what are the role of the scientists when mining zinc.

Im doing a assignment and i cant find anywhere what the roles of the scientists are. Can you help me?

Posted by Claws47 5 years ago


Dance of the Scientists

So you think you can defend your research in front of a panel of experts? How about if you had to do it... with interpretive dance.No, this is not a joke. This is the first annual Dance Your Ph.D. Contest. Read this description and hit the link for videos of the dances....the diversity of the dancers was nothing compared with the diversity of their output. The graduate student category is a case in point. The first dance, Gruetzbauch's 30-second galactic tango, focused on one phenomenon: the capture of a galaxy by a larger one. Schraffl gave us raw data—a small scene from Il pittore parigino by Domenico Cimarosa—without analysis or metaphor. Sven Ramelow did a bit of both. His quantum physics Ph.D. title allowed him to make a play on words: The acronym SPUC is a homophone of a German word for ghost, and hence the scary sheet dance. Meanwhile, he used a laser light attached to his head to illustrate the strangely behaving photons he studies. (Very clever.) But then came Brian Stewart.No one was surprised when he scooped the prize. For one thing, Stewart wore nothing but a shimmering, translucent loin cloth. (That's worth a few bonus points in my book.) But the judges told me afterward that his dance stood out because it accomplished two things at once. Most importantly, "he connected with the audience," said Pastorini. "That is the purpose of dance: to create emotions." A big help was his choice of music a jazz interpretation of African Pygmy tribal music by Herbie Hancock which created an atmosphere of funky ancientness. Dance Your Ph.D. Contestvia Neatorama

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Scientists Snack on Giant Squid

Recently scientists in middle-earth have admitted to snacking on a colossal squid being stored at their lab, while working on defrosting another giant squid. Mark Fenwick says that "It was almost like a tua tua, you know a cockle. It was very nice. It left a real taste in your mouth and stayed for quite a while,"(They say that they were checking for ammonia, but I suspect they just love the taste of cockle.)Remind me never to be a giant squid.Link

Posted by Tetranitrate 10 years ago


The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Cardboard (expired)

Have a really good Instructable about cardboard? Want to win a spot in "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Cardboard" Collection? You can submit your entry by commenting below and providing a link to your Instructable. The Mad Scientists will judge this contest and the winners will be announced shortly and will be included in the "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Cardboard" Collection. All submitted Instructables must be cardboard themed. Users are limited to one Instructable per contest. They can be both new Instructables and existing ones. Good luck!

Posted by The Mad Scientists 3 years ago


Egg Bot is here!

Apparently... Actually, this is pretty cool - it's a plotter that can draw on spherical or egg-shaped objects, from the size of a ping-pong ball to the size of a grapefruit. More details here.

Posted by Kiteman 7 years ago


Instructables on New Scientist TV

Instructables "artist in residence" Mikeasaurus has had his magnetic silly putty featured on New Scientist TV. Kudos, Mike!

Posted by Kiteman 6 years ago


The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Candy (WE NEED ENTRIES!!!)

Have a really good Instructable about candy? Want to win a spot in "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Candy" Collection? You can submit your entry by commenting below and providing a link to your Instructable. The Mad Scientists will judge this contest and the winners will be announced shortly and will be included in the "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Candy" Collection. All submitted Instructables must be candy themed. Users are limited to one Instructable per contest. They can be both new Instructables and existing ones. Good luck!

Posted by The Mad Scientists 3 years ago


An Instructable in New Scientist!

Instructables member XenonJohn has had his Self-Balancing Skateboard featured on New Scientist TV, using video taken at the UK Maker Faire. I had the pleasure of meeting John at the Faire, and I can safely say that this world needs more like him. Kudos, John.

Posted by Kiteman 7 years ago


US Army Hosts Mad Scientist Conference

The US Army recently held a mad scientist conference. I couldn't make this up if I tried. I wasn't invited, so I will share my predictions here. I predict that in the future, warfare will involve holiday specific pneumatic cannons and victory will be determined based on the amount of holiday spirit and cheer you can forcefully spread to your adversary. Seriously, were any of you invited to this?

Posted by randofo 9 years ago


The Sawed-Off Flash Drive

Evil Mad Scientist shows off the power of geek camouflage with their Sawed-Off Flash Drive that looks like a cut USB cable. Nice one! Link

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Hungry Scientist Contest Judging Deadline?

Maybe I've been hallucinating, but wasn't the "Judging Ends" deadline the tenth? I swear it was an hour ago... Then again, I did think I saw two yip-yips in the sidebar. Yes, I've read the rules: "6. Instructables reserves the right to modify, cancel, postpone or end the contest at any time as necessary..." I'm just curious to see how everyone (myself included) came out.

Posted by ERNesbitt 9 years ago


Fractal Snowflake Cupcakes

Evil Mad Scientist goes to the kitchen and again merges math with food. Their new sugary fractal creations are made with either fondant or marzipan. Check out their site for the full details on how to make one of these on your own. Fractal Snowflake Cupcakes

Posted by fungus amungus 9 years ago


Peggy: Like Lite-Brite with LEDs

Evil Mad Scientist has been really putting out the LED projects lately. They were selling a Mooninite kit, then they had pink LEDs (yum), and now they have info on how to make Peggy, an LED display where you simply plug them in and watch them glow. This 25 x 25 grid allows you to worry about what image you want to glow instead of how they're going to be wired up. Evil Mad Scientist page

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Scientists say: Hit Them Hard!

It had to happen.Scientists from the University of Ottowa have modelled the effects of a classical zombie plague, as part of a model in epidemiology.They looked at what would happen if uninfected humans attempted to cure or quarantine zombies, and the effects of retaliation:We show that only quick, aggressive attacks can stave off the doomsday scenario: the collapse of society as zombies overtake us all.It looks like we might have a need for all those zombie Instructables after all!PDF of the paper, via BBC story.

Posted by Kiteman 9 years ago


Time Travel Contest (with actual prizes!)

Fancy winning a few goodies?From the New Scientist magazine:Our theme this year is time travel. When the Large Hadron Collider at CERN was about to go into operation, some physicists speculated that it might attract visitors from the future (New Scientist, 9 February, p 32, and Feedback, 5 April ). For our competition, we ask you to imagine three such visitors arriving, each bringing glad tidings and bearing a gift from the future. What would the gifts be?Ten lucky winners will each receive a copy of Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration of the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation and Time Travel by Michio Kaku. They will also receive a selection of New Scientist goodies - including books from the Last Word series and a pen-drive.You may enter the competition online. You can also enter by email - with "Competition" in the subject field, please - or by fax or post.The competition closes on Monday 1 December {a significant date} and no entries will be accepted after that date. The results will be published in the 20/27 December issue of New Scientist. The editor's decision is final. Happy imaginings!

Posted by Kiteman 9 years ago


Ask a Scientist Special Event: Phat Tuesday Physics Circus

Come join ringmaster Zeke Kossover and his crew of sensational sideshow scientists as they (and YOU) perform dazzling demonstrations that illustrate physical principles! Watch, and listen, as sound shatters a wine glass! Ride a hovercraft! Turn on an electric pickle! Try to look at invisible glass! Witness the stopping of time! (Ok, not time exactly, but the hands of a watch.) Zeke and his crew will astound, amaze and explain, every step of the way. Can you think of a more appropriate way to celebrate Mardi Gras, than sledgehammering a bed of nails into the chest of a physics teacher from New Orleans? I sure can't!RINGMASTER: Zeke Kossover, physics teacher at Jewish Community High School of the Bay.THE CREW: Tucker Hiatt, physics teacher at The Branson School and director of Wonderfest; Leif Steinhour, Constructor, One Off Shoppe.WHEN: Tuesday, February 5th, 7:00 pm WHERE: Axis Cafe, 1201 8th Street (btw. 16th & Irwin) Ask a Scientist recommends that you come early to make sure that you get a good view.http://askascientistSF.com

Posted by noahw 10 years ago


Edible Googly Eyes from Evil Mad Scientist

Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories has a great project showing how to make One Hundred Percent EDIBLE Googly Eyes! Googly eyes definitely make anything better by allowing you to heavily personify it. I fondly remember putting a pair on the dishwasher, and suddenly our whole lexicon changed from "don't overload the dishwasher" to "be nice to dishwasher, it's had a hard day."I'm looking forward to making these and putting them on a piece of roast bison or a big salmon fillet! "Please, please don't eat me!"

Posted by ewilhelm 10 years ago


Calling British Amateur Scientists!

From the BBC: Snail "GPS", Facebook psychology and crowd dynamics at music gigs: these were just some of the ideas submitted during last year's search for "citizen science" projects. Now, Radio 4 is launching its search for the next BBC Amateur Scientist of the year. A panel of judges, chaired by Nobel Prize-winning geneticist Sir Paul Nurse, will select four finalists. The shortlisted entrants will then have their ideas turned into real experiments, with the help of a professional scientist. Last year, 70-year-old gardener Ruth Brooks won the award for her research into the homing distance of garden snails. She found that Helix aspersa, the common garden snail, can find its way home from up to 30m away. But for gardeners to be sure that their snails will not come back, they should be moved over 100m. Do you have a cool idea that could be turned into a proper piece of scientific research? The judges for So You Want to Be a Scientist? will be talking about what they'll be looking for in this year experiments on Material World, Thursday 29th September at 4.30pm, Radio 4. Entry is open to anyone over 16, who is a resident in the UK and applications can be submitted online until 31 October.    

Posted by Kiteman 6 years ago


$13 Arduino Boards now at Evil Mad Scientist Labs

Evil Mad Scientist has just released Diavolino, a low cost option for those who like to do arduino development, take a look:   "Diavolino ("little devil") is a low-cost, easy to build Arduino-compatible development board. Diavolino has the form factor of an Arduino Duemilanove or Arduino Pro, but with nicely rounded corners and a striking appearance. It's a low-profile through-hole version, with a simplified design. It's based on a ATmega328P microcontroller, and comes pre-flashed with the Arduino bootloader. Open source design, with bare basics hardware."   You can buy them here

Posted by frenzy 8 years ago


Dry-Ice Martini and Electric Cake - Hungry Scientist and Instructables in the NYT

The Hungry Scientist Handbook, Turkey tek, and Instructables were the topic of Dry-Ice Martini and Electric Cake in the New York Times:WHEN does a recipe become a science project?Is it when the compulsion to create an edible electrical circuit keeps a cook up all night, wrapping Twizzler string licorice in pure silver?Is it when a baker decides to bake 20 equilateral-triangle-shaped pecan pies for Thanksgiving, then attach them together with magnets to form an 80-serving icosahedron? (The recipe begins with 30 cups of flour and 2 large sheets of 24-gauge steel.) More news and press about Instructables here.

Posted by ewilhelm 9 years ago


CONVERT IPOD TO RECEIVE TV SIGNAL

HI THERE HIDDEN SCIENTIST IN ALL OF US TO EXPLORE HIS CAPACITIES THE FORUM LIKE INSTRUCTABLES TO ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE

Posted by 646433 9 years ago


New Scientist recreates a robot made by the ancient Greeks

A friend forwarded this along:Ok, this was on slashdot, and it may be a little old, but it was the coolest thing I've seen today.If you can't watch the 2 minute video, the robot works by having a falling weight turn an axel. However, the real ingenuity of 60 AD shines from pegs that are put in the axel that the rope can be wrapped around in order to make the axel turn different directions at pre-programmed intervals.

Posted by ewilhelm 11 years ago


Ideas For Instructables Needed

Ideas for making Instructables anyone? Just post your ideas below and we may make them into an Insructable!

Posted by The Mad Scientists 3 years ago


CandyFab 6000 prints in 3D with sugar

The folks at Evil Mad Scientist have gone back to printing with sugar with their CandyFab 6000. This version of the 3D printer that makes solid objects out of sugar now fits on a desktop. It's also designed so that you can easily get all the parts to build it from scratch without having to search for old HP pen plotters.Hit the link for more info. CandyFab 6000 via Make blog

Posted by fungus amungus 9 years ago


Dinosaur Discovery

Exciting news from Utah: well-preserved dinosaur fossils, petrified trees, and other remnants of the time of the dinosaurs were found. This could help scientists get a better grasp of the plant life during the Jurassic era. Not that there's anything more to know--Jurassic Park and Dinotopia taught us everything there is to know about dinosaurs.LinkPlus, take a look at the video at the bottom of the page about dinosaur excrement. The expert's living room is something to be, well, admired.

Posted by joshf 10 years ago


Solar-driven Stirling engines for electricity generation

The "Picture of the Day" in today's New Scientist shows a solar power generation test using Stirling engines as the generators.

Posted by kelseymh 9 years ago


What would you ask Terry Pratchett?

Next week, (New Scientist are) going to interview Terry Pratchett, author of the enormously successful Discworld series of books - or rather, you are. Tell us what questions you'd like to put to him in the comments below. We'll run the interview in a forthcoming issue of New Scientist.Remember, the more original your question is, the more likely it is we'll pick it - which means "Where do you get your ideas?" is out, for a start. And bear in mind we cover science and technology, not writing or publishing.Thinking caps on, then. Or should that be pointy hats?You must be able to do better than "Is it hard being so awesome?"!Link to article and comment boxNote "Next week" was written on 25th September 2009 - if you are reading this some time in 2016, you're a bit late to contribute...

Posted by Kiteman 8 years ago


PLastic to oil converter

Hello, One year later, I found that video on youtube about a japanese scientist who converted plastic back to oil : Source : http://ourworld.unu.edu/en/plastic-to-oil-fantastic/ I waited for a convenient version for home use but still the smallest system weight 50Kg (100 pounds I guess). For what I read on the subject it's a kind of catalytic pyrolysis (whatever it means for such a non scientist as myself...). As any of you have an idea on how to make this kind of system for everyday use?

Posted by hypelike 6 years ago


Bacteria excrete oil

Looky!Scientists in sunny CA have genetically altered bacteria so they eat garbage and excrete crude oil. They plan to be in commercial production by 2011. Sweet!

Posted by Lithium Rain 10 years ago


"D'oh!" or "Oh my God, we're all going to die!" ?

This article from New Scientist raises the question posted in the title. Which response is more appropriate?

Posted by kelseymh 9 years ago


Interactive LED coffee Table??? How to???

Hey All...Just giving someone an idea for an instructable, the Interactive LED coffee table designed by Evil Mad Scientist is IMO pretty damn sweet but i can by no way afford the kits or table, so I was wondering if anyone could tell me how to go about a DIY. it looks fairly simple but i'm still learning the basics of electronics.here is their websiteInteractive LED Coffee Table by Evil Mad Scientisteven something similar would be pretty sweet.Cheers Guys and GalsAndrew

Posted by TANN-MANN 10 years ago


Mad Science Tee Shirts!

Hello fellow instructablers!  I started my first ever teespring.com crowd funded run of tshirts about a week ago, and I'm SO CLOSE to hitting my goal!   I figured Mad Science (being the best science) might be of interest to the rest of the instructables community.  This is my own design, and I'm pretty proud of it.  Perhaps you'd like to share your own love of Mad Science by sporting one of these awesome shirts, or giving one as a gift to the Mad Scientist in your life! As of this posting (December 4, 2013 at 9:00 pm) there's just 3 days and 19 hours to go!  If I get just 10 people to preorder they get printed (I'm at 9 now), and if I get more than that then I make a little scratch to fund future projects. http://teespring.com/bestscience

Posted by depotdevoid 4 years ago


Scientists HELP!!! Ideas/Instructables for installation art celebrating chemistry, new elements, need models of atoms

I am heading a group of teens making ART to be installed in a park in Livermore, CA where the Lawerence Livermore National Lab has commissioned us to celebrate the discovery of the 116th element "Livermorium" - problem is, we artists need help VISUALIZING and making the esoteric idea of atoms into VISUALS that the lay person could enjoy and understand. We have a corner park. We need to make INTERACTIVE science displays that are hardy to the weather and to human touch. -- How to show (the latest ideas) of an atomic model for Livermorium?? -- How to explain/show what that element is for? -- How to display the dynamics of molecules, atoms, electrons, protons, etc. --what machines does a scientist use to discover new elements? Please reply with links to images, explain simply about the structure of atoms/molecules, IDEAS?

Posted by stinastar 6 years ago


New Scientist

I'm sure people are aware but http://www.newscientist.com/In this weeks issue:Someone in China has spent some time analysing the US power grid, and figured out that it could be collapsed by taking-out a lightly-loaded sub-network. The US department of homeland security is apparently looking into this. However, Prof Ian Fells (a jolly chap with a beard) of Newcastle University UK says "they only need a bunch of guys with Semtex to blow up the gridlines near a power station"The Mythbusters are interviewed, but even they don't know why thermite on ice explodes, do you?And Richard Dawkins has a new book out, from the review:"Implying that your audience is stupid does not qualify as a great new angle. Yet this is precisely what Dawkins does"."It's really kind of comical. If "spot the condecensions" is a new drinking game, then bottoms up! There's one in just about every chapter"LThere's much more, but I mainly wanted to post the Mythbusters link, and the Dawkins review.(There is an article on Velociraptors)

Posted by lemonie 8 years ago


Reducing cow burping 'is key to tackling climate change'

Argentine scientists are taking a novel approach to studying global warming - strapping plastic tanks to the backs of cows to collect their burps .source

Posted by ivan.veretelnyk 10 years ago


Squids in danger

Squids and other cephalopods have been found with high levels of "chemical contaminants" in their bodies. Since many ocean dwellers eat squid and octopi, scientists are worried that the entire food web is being comtaninated.Full story at Cnn.com

Posted by Lithium Rain 10 years ago


3 D Printing of BODY PARTS !!!!!

Scientists Use 3D Printer to Create First “Printed” Human Vein   Brit Liggett Scientists Use 3D Printer to Create First “Printed” Human Vein by Brit Liggett, 03/22/10 filed under: Design for Health   3D Printing technology has recently leapt into a new realm — we’ve seen printers that can create entire buildings out of stone, delicious meals out of simple ingredients, and now — perhaps weirdest and coolest of them all — a printer that can build body parts from cells!   Body Part Printer LINK ANOTHER LINK to another more familiar site.... Picture

Posted by Goodhart 7 years ago


Bristlebot snail

Evil Mad Scientist, already known to Instructables from their fantastic LED coffee table kit, have created this amazing little thing:Velvet Bristlebot Racing SnailI just love it. When I make mine I'll post a pic.

Posted by rachel 10 years ago


Experimental drug reverses Alzheimer's

From BBC News US scientists say they have successfully reversed the effects of Alzheimer's with experimental drugs.Note that it says reverse, so people can get their memories back! Thoughts?

Posted by Keith-Kid 9 years ago


Small animals levitated by sound

If anyone is looking for an advanced cool project, here it is: Acoustic Levitation. Scientists at Northwestern Polytechnical University in Xian have used sound waves to levitate small creatures while they are still alive, without causing them any apparent harm.

Posted by ewilhelm 11 years ago


Burning Saltwater?

I found this article in class today, and thought it was pretty interesting. a scientist discovered that by exposing saltwater to radio waves, it weakens the bonds in the water, and the hydrogen can be burnt.http://www.engadget.com/2007/09/11/can-saltwater-be-burned-as-fuel/

Posted by its a lion 10 years ago


Ask a Scientist [topic: ancient science]

Topic: The 2000-Year-Old Computer (and Other Achievements of Ancient Science)We learn in school that the science of our ancestors included such endearing bunk as flat planets, geocentric solar systems, and the balancing of the body's four humors. (Even the pre-internet decades of my youth now seem to me like a dark, distant era of ignorance that I can't believe we all survived.) Did our ancient predecessors get anything right? Of course they did. Tonight, science historian Richard Carrier will discuss the nature and limitations of ancient science.While crucial contributions have come from many different cultures throughout history, Richard will talk about a handful of Graeco-Roman scientific and technological advances that might surprise you. Here's a teaser: we'll learn about the Antikythera mechanism, the oldest known computer discovered in a 2000-year-old shipwreck near Crete (pictured below). Cool.ABOUT THE SERIES: Ask a Scientist is an informative, entertaining, casual science lecture series, held at a San Francisco cafe. Each event features a speaker on a current topic, a short presentation, and the opportunity to ask all those burning questions that have been keeping you up at night. No tests, grades, or pressure, just food, drinks, socializing, and conversation about the universe's most fascinating mysteries. February 26, 200807:00 PM - 09:00 PMCost: FreeLocation: MapAxis Cafe1201 8th Street (btw. 16th & Irwin)San Francisco, CA 94107Additional Info:http://www.askascientistsf.com/

Posted by noahw 10 years ago


Carl Zimmer's Science Tattoo Emporium

Underneath their sober lab coats and flannel shirts, scientists hide images of their scientific passions.Writer Carl Zimmer wondered aloud whether many scientists have tattoos that reflect their science or other geeky interests, and the response was an emphatic yes. He's posting the photos and stories of scientific ink up at the Science Tattoo Emporium. Today's is a gorgeous backpiece of the tree of life, belonging to a grad student in zoology at the University of Melbourne.Of course, now I'm curious -- do any of you makers, builders, tinkerers, and crafters have geeky tattoos? If not, what would your tattoo be? Carl Zimmer writes a fascinating science blog called The Loom along with other science journalism.

Posted by reno_dakota 10 years ago


Steampunk Gets Real

As reported on New Scientist today, the British steam-powered vehicle Inspiration broke the previous land-speed record for steam power, set back in 1906. The fastest of the two runs was 151 mph, set on a dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base.

Posted by kelseymh 8 years ago


World's Largest Stop-Motion Animation.

From the people that brought you the world's smallest stop-motion animation, comes the world's largest - shot on a beach, some scenes covered 1000m2. New Scientist TV's video format won't embed here, so you'll have to follow this link.

Posted by Kiteman 7 years ago


Group : Collection of Instructables for class-room and teaching purposes ...

Hi !I created a group that seems not to have been ever created here yet."Class-Room" group.The main purpose of this group is to make a collection of every instructables that may be useful for school teaching, and that may be reproduced by pupils or students as science-fair or class-room projects ...Please, add your Instructables if they fit this description._Biology :"Be a Scientist : map your skin"Chemistry :"Carbonating""Kitchen laboratory II : The CO2 trap""Make crystal clear ice !""Make Rheopectic slime in less than 15 minutes !""Shelling a raw egg !""Sodium Acetate"Investigations :"Amazing Kite For Under $5""How to make Playdough (Play-doh)""Oobleck""Pop-Up 3D words and messages !""The Huffin' Hoopster""The Improved CD Hovercraft."Physics : Electricity & Electrostatics :"Build an Electrostatics Motor""Jacob's Ladder Sculpture from found materials""Kelvin's Thunderstorm : Create lightning from water""Paper Resistor"Physics : Instruments & Measures :"Be a Scientist : Make your own force-meter.""Be a Scientist : Make your own thermometer"Physics : Magnetism :"A simple mechanical resonance demonstrator""Diamagnetic Levitation Experiment"Physics : Optics :"Naff Movie into _DVD-Spectra_""Optical Water-Prism"Physics : Sound :"How to measure the speed of sound ...""Mechanica Wave Driver for Chladni Plate"

Posted by chooseausername 10 years ago


Making a bug collectors helm.

Does anyone know of some instructions to make a leather type cap with magnification glass or strange levers protruding out of it? I'd like to make something "weird-scientist"-like for my entomologist friend, Thanks! edited to spell "bug guy" correctly

Posted by Oakherder 10 years ago


Do It Yourself Genetic Engineering

From New ScientistKATHERINE AULL's laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, lacks a few mod cons. "Down here I have a thermocycler I bought on eBay for 59 bucks," she says, pulling out a large, box-shaped device she uses to copy short strands of DNA. "The rest is just home brew," she adds, pointing to a centrifuge made out of a power drill and plastic food container, and a styrofoam incubator warmed with a heating pad normally used in terrariums.In fact, Aull's lab is a closet less than 1 square metre in size in the shared apartment she lives in. Yet amid the piles of clothes she recently concocted vials of an entirely new genetically modified organism....Read the whole article in New Scientist

Posted by kelseymh 9 years ago


Opinions please: EMS "Meggy Jr"

OK, I keep saying I ought to learn to solder properly. I ought to learn to programme chips. I ought...Well, you get the idea.So, I was browsing Evil Mad Scientist, and I came across Meggy Jr. It's a kit, you solder it, you can programme it. Ticks all the boxes, no?But, all I have to go on are EMS' own comments - looking for reviews, all I find are reports of its existence, plus silly comments from people who haven't used it. I haven't found any video of it being played, and I can't tell if it makes any sounds.Has anybody used it? Is it any good? Is it worth splashing out $130+? (This isn't an immediate purchase - probably in the New Year.)

Posted by Kiteman 9 years ago


Carbon emissions still increasing despite recession

With the whole economic kerfuffle going on you would've thought that there would be less carbon going up into the air. New studies show that emissions continue to ride, however. The data is collected and analyzed by scientists from the Norwegian Polar Institute and Stockholm University. Researchers found that during the first two weeks of March, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rose to 393.71 parts per million (ppm), up from 393.17 ppm during the same period last year. John Stroem, a scientist with the Norwegian Polar Institute, told Reuters that looking back at data gathered since the 1980s, the increase in carbon concentration levels seems to be accelerating. Carbon Emissions at All-Time High Despite Economic Slowdown

Posted by fungus amungus 8 years ago