swim fins, and gloves that fit his fingers, with webbing, similar to what long distance endurance swimmers and navy seals use. I figure I can use off the shelf neoprene for the wet suit, and take very good measurements for the gloves. I have made patterns for outfits before, so I can layout the pieces, and have my wife or mother stitch them together. (they are great with sewing machines) For Bouyancy, I was toying with the idea of air bags made from cordura nylon and fillable from the outside with air attachment nozzles, and stitched inside the legs. They would be surrounded by hard plastic similar to the shape of his prosthetic legs he is getting used to. The torso of the wet suit would be stitched to the legs, so when his torso grew, I would cut along the seam, replace the torso as needed. Anything you guys think I am missing? I will start posting sketches and renderings as I get started on this project...

Posted by Lightcutter 11 years ago


Bio-mechanical electricity - 13W per knee.

A stroll around the park may soon be enough to charge the raft of batteries needed in today's power-hungry gadgets.US and Canadian scientists have built a novel device that effortlessly harvests energy from human movements.The adapted knee brace, outlined in the journal Science, can generate enough energy to power a mobile phone for 30 minutes from one minute of walking.A slow walk can generate an average of 5W of electricity, but they have models that will produce 13W - enough power for a one-minute stroll to provide half an hour of talk-time.The prototype makes you sound like an extra in Terminator, but the inventors are predicting saleable products within 18 months, probably powering (in the first instance) modern prosthetic limbs.Soldiers may also benefit from wearing the knee brace to power the multitude of devices they now carry ,such as night vision goggles and GPS."They treat batteries like they treat food and water - they are so essential to what they do," he said.Link to BBC articleLink to BBC VideoLink to Science Magazine articleThis whole idea seems like a "Good Thing" to me - even without the computer-control, I don't see why a pedestrian or jogger couldn't wear a pair of generators similar to those in wind-up torches, charging phone and PDA as you stroll around doing the shopping or jogging across the park. Get them with a Nike or Motorola logo, and we'd see hundreds of people wearing batman-style utility belts, stacked with all the gadgets the modern human "needs". It could really help wearable computing take off as well.

Posted by Kiteman 10 years ago


Interactive lights with sensors and such

I am currently working of my BFA in sculpture and I have a couple of gallery shows coming up and it would seem that my ideas are bigger than my knowledge base (which is okay by me, but sometimes frustrating). My current work revolves around posthumanism and I am working to blur the lines between human and machine, working with circuitry, xrays, and prosthetics. I have one set of work that I am currently a bit stumped with. I have three copper PCB boards that I am going to etch into circuits, but the lines of the circuits will resemble human faces. Each board has a character: the introvert, the extrovert, and the antagonist. The introvert will be silent, but I want the lights that glow behind it to flicker faster, or get brighter when the viewer nears. Essentially, he is quiet, but has a LED driven anxiety attack when people approach. I did this with a dark sensitive photosensor thinking that the viewers shadows would activate the light. While it worked in my living room, I realized that the gallery lighting would not lend itself to this method. So my next thought was a theremin that had light output instead of sound output. Possible? The next two will make sound and light. The extrovert needs to seek attention. I was hoping to figure out something that would talk back when something is making noise around it. So it would need to pick up the vibrations of someone talking about my work, or possibly even their footsteps, and then begin to "talk back" (lighting up and making noise). Intstead of sensing vibrations I was thinking that proximity might be easier so maybe an IR sensor. (?) The last one hate the second one. I was thinking I might be able to do something like this with a kit I have that allows me to plug one circuit into another, , where I would have it sense the light or sound coming from the extrovert and in turn verbally assault him. However,it is not a definite go, still lots of kinks so I am up for any solutions. I hope this is somewhat coherent to you. If you could give me any leads on where to start, or any places to get good information/products, that would be immensely appreciated. Thanks for your time!

Posted by idaholaura 9 years ago


Ship of Theseus - Philosophy of Identity

This past saturday there was a show on TV about the advancements in the field of prosthetics and human augmentation. I only watched less than half of it - but the timing was interesting. I came across an article about the Ship of Theseus (from Greek Legend) and have been reading quite a bit about "identity" and similar topics. This is philosophy - so there's really no right answer, but I have found it very interesting to think about and thought I'd share and see what others think.The gist of the story: Say we were to preserve Theseus' ship. As parts deteriorated and rotted away, we replace them with new (better/stronger) parts. Eventually, we replace each part with a new one. The question now is - Is it still the same ship? I'm willing to bet most of you will say yes.Now lets say that instead of replacing the ships components with new ones - we take all of the parts from the warehouse (where the parts are being stored) and reconstruct the ship from these new/better parts. Which ship has the "identity" of Theseus' ship? This is an interesting question because I'm again willing to bet that the "first" ship mentioned is your answer. But why? The parts would have gone to the "first" ship if not into the "second" ship. Why should this be different?Third Case:We take Theseus' ship and we tear it completely down in dry dock. In its place, we reconstruct using new parts. Is it still Theseus' ship?Now lets look at a digital device - my laptop for instance. Let us say that I have an "identical" machine (spec wise) and I cut and paste each file from this hard disk to the "new" machine. Does this "new" machine take the "identity" of the "old?" Can we say this "new" laptop (ship) is in fact Theseus' laptop? Talking with my colleagues - their answer (unanimously) was no - it is not the same.So here is where I get to the human side of things... Biological process have our bodies continuously replicating cells. In about a year, roughly 90% of the cells in your body will die. But no worries - they are continuously replaced with new ones. So, does that mean we are a different person compared to 12 months ago (I've read this question from several sources)? How about amputees? Today, prosthetic limbs can allow them to do what many of us choose not to do - run marathons. Are they any less of what they were before? <-- I know that sounds "wrong" - put put "political correctness" aside (but by no means am I putting down the situation of an amputee).Again, I'm willing to bet many will say yes - we're the same person. One argument is that our memories make our "identity." Fair enough. Now lets entertain the future. We now have the technology to save your memories digitally. We can digitize the human brain preserving its intelligence and thinking ability. Just entertain this idea for a few minutes. So if my brain (and its memories) are now digital and I copy it to another vessel. Is it still me? Do "I" still have the same identity? I'd like to think yes, but what was your answer about copying a laptop's memory (was it no - they are not the same)? Why should my digitized memories be any different than that of a laptop's digitized memory?At this point, my colleagues were floored. They figured out where I was going a few sentences before I said it. That's what makes the topic so interesting (in my opinion).If anyone has ever heard of HAL-5 - you already know what a feat it is. HAL-5 (yes, that's a play off of a space odyssey) is a human exoskeleton designed to assist those whom otherwise would be unable to walk for long periods of time. The user can lift heavy weights (80kg - say a dishwasher) among other helpful tasks. How does it know to move? Sensors on the skin detect electrical impulses in the brain that tell the muscle to react. Those signals are processed and turned into mechanical motion. All of this happens before the muscles have time to move. That is, the machine is moving before you even do.So if we replace our bodies and even our nervous system with mechanical devices - what makes us the same person? AND, are we the same person if we can simply copy ourselves to a new body?So last point - and it's not even my own. One of my colleagues brought this to the table today (literally at the lunch table) :P We were talking about the advancements and the potential/reality of human augmentation. Then he says something that makes complete sense to me. He said that we are at the point where our brain is evolving at a rate faster than our human bodies are. Just give yourself a minute to contemplate and wrap your head around the potential of that statement. To a degree - we have already done this (just not internally). Why else would we fly in a plane or drive a car? Well, I for one sure can't fly or run at 70+mph.1. I apologize for the length.2. I'm curious of your thoughts -- if you have another aspect of this, please do post.3. Remember there is no "correct" answer, this is just philosophy.4. There will always be more question than answers on this subject (at least I think so).HAL-5: http://www.engadget.com/2006/10/29/hal-5-robotic-suit-ready-for-mass-production/HAL-5 (mountain climb): http://www.engadget.com/2006/08/08/hal-robot-suit-almost-summits-with-quadriplegic-man-in-tow/

Posted by trebuchet03 11 years ago


Open-source Hardware License - creative commons-like license for stuff

Here on Instructables we offer authors the ability to wrap their Instructable with a variety of licenses, most notably the Creative Common Licenses (check here for your default license). These licenses only apply to the Instructable itself as a work that can be copyrighted; they do not apply to the idea presented in the Instructable. Under current law, the only way to protect the idea presented in the Instructable is through a patent. While we've toyed with the idea of a "publish this Instructable and apply for a provisional patent" button, patents are expensive and time-consuming. I have a few myself (through MIT and Squid Labs), and can say with some authority that getting a patent through the application process, defending it, and possibly licensing it is a game for corporations and is out of reach for most individuals. Roey asked me about this issue in regards to his Universal Nut Sheller (from here):"So we've figured out a way to make cheap molds anywhere in the world for the Universal Nut Sheller, https://www.instructables.com/id/EPNPAI9025EVYDUURQ/ our of concrete I'll be posting things as I go along. By the by, I was wondering if you guys had fully explored the legal issues dealing with these creative commons licences and technology. According to everything I'm aware of Creative Commons only applies to works that can be copyrighted. According to How Stuff Works: http://www.howstuffworks.com/question492.htm (admittedly not the best source) Copyrights are: Literary worksPictorial, graphic, and sculptural worksMusical worksSound recordingsDramatic worksPantomimes and choreographic worksMotion pictures and other audio-visual worksArchitectural worksand patents are: "any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof" I spoke to Jamie Love ( http://www.cptech.org/jamie/ ) about this and he told me that we need to get in contact with the folks that run Science Commons http://sciencecommons.org/ . Apparently their executive Director John Wilbanks also works for MIT. I've been trying but so far no luck. I'd be interested in hearing what you know about this area. I would love be wrong, it would be great if licencing our technology is as easy as picking a CC Licence, I'm just not sure that it is."I forwarded the question along to Eric Steuer, the Creative Director of the Creative Commons, who said:"A CC license can apply to the drawings and possibly the 3D shapes to the extent that the copyrightable elements are separable from the functional part, but there is no copyright in utilitarian designs - that stuff is better protected as a design patent (if it meets the threshold) and then he could apply a CC-like license to it...although given you only have patent rights by applying (as opposed to copyright that applies automatically) he could just not patent it and then everyone can use it..."Recently, people over at tapr.org released drafts of open-source hardware licenses. I got the following message from Jonathan Kuniholm at Duke asking for comments on the drafts: "I have spoken with each of you regarding our interest in the infrastructure for the sharing of hardware designs. An organization with its roots in amateur radio and open source software has released a draft of two open hardware licenses ( http://www.tapr.org/OHL ). I believe that the inspiration is primarily electronic hardware, but the concept addresses issues we have encountered in our work with The Open Prosthetics Project and its parent organization, the newly incorporated Shared Design Alliance. We have been interested in the ways that we might protect those who choose to share designs for public good from the possibility of having those designs patented out from under them or otherwise removed from the public domain, as well as helping them avoid the cost and time delays of patent protection for efforts from which they are not trying to profit. These draft licenses also address liability issues, which are another can of worms. I would be interested to hear thoughts from folks more knowledgeable than I about the effectiveness and potential pitfalls of such measures, given the difference between the issues surrounding physical designs and patents (for which there is currently no open license option outside of patent-related measures), and those surrounding items traditionally protected by copyright, which can currently be released under Creative Commons or GNU licenses ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ , http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html , http://www.fsf.org/ ). The TAPR folks have invited comment on their draft, and I think that this is as good an effort as I've seen so far. If you have interest or expertise in this area, please submit comments through the TAPR site, and please forward this to anyone else you know who may be interested."This is obviously an issue at the very core of open-source hardware and Instructables, so I encourage you to take a look and tell us what you think.

Posted by ewilhelm 11 years ago


Graffiti artists replicate The Matrix on Instructables.com--and win $15,000 Universal Laser Cutter!

Instructables and Universal Laser are happy to announce that the incredibly creative Instructable, How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) has won the Grand Prize in the 2008 Instructables.com and Universal Laser Cutter Contest: a 40-watt VersaLaser laser cutter valued at over $15,000!Grand Prize Winner How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) provides an extremely detailed Instructables tutorial on how to build a cheap, portable special-effects rig to create "bullet-time" animations--a technique, popularized in The Matrix movies, where the audience's point-of-view moves around the scene at normal speed while the action on screen is slowed down."We want to inspire great ideas and provide skills, tools, and shared know-how," Instructables CEO Eric Wilhelm explained. "This project represents exactly what we're trying to achieve with Instructables."The DIY Bullet Time Instructable was created and documented by the Graffiti Research Lab, an open-source urban art and communication collective supported by the Free Art & Technology Lab, a Brooklyn-based non-profit research lab creating work at the intersection of popular culture and the public domain."This will be the cornerstone of our new lab space," said GRL member fi5e. "A whole crew of creative people are really excited to put this thing to use! Thanks for helping us bring the VersaLaser to Brooklyn."The winner was chosen by votes from Instructables users and our panel of expert judges, who reviewed the 14 finalists drawn from a pool of over 600 entries. Congratulations to fi5e and everyone at the GRL - we know you'll really put the VersaLaser to work, and can't wait to see what great things you make! First Prize(in alphabetical order) Autonomous Foosball Table Blu-Ray Laser Phaser! Build a Greenland Kayak Build a Wind Harp! Build yourself a portable home - a mongolian yurt Extreme Business Cards Giant Fresnel Lens Deathray How I built a carbon bike frame at home (and a bamboo frame too) How to Make a TRON Style Lamp: The MADYLIGHT How to build a sit down driving arcade cabinet Laser cutter, start slicing stuff for under 50 dollars Laser Image Projector The Spiral Data Tato -- A Curiously Complex Origami CD Case Second Prize The authors of these Instructables win a robot t-shirt and a laser-etched plaque. Listed in alphabetical order. 30 minute USB microscope The Ambience Enhancer Autonomous, Wirelessly Controlled Hovercraft Conductive Glue And Conductive Thread: Make an LED Display and Fabric Circuit That Rolls Up. Cool Wave Ring Dollar Store Parabolic Mic Handcut inlay A Home Power Plant - Wind Power Generator Revised How to Make a Color-Changing Lighted Faux Fur Scarf How to make a pair of Angel Wings How to Make an OAWR (Obstacle Avoiding Walking Robot) Make DIY Vanilla Extract "Quicksilver" Retro-Future Scooter from appliances and scrap metal Solid Wood Digital Clock The Stirling Engine, absorb energy from candles, coffee, and more! Squishy Breast Stress Relief Toy TiggerBot II Robot Tube Amp Rebuild (and Mod) U-Disp - The Digg (tm) display (Open Source)Wooden Gear Clock Expert JudgesTo help us judge, we assembled an amazing team of expert designers, engineers, hackers, journalists, scientists, technologists, and other really smart people. They spent hours examining each of the finalists Instructables and helping us make a decision. We'd like to send a huge "Thank You" to each of our incredible judges. We couldn't have done it without you.Violet Blue (author, blogger, podcaster, columnist, and SRL vet)Gareth Branwyn (Contributing Editor, MAKE Magazine)Zoz Brooks (Host, of the upcoming TV Show Prototype This)Joe Brown (Editor, Wired Magazine)Colin Bulthaup (CTO of Potenco, co-founder Squid Labs) David Calkins (Co-founder of RoboGames) Julia Cosgrove (Deputy Editor, ReadyMade Magazine)Chris Csikszentmihalyi (Professor at the MIT Media Lab, Computing Culture Group)Simone Davalos (Co-founder of RoboGames) Lenore Edman (Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories)Dan Goldwater (Founder of monkeylectric, co-founder Squid Labs)Saul Griffith (President of Makani Power, co-founder Squid Labs, MacArthur Fellow)Duncan Haberly (Instructables)Matthew Hancher (NASA Researcher in the Intelligent Systems Division)Brian Lam (Editor, Gizmodo)Ed Lewis (Instructables)Jeffrey McGrew (Designer, Because We Can)Chuck Messer (Tackle Design, The Open Prosthetics Project, host of Discovery's Smash Lab)Megan Miller (Editor, PopSci)Jim Newton (Founder of TechShop)Quinn Norton (Journalist)Windell Oskay (Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories)David Pescovitz (BoingBoing, Institute for the Future, MAKE Magazine)Cloude Porteus (Instructables)Randy Sarafan (Instructables, Eyebeam Resident)Peter Semmelhack (Founder of Buglabs)Tyghe Trimble (News Editor, Discover Magazine)Noah Weinstein (Instructables)Eric Wilhelm (CEO of Instructables, co-founder Squid Labs)Dan Woods (Associate Publisher, MAKE Magazine) For the full information on how the winners were chosen, click here.

Posted by ewilhelm 10 years ago