The "Info" block in answers seems to be scrambled

The "Info" block in answers seems to be scrambled.  I'm using firefox 3.6.8.  Refresh doesn't help.

Posted by Re-design 8 years ago


Calling All Programmers (Yes, ALL)

Every now and then in typing class, our teacher will give us a handful of letters, and we're given about 5 minutes to come up with as many words as we can from these letters. So today I thought... what if there was a program where you could input a string of letters, and it would spit out as many words as possible that can be made out of those letters. A quick Google search was less than fruitful. So, to the more techier of my fellow Iblians, how would you go about writing a program that could do this? I'm thinking something where you input a string of letters, and then it scans, say, an online dictionary, to find as many words as possible from the inputted letters. Sound doable?

Posted by Labot2001 9 years ago


Bugs on Posting A Comment

This past few days, I observed that the comments get scrambled. Comments fall under the wrong tree-pattern, specially when you click on the feature comment. Please help, miss communication occurs when comments get scrambled. Thank you!

Posted by ASCAS 5 years ago


Last-minute scramble!

OK, mea culpa, I started it , and others have jumped on the bandwagon.Add your own link if you're after a few last-minute views for your LED contest entries.(Another shameless link)(Actually, you can tell I'm usually behind the camera, can't you? )

Posted by Kiteman 10 years ago


Update on Team Instructables in the Red Bull Creation Contest

Team Instructables participated in the Red Bull Creation Contest this past weekend: a harrowing 72 hours of intense building. We had an amazing and exhausting time, and are still recovering from lost sleep and too many energy drinks. See the original post about the build here. The build is over, but the contest is not! Voting starts July 25th. The contest hosts are collecting some media from every team, which will go on their website. But we thought you deserved the first look at what we made: Psycho Scooter Scramble the blind-driving electric wheelchair game Psycho Scooter Scramble is a game for four: two riders and two pilots. The trusting rider is strapped into an electric wheelchair, placing their life in the hands of a blindfolded pilot. The pilot controls the rider's careening wheelchair from the sidelines based on shouted headset commands from the rider. The basic mechanic is simple: players must drive across the court to get a ball from a stand, then drive back across to put the ball in a hoop. This action is repeated until all four balls have been scored or the timer runs out. However, since there is an inevitable disconnect between the pilots’ steering and their teammates’ intentions, wheelchairs zigzag across the court at high speeds, colliding with each other, ball stands, the scoreboard, and everything else, making full use of the custom steel bumpers and creating hilarious mayhem for the benefit of onlookers and players alike. It's kind of like this: (wonderful descriptive graphic by fjordcarver) I've uploaded our best gameplay (and a few build) photographs to this post. Here is a video of how it works:   More videos can be found on Instructables TV. Big thanks from the Instructables Build Team! Thanks also to our last-minute build helpers: Eric, Jessy, Matt, and Jake. We couldn't have done it without you. We really can't thank you enough for supporting us in this contest and in our build. Particularly on the last day, is our state of sleep deprivation and occasional desperation, we needed the emotional support of everybody in our Instructables community. (Special shout-out to fjordcarver for exceptional support over the LiveStream.) Final thought: This game is awesome. Win or lose, we're glad we did it, because there is truly no game in the world that is quite like Psycho Scooter Scramble. Also, we learned that you can get a sweet electric wheelchair on Craigslist for under $200, and have some idea how to hack it. And that knowledge is priceless. Look for an Instructable, coming soon, on how to make Psycho Scooter Scramble yourself! Starting July 25th, this project and those of the other 11 teams can be found here. Laugh, cry, enjoy, and remember to vote! If we win, we get to show this off at World Maker Fair in New York. (And yes, if you're there, you can play too.)

Posted by SelkeyMoonbeam 6 years ago


help me to wheelchair joystick hack

I wanna circuit diagram of the connection between the 2 joysticks and ardunio....the interface circuit...any information about hacking jc2000 joystick of wheelchair will help me in may project pls....waiting for your replay https://www.instructables.com/id/Psycho-Scooter-Scramble/

Posted by dany151 6 years ago


Electro-Magnet

Ok, i'll be frank. i need to find out how to build an electro magnet with and effective ranger of about twenty or so feet i find it very interesting. and have always wanted to snatch up a small object/scramble a crowd of cellphones. former more than the latter. any help would be very appreciated. THANKS

Posted by blingity 10 years ago


Why do people not post the simplest instructables?

I was thinking to myself about the simple things in life that we all need to do at some point or another, so I searched instructables on how to make scrambled eggs, read a map, program in c(+)(++), and there was nothing posted! Does anybody even know how to do these things, so they can post them?

Posted by ongissim 11 years ago


Shell says "Peak oil in 7 years."

In a recent e-mail to Shell employees, Shell CEO Jeroen van der Veer writes:"Regardless of which route we choose, the world's current predicament limits our maneuvering room. We are experiencing a step-change in the growth rate of energy demand due to population growth and economic development, and Shell estimates that after 2015 supplies of easy-to-access oil and gas will no longer keep up with demand."2015 is seven years away and with limited resources and an expanding population we are sure to see more and more limitations on resources we take for granted. Water, cooking oil, and food are also in that list.The e-mail goes on to say that little will likely be done about this situation by any governments until the poop has really hit the fan and by then it will probably be too late. Two scenarios are laid out in the e-mail, Scramble and Blueprints. One is a mad dash towards a solution as we hit the problem head-on and the other is to make a plan now for the inevitable.Personally, I hope for the Blueprints scenario, but I feel like the Scramble is likely what we'll be doing. link

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


random led scrambler

I recently was asked a challenging question concerning a type of circuit design. My electronics knowledge is somewhat limited and was wondering if i could get some help on this project. The project is: How do you get one led to light up amongst a row of say ten or more leds by selecting from one switch from a row with the same number of switches. The system should be set up so every switch will have a randomly selected led circuit. In other words the leds are randomly scrambled for the switches. This is basically a type of led guessing game but also involves guessing witch switch will operate which led. Thanks!

Posted by eddicur 7 years ago


Doctor drills into boy's head to save his life

The regular household drill is a wonderful thing. It can be used for drilling holes in wood, scrambling eggs, and even drilling into a boy's skull to drain it of blood clots. Yikes!Dr Rob Carson performed the procedure on Nicholas Rossi, 13, after the boy fell off his bike and hit his head.The doctor had never attempted the surgery before, and had to be talked through the operation by a Melbourne neurosurgeon.The boy's father said the doctor's improvisation had saved his son's life.But Dr Carson told reporters: "It's not a personal achievement, it is just a part of the job." Link

Posted by fungus amungus 9 years ago


PIZZA THURSDAYS!

Hey Everybody! Today is the day I decide to share this gem with you. Here at Instructables HQ, we often have pizza on Thursdays. It was initiated by Randofo's deep desire to keep his office companions happy and fed, and has evolved into a reason for me to make the following artworks. Each image is mailed out to the entire office as soon as the pizza delivery person arrives. Pizza Thursdays also lives on tumblr. Made on Mad's last day as an Artist-in-Residence. SelkeyMoonBeam and AmandaGhassaei playing Psycho Scooter Scramble   I will continue to generate sweet pizza art, every Thursday that we have pizza (and maybe forever). I will keep adding the new .gifs to the comments of this blog. Stay tuned.  

Posted by audreyobscura 6 years ago


Father's Day Instructables

Oh, damn, Father's Day is almost here and what can you give the guy who claims to not want anything? Well, we have a few suggestions for you. We dug through the ol' archives to find some things that just might make your dad happy this weekend. We hope this helps as a few of us are also scrambling to figure out what to make as well.If you have any suggestions for other appropriate Father's Day Instructables, post them in the comments! Etch a Shot Glass  Concrete Lightbulb Wall Hook Jackhammer Headphones Brew Beer! Carbonated Fruit Dirty Soap Beer Helmet Free Yacht Make a Lure Fire up the BBQ! Smoked Sausage Handmade Pipe

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Here we go again, Shakin' In Our Shoes

Well, we've had round three of mother's earth trembling and shaking! http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/christchurch-earthquake-2011/5136644/Powerful-earthquakes-rock-Christchurch The magnitude 5.5 quake struck at 1pm, 10 kilometres east of Christchurch at Taylor's Mistake beach, at a depth of 11 kilometres, and sent people scrambling for cover. It was followed at 2.20pm by a more powerful magnitude 6 quake, centred 10 kilometres southeast of the city and 9km underground. At least 46 people were injured in the earthquakes today Radio New Zealand reported. At least ten people were taken to Christchurch Hospital with injuries due to falling building material after the 1pm quake.  

Posted by ll.13 7 years ago


Help on R/C plane workings

This is my first time on the site and first time with trying to build a rc anything.  My mind is so scrambled due to constant searching online and I still don't know where to start. First, I thought of building a brushless motor.  Seeing some online looks awesome.  Just some wire, rod and a magnet to a battery.  But I do not know the size of battery nor  how the size of the wire will change my project. Second, it would be fun to have my PS2 controller, control the heli or plane I choose to build. Is this possible. Third, can I use a motor from a cheap heli in a plane and have control over the speed? Lastly for now, is there a way to figure what motor I need if I was going to build a slow flyer vs a outdoor micro flyer?  I have been looking at weight mostly and don't know if I need to be that concerned. Please help if you dare to take me on as a challenge case.

Posted by Todd M 5 years ago


[Arduino] Need some help with a few lines of code.

Hi! I have put together a nasty little robot over the past few days with an arduino, ardumoto shield, HCSR04 Ping Sensor, and a  beat up RC car. Currently I have it scrambling around the floor bashing into things and want to add even more unreliable muck to its maneuvers. Here is my code so far: #define trigPin 9 #define echoPin 10 int maxrange = 200; int minrange = 50; long duration, distance; void setup() {   pinMode(trigPin, OUTPUT);   pinMode(echoPin, INPUT); } void loop() {   digitalWrite(trigPin, LOW);   delay(2);     digitalWrite(trigPin, HIGH);   delay(10);     digitalWrite(trigPin, LOW);   duration = pulseIn(echoPin, HIGH);     distance = duration/58.2;     if (distance >= minrange){   digitalWrite(12, LOW);   analogWrite(3, 255); } else {   digitalWrite(12, HIGH);   analogWrite(3, 255); } } All this does is make it go back and forth in regards to objects, but the lack of any tread on its wheels make it spin around quite a bit. I want to add in random movements of the front steering wheels, but I don't know much about coding and even less about making code choose randomly. Any help?

Posted by martzsam 3 years ago


I'm off for the night!

Kitewife has just handed me a shiny new copy of Unseen Academicals, by The Man Himself.Back in a few hours...UPDATEI'm back, and here is my favourite passage, which I can also post with spoiling anything:[He] took a sip of his beer. 'I have told this to few people, gentlemen, and I suspect never will again, but one day when I was a young boy on holiday ... I was walking along the bank of a stream when I saw a mother otter with her cubs. A very endearing sight, I am sure you will agree, and even as I watched, the mother otter divd into the water and came up with a plump salmon, which she subdued and dragged on to a half-submerged log. As she ate it, while of course it was still alive, the body split and I remember to this day the sweet pinkness of its roes as they spilled out, much to the delight of the baby otters who scrambled over themselves to feed on the delicacy. One of nature's wonders, gentlemen: mother and children dining on mother and children. And that's when I first learned about evil. It is built into the very nature of the universe. Every world spins in pain. If there is any kind of supreme being, I told myself, it is up to all of us to become his moral superior'.

Posted by Kiteman 9 years ago


Cool Neon Build Night at the Taipei Hackerspace

Hi everyone, Just checking in from Taipei Hackerspace. We have just finished out Build Night last weekend. It was 5-6 of us hacking away on electro-luminescent wire projects. Started in the afternoon, fortunately got dark by the time we had anything to try. The results are: [Hack] light into the night, and maybe even party Simple neon display, or pimped up to be light beats for music Galloping horse display Animated display, go horsie go! There are more photos on our Facebook page. It was fun, with some lessons learned: * I should have checked out the hardware we get before the event, had to scramble to find some example code for the Cool Neon Shield, how to use it * the Shield behaves a bit weird, when the driver is used in the "on" setting (as opposed to "blink"), the light "latches" - once the arduino turns it on, it won't turn off until the power is removed. Worked around this by using things in blink mode, but not idea * will have to use a wall-plug driver for the shield later, as the batteries are not powerful enough to make it look good when more than one EL wire is on (it's brighter on the pictures/video than with eyes). * people love things that light up :) Cheers! Greg

Posted by taipeihackerspace 4 years ago


Build a Catapult, Mario Wii, Make a Knife...

Sign-up for our newsletter here. Mar. 13, 2008 Mouse Mouse is missing! While we were at SXSW someone walked off with our dear little mouse mouse from our display table. If you have any information, please let us know! No kidding, only one was made and we'd like to get him back. OK, back to the regular Instructables news... Today we are launching the Pocket-Sized speed contest. Make something cool that fits into a regular pocket, then enter it to win some sweet prizes! This is the last weekend for the Toss It! paper airplane speed contest. Enter your favorite paper airplane design and win an Air Instructables Pilot's License. The winners for the Anti-Yo Worldwide Video Yoyo Contest have been announced. See the video that won the $350 yoyo! Check out these cool instructables! How to build your first robot Use this walkthrough to make an autonomous, self-exploring, "own-mind" robot in a few hours! posted by fritsl on Mar 12, 2007 How To Make Delicious Scrambled Eggs A simple and quick recipe for great tasting scrambled eggs! posted by Brennn10 on Mar 9, 2008 Industrial Picture Frame Make industrial-style metal picture frames without spending loads of cash. posted by mada on Mar 6, 2008 Super Mario Bros Inspired Wii with USB base Decorate your Wii with some old-school graphics, and give it a couple of cool add-ons in the process. posted by BeerBellyJoe on Mar 9, 2008 How To Build A Catapult Launch stuff 100 yards with your very own siege weapon. posted by T3h_Muffinator on Mar 12, 2008 How to pill a cat, the easy way. When you need to give your cat some medicine you might need to be a little creative to get her to take it. posted by sunitgir on Mar 7, 2008 Pocket-Sized Speed Contest One trick ruledthem all What do you do for your pet? How To Teach Your Dog Some Important Tricks (And Some Not So Important Ones) Learn some basics of teaching your dog a couple new tricks. posted by Gjdj3 on Mar 10, 2008 How To Make an Applique! Jazz up an old piece of clothing with a funky bit of fabric to give it a whole new life, and live in style! posted by threadbanger on Mar 6, 2008 The 10 Minute Laptop Stand A quick trip to the hardware store + a little bit of work = your own laptop stand. posted by johnbot on Mar 9, 2008 How to Build a Knife Making a knife isn't easy, but this guide will get you started on the skills you'll need to make one yourself. posted by Basta on Feb 26, 2008 AC White LED Circular Magnifier Work Lamp Use bright LEDs to replace fluorescent circular light in magnifier work lamp.Let there be light! posted by arcticpenguin on Mar 11, 2008 How to "Salt Out" Salting out is a process that can be used to dehydrate Isopropyl alcohol, i.e., separate it from water in an azeotropic solution. posted by thinkahead on Mar 3, 2008   Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric

Posted by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Can a solid state amplifier be reconstructed/reconfigured as a tube amp?

All guitarists seem to prefer the sound of a tube amp over solid state. Amp manufacturers, after committing to the solid state format, hook, line, and heat sinker, must have been appalled when guitarists began to demand availability of the old school tube amps, and scrambled to replicate the distinctive tube sound by means of additional effects and eventually modelling features. But, the big boys doggedly refused to admit the error of their ways, which, as it turns out, was a good thing as new amp manufacturers began to spring up to fill the void. Finally after sitting around their boardrooms, no doubt sipping their Coke new recipes while watching their market shares dwindle, they decided to reissue some of their most popular tube amps...at six times the initial price of course. I can't afford a new tube amp. I can't afford a used tube amp. Ebay and craigslist are rife with inexpensive, (relatively), solid state amps. My question then is, could a solid state amp be retrofitted with a tube chassis and perhaps still utilize some of the solid state attributes and parts? My instinct tells me yes. However, my knowledge of electronics and theory being nil, I really haven't the foggiest idea of what might be involved with such an undertaking. To say that a schematic is Greek to me is a gross understatement. Therefore, I appeal to the genius of the Instructable contributers to comment, or even better, start a project build. (C'mon gmoon, you know you want to!) Thanks Sycan

Posted by Sycan 9 years ago


Tracing Plastic Water Pipe Underground.

Earlier today, while removing tree stumps, on of my crew struck water. The theme song for the Beverly Hillbillies came up. "when up from the ground came a bubbling crude! ...oil, that is... " except it was water, and we went scrambling to find the water shutoff. Lawn Sprinkler systems usually have plastic pipe a few inches underground.  No metal.   :.   Can't find it with metal detector. Potential Options: AC wires can be tracked through walls by the electromagnetic flux around them. Stud sensors today also have a circuit for AC wiring. Could something like that be used?  Although city water has some minerals in it, does it have enough to conduct electricity well enough for an electric pulse sensor? If the water in the system was temporarily made salty enough for an EM signal to be traced, would it mess up the lawn once you dumped that salty h2o? Whata bout conductivity of a fertilizer mix? Medical scans- barium- mildly radioactive. mmmm.... yeah. right. Chemical sniffers- sniff out those semi-soft pipes? Like dogs sniffing out contraband in the airport... Use water flow to carry a fine wire through the pipe, then track an EM signal in that wire. sonic imaging (or at least detection- like the stud sensor) ground penetrating radar... That's all I can think of.  Every option I can think of has issues. Is there any precedent for something that works in this situation?

Posted by Toga_Dan 4 years ago


Safety of your garage door or car remote...

No time and no pics for a proper Instructable, so I just put out some word of warning ;) Around here bad people take advantage of the fact that a lot of new houses have the garage right next to the house. With these you usually also get a door so when you park your car you don't have to get out of the garage again. All controlled by the press of a button on the remote... Some fancy guys got a device working similar to the IM-ME Open Sesame hack a few years back. But unlike the original author the new guys found ways to make money by providing working "universal garage door openers" on dubious websites. Problem with the new model is that it not only fakes a remote with dip switches but also the newer models with so called "rolling code", "intellicode", "changing code" and so on. The old remotes with dip switches should actually by phased out years ago by any owner who values his stuff... But the new models are still deemed secure and next to impossible to hack - well if you trust the advertisement... How does the code hacking work? The old dip switch models allow for a maximum of just over 4000 different codes and come in just 3 or 4 frequency bands. No real problem for anyone with basic electronic and coding skills to hack these - as shown with Open Sesame. The new models all use a so called rolling code, here the remote and opener are paired through 32 bit of ID code and an encrypted part that changes every time. Both remote and opener calculate the next code once a button was pressed or a code received. To overcome reception problems the base usually calculates the next 256 codes in advance - and that is the entry point for bad boys. The illegal device scrambles the frequency detected while storing the code received by the orignal remote. As the door did not open the owner will try to press the button again. Still scrambled to opener does nothing - until the device sends out the first recorded code! Now the owner can drive in and is happy. Of course he still needs to close the garage - again all is scrambled and the code stored as before. You see where this is going.... It is even possible to set the amount of required tries to capture, so in theory a bad guy could get the next 10 or codes in advance for use once the owner is gone out... Worst thing however is that these illegal devices not only open garage doors but also cars as a lot of them use similar systems for their remotes - up to the point of starting the car with it. Took me only 2 hours with Google translate to find a website outside the usual search results that offers these "gadgets", along with WiFi and cell phone jammers, credit card copy devices and more things I don't want know about... What can you do to protect yourself? First check what type of remote your system uses - if there are DIP Switches than replace the remote system or the entire device in favour for something more secure. If you already have a rolling code model that you are far better off but sadly no longer totally safe here. A lost remote should not only be replaced but the old one removed from the system as well - you never know if you just lost it or someone took your remote ;) Alternatives exist, especially if you are not afraid of doing some open heart surgery on the electronics of a garage door opener. You can add a WiFi module and use your mobile phone to open the garage - search Google if you like the idea ;) Another very neat way is using a second transmitter that keeps the relay for activating the opener from working. This can be anything from a BT module paired with your phone or cars BT system over a keycard to numberplate recognition cams. A good system also allows for a "holiday mode" or similar. Here you can set this mode with one remote until you deactivate it with the same remote the system will not react to anything. Great if you leave the house for more than a day or two... As a last resort you can always get a big and angry dog to sleep in your garage.... What if you are renting or a bit limited with the electronics and soldering skills? Not all is lost if you can accept a second remote for added safety. These days you can get plug in converters for your mains voltage outlets that work with a remote control. Unless they use Infra Red for this they are great to disable your opener. Simply plug it in where the power cord for the opener is and then plug the cord into it as well ;) Now you can fully shut off the opener with the press of a button and only if the power outlet is switched on the opener will work. If in doubt you can use a double outlet adapter an extension cord and a night light to indicate wether or not the opener has power. Ok, and what about the door lading from the garage into the house? Well, of course keep it locked and if you are home also keep it locked. At least this way you have some extra time in case someone tries to enter through your garage while you are sleeping ;)

Posted by Downunder35m 1 year ago


"Miracle Liquid" - Electrolyzed Water

Http://articles.latimes.com/2009/feb/23/business/fi-magicwater23I think someone with more time than me should see how to do this most efficiently and see if it work!The article:Sounds like the old "Saturday Night Live" gag for Shimmer, the faux floor polish plugged by Gilda Radner. But the elixir is real. It has been approved by U.S regulators. And it's starting to replace the toxic chemicals Americans use at home and on the job.The stuff is a simple mixture of table salt and tap water whose ions have been scrambled with an electric current. Researchers have dubbed it electrolyzed water -- hardly as catchy as Mr. Clean. But at the Sheraton Delfina in Santa Monica, some hotel workers are calling it el liquido milagroso -- the miracle liquid.That's as good a name as any for a substance that scientists say is powerful enough to kill anthrax spores without harming people or the environment.Used as a sanitizer for decades in Russia and Japan, it's slowly winning acceptance in the United States. A New York poultry processor uses it to kill salmonella on chicken carcasses. Minnesota grocery clerks spray sticky conveyors in the checkout lanes. Michigan jailers mop with electrolyzed water to keep potentially lethal cleaners out of the hands of inmates.In Santa Monica, the once-skeptical Sheraton housekeeping staff has ditched skin-chapping bleach and pungent ammonia for spray bottles filled with electrolyzed water to clean toilets and sinks."I didn't believe in it at first because it didn't have foam or any scent," said housekeeper Flor Corona. "But I can tell you it works. My rooms are clean."Management likes it too. The mixture costs less than a penny a gallon. It cuts down on employee injuries from chemicals. It reduces shipping costs and waste because hotel staffers prepare the elixir on site. And it's helping the Sheraton Delfina tout its environmental credentials to guests.The hotel's kitchen staff recently began disinfecting produce with electrolyzed water. They say the lettuce lasts longer. They're hoping to replace detergent in the dishwasher. Management figures the payback time for the $10,000 electrolysis machine will be less than a year."It's green. It saves money. And it's the right thing to do," said Glenn Epstein, executive assistant at the Sheraton Delfina. "It's almost like fantasy."

Posted by elnino2783 9 years ago


Last Day at Instructables

It's my last day here at the Instructables office. It's been a wonderful summer, and I'm glad to have worked with everyone here: at the office, and the people I've interacted with on the site. Curious about my impact this summer, I did a bit of statistical analysis on the last three months, and I wanted to share it with you. It's not completely precise, but it gives a good ballpark. Ironically, though I have done laser cutting, 3D printing on both the UP printer and the Objet, CNC embroidery, and even CNC papercutting, I never bothered to install the office printer. So I had to show my graphs from a laptop screen. Here are my stats, as of August 17th: I published 69 Instructables total this summer in about 89 days, (65 official work days). (I have a lifetime total of 88 from some previous Instructables.) Here's a graph of the Instructables building up over time. (Blue is data; the thin black line is a fitted trend.) It's pretty linear (with a slight dip at the end of July, when I went camping and couldn't post). The averaged rate is about 75% of an Instructable every day this summer, or just over one per day if you only count work days. 63% of my summer’s Instructables were featured. I had a quick learning curve; after the end of May, 75% were featured. It was a little more difficult to extract further data, so the remainder of my statistics refer only to Instructables I published while working here this summer which received over 1,000 total pageviews. Overall, these Instructables generated 294,224 pageviews (almost three hundred thousand!), 89% of which were from unique viewers. People spent a total of 14 hours, 11 minutes, and 28 seconds viewing these Instructables. To the left, you can see my summer pageviews accumulate, and to the right, the day-by-day graph of my pageviews. The peaks on the right graph represent, in order, my Infinity Dress, the Clockwork Beetle, and the Plaster Face Cast. (Since I made these charts last Friday, it doesn't take into account my Temari, which whould have created a spike as big as that of the Infinity Dress over the weekend.) Although those are my top-viewed Instructables from the summer, my favorites are actually these ones: (and working on Psycho Scooter Scramble, of course) I'm glad to have such a measurable effect on the site and the Instructables community. The people of the site and in the office have made a strong impact on me as well. This is the first place where I feel a true sense of community among a group of people I know exclusively through the internet, and I want to thank all of you who I've never met in person for being my friends. In the office, I'll thank you personally. It's been a great summer, thanks to you. I'll still be around the site from time to time, but I can't devote every day to it. I'm finishing up my Neuroengineering degree at Olin and working on a few other things besides. But I'll be around, and I hope to talk to all of you from time to time. See you around, and happy making! -SelkeyMoonbeam

Posted by SelkeyMoonbeam 6 years ago


2008 IgNobel Prizes announced!

The IgNobel Prizes are awarded annually for research which "cannot, or should not, be reproduced"; achievements that "first make people laugh, and then make them think". The prizes are meant in good humour, and many winner pay their own way to attend the ceremonies. Past winners have been known to return to ceremonies in later years to show off their achievements to a receptive audience (this year it was a sword-swallowing doctor).The Japanese team that showed slime moulds can solve mazes sang their acceptance speech.The Winners:NUTRITION PRIZE.Massimiliano Zampini of the University of Trento, Italy and Charles Spence of Oxford University, UK, for electronically modifying the sound of a potato chip to make the person chewing the chip believe it to be crisper and fresher than it really is. They also showed that playing the sound of bacon frying can make ice-cream taste bacony.PEACE PRIZE.The Swiss Federal Ethics Committee on Non-Human Biotechnology (ECNH) and the citizens of Switzerland for adopting the legal principle that plants have dignity.ARCHAEOLOGY PRIZE.Astolfo G. Mello Araujo and Jose Carlos Marcelino of Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil, for measuring how the course of history, or at least the contents of an archaeological dig site, can be scrambled by the actions of a live armadillo.BIOLOGY PRIZE.Marie-Christine Cadiergues, Christel Joubert, and Michel Franc of Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Toulouse, France for discovering that the fleas that live on a dog can jump higher than the fleas that live on a cat.MEDICINE PRIZE.Dan Ariely of Duke University, USA, for demonstrating that high-priced fake medicine is more effective than low-priced fake medicine.COGNITIVE SCIENCE PRIZE.Toshiyuki Nakagaki of Hokkaido University, Japan, Hiroyasu Yamada of Nagoya, Japan, Ryo Kobayashi of Hiroshima University, Atsushi Tero of Presto JST, Akio Ishiguro of Tohoku University, and Agota Toth of the University of Szeged, Hungary, for discovering that slime molds can solve puzzles.ECONOMICS PRIZE.Geoffrey Miller, Joshua Tybur and Brent Jordan of the University of New Mexico, USA, for discovering that a professional lap dancer's ovulatory cycle affects her tip earnings.PHYSICS PRIZE.Dorian Raymer of the Ocean Observatories Initiative at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA, and Douglas Smith of the University of California, San Diego, USA, for proving mathematically that heaps of string or hair or almost anything else will inevitably tangle themselves up in knots. Their paper has one of the best genuine research titles I have seen for a long time: Spontaneous Knotting of an Agitated String.JOINT CHEMISTRY PRIZE.Sharee A. Umpierre of the University of Puerto Rico, Joseph A. Hill of The Fertility Centers of New England (USA), Deborah J. Anderson of Boston University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School (USA), for discovering that Coca-Cola is an effective spermicideJOINT CHEMISTRY PRIZE.Chuang-Ye Hong of Taipei Medical University (Taiwan), C.C. Shieh, P. Wu, and B.N. Chiang (all of Taiwan) for discovering that Coca-Cola is not an effective spermicide.LITERATURE PRIZE.David Sims of Cass Business School. London, UK, for his lovingly written study "You Bastard: A Narrative Exploration of the Experience of Indignation within Organizations."Journal of Improbable ResearchThe site will be hosting video of the ceremony in the next few days.

Posted by Kiteman 10 years ago


my summer as AIR at instructables

My time as an Artist in Residence at Instructables went something like this:  I arrived in San Francisco and arrived at the Instructables office. I was (to be honest, though now I'm so embarrassed by this assumption) expecting cubicles. Instead, there was energy, vibrancy, and TONS OF COOL PROJECTS!!I There were electronics scattered about (which is, like, enough to lure me in for life :).  I  met Noah and a few others. After discussing some contract stuff, he told me to come by for some pizza and ice cream in the afternoon. Sounds pretty cool... So, I went to Tech shop, I was blown away by the amound ot 3d printers, laser cutters and other amazing fabrication tools all under one roof, all waiting for me to use :)  Then ... free pizza and ice cream, and a bunch of new people... sounds fun. I arrived at 4:30 and it wasn't  quite a party, just yet. it was a talk. And an extremely interesting one, with a big portion of the Autodesk community present. So I really started to get a sense of who was in the community, and where does Instructables fit in. Then, I got to see .. DRY ICE ICE CREAM!!! So cool. Actually  enough to entice me to order dry ice for a near future party! Anyway, I somewhat rapidly began to feel right at home. I ordered some parts for some projects and I began working straightaway. I started working on small electronics projects and other experiments related to water and boat robots.  The next day (Thursday) I got a call at 10 PM in the evening… It was Noah. I was working at Tech shop at the time (I tried to work at Instructables office in the morning then head to T.S. in the afternoon to do some bigger scale construction work in the woodshop.  Well, the Redbull challenge had been announced ("games") and they had begun brainstorming how to make… yes, remote control electric wheelchairs, that were controlled by a user who had a blindfold on, and would be listening through a wireless radio to commands from the person in the wheelchair with no control over themselves. Anyway, I headed straight over to Instructables, and the 72 hours began… The next morning, I head over with Randy to pick up our will-call items from Jameco, including arduinos, wireless arduino shields, xbees etc etc. Then we headed to Noah's shop in Emeryville… and the hacking began. An unfortunate thing was that I had to go to teach Arduino at Tech Shop Sunday evening, which is when the actual fun of riding the wheelchair occurred. Anyway, it was a super cool weekend of collaboration and intense work. Oh, and by the way, see here how to make your own: PSYCHO SCOOTER scramble, here.  The rest of the summer continued on, the biggest accomplishment for me was getting Sneel_003 built and tested in the water. A really cool next step would be to get some 123d catch of underwater objects, trying it out at the aquarium, then do some 3d printing of cool underwater stuff. I did various other projects involving wireless communication, using Arduino for various electronics projects, programming joysticks and remote controllers, etc. A really neat thing is that every day at 2 pm there is "show and tell" which is just a quick "go around the table and say briefly what you've done in the past day". So I really got to get a feel for the way that things were working, who was operating on what, what was happening in the office and out of the office. So I felt immediately a part of the family, in a sense. Instructables is a super cool place: the facilities were amazing, the people were vibrant and knowledgable and motivated and fun, and the experience was super. The facilities I used most were: laser cutter, vacuum forming machine, woodshop, tons of electronics, 3d printer… Everyone I met from Instructables and AutuDesk as a whole was super helpful and great to talk to. It is really a great community. Before I left, I gave a presentation of my work during my time at Instructables. Here are the slides:

Posted by gabriellalevine 6 years ago


Shooting at UT Austin

Wow. September 28, 2010 at 4:12 pm The university is closed. Due to the events of today, the campus is closed. Unless you are needed for essential operations, all faculty, staff and students are urged to leave campus. Students who live on campus may return to their residence halls. Because the area around the Perry Castenada Library (PCL) is an actively investigated crime scene it is urged that area be avoided. As you leave the campus, please exit the campus from north exits. Employees who ride buses to work may catch the bus at Dean Keeton or at on 23rd and San Jacinto. Please go to http://www.utexas.edu/parking/ for shuttle information. If you are in buildings near the PCL, please exit buildings from exits away from PCL. Please direct any questions to 1-866-657-9400 Announced September 28, 2010 at 2:06 pm ---------------------------------------------- Important Numbers * Emergency Information Call 512-232-9999 * University Police Call 911 or 512-471-4441 from any campus phone * Environmental Emergency 24-Hour Hotline: Call 512-471-3511 * Fire Emergency Dial 911 from any campus phone or call UTPD at 512-471-4441 * University Health Services 24-Hour Nurse Advice Line: Call 512-475-6877 * Facilities Services Emergency Call 512-471-2020 ----------------------------------------------   Text Message Alerts You can sign up for campus text alerts to get emergency text messages delivered to your mobile device. --------------------------------------------------------------------   Gunman opens fire at UT in Austin, kills himself By KELLEY SHANNON, Associated Press Writer Kelley Shannon, Associated Press Writer – 23 mins ago AUSTIN, Texas – A student wearing a dark suit and a ski mask opened fire Tuesday with an assault rifle on the University of Texas campus before fleeing into a library and fatally shooting himself. No one else was hurt. The shooting began near a fountain in front of the UT Tower — the site of one of the nation's deadliest shooting rampages more than four decades ago, when a gunman ascended the clock tower and fired down on dozens of people. Within hours of Tuesday's gunfire, the school issued an all-clear notice, but the university remained closed, and the area around the library was still considered a crime scene. "Our campus is safe," school President Bill Powers said. Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo expected the school to be "completely open and back to normal" by Wednesday morning. Authorities identified the gunman as 19-year-old Colton Tooley, a sophomore math major. His parents did not immediately respond to a message left by The Associated Press. The 50,000-student university had been on lockdown while officers with bomb-sniffing dogs carried out a building-by-building manhunt. After the gunfire, authorities searched for a possible second shooter, but they eventually concluded the gunman acted alone. Confusion about the number of suspects arose because shots were fired in multiple locations, and officers received varying descriptions from witnesses, campus police Chief Robert Dahlstrom said. Before reaching the library, the gunman apparently walked for several blocks wearing a mask and dark clothing and carrying an automatic weapon, witnesses said. Construction worker Ruben Cordoba said he was installing a fence on the roof of a three-story building near the library when he looked down and made eye contact with the suspect. "I saw in his eyes he didn't care," Cordoba said. The gunman continued down the street, firing three shots toward a campus church, then changed direction and fired three more times into the air, Cordoba said. A garbage truck driver leaped out of his vehicle and ran away, as did a woman carrying two babies, the construction worker said. "I'm not scared, but I was scared for the people around me," Cordoba said. Randall Wilhite, an adjunct law professor, said he was driving to class when he saw "students start scrambling behind wastebaskets, trees and monuments," and then a young man carrying an assault rifle sprinting along the street. "He was running right in front of me ... and he shot what I thought were three more shots ... not at me. In my direction, but not at me," Wilhite said. The professor said the gunman had the opportunity to shoot several people, but he did not. Police said it was unclear whether the gunman was targeting anyone with the AK-47. Oscar Trevino, whose daughter works on campus, said she told him she was walking to work near the library when she heard two shots behind her. She started to run and fell down. She said she later heard another shot. "She's freaking out. I'm trying to calm her down. I've just been telling her I love her and relax, everything's fine," Trevino said. Acevedo said officers were able to track the gunman's movements with the help of students who "kept pointing in the right direction." The police chief said he believes the gunman ran into the library as officers closed in on him, then shot himself in the head on the sixth floor. Police did not fire any shots, Acevedo said. Powers credited the school's crisis-management plan and social networking for quickly warning students, faculty and staff. The university's text messaging system reaches more than 43,000 people, he said. Laura Leskoven, a graduate student from Waco, said she was in a media management class when she received a text message from the university saying there was an armed person near the library. For the next 3 1/2 hours, Leskoven and about 30 of her classmates sat in a locked conference room trying to keep tab on events through Twitter, blogs and text messages. "We were kind of shocked," Leskoven said. "Our professor said, 'Well, we need to get upstairs' because we were on the first floor of the building." Student Joshua Barajas said he usually is in the library in the mornings but was delayed Tuesday when he made a rare stop for coffee. "These little mundane decisions could save your life. If I hadn't stopped for coffee — and I never stop for coffee because it's $4 — I could have been in that building," Barajas said. "It's creepy. I don't even want to think about it." On Aug. 1, 1966, Charles Whitman went to the 28th floor observation deck at the UT clock tower in the middle of campus and began shooting at people below. He killed 16 people and wounded nearly three dozen before police killed him about 90 minutes after the siege began. ___ Associated Press writers April Castro and Jim Vertuno in Austin, Ramit Plushnick-Masti in Houston, and Diana Heidgerd in Dallas contributed to this report.

Posted by AngryRedhead 8 years ago


McMADSAT make and do, show and tell. Scotland's first Maker Event 2009. Full report

Report of the McMADSAT event 14th March 2009, at the Glasgow Science CentreWe had a fantastic day. Outside it was a grey gale of a day, but inside was a riot of colour and activity. The aim was to enthuse the public with the fun of making things from a variety of technologies. Anyone who wanted to, could join in, make something and take it away with them, and all for free. Hundreds of people of all ages came along and had a great time. A general video of the event can be seen at https://www.instructables.com/community/Mc_MADSAT/ (Thanks to Les Oates for making this excellent film for us).I am happy to discuss further with anyone planning their own event, and you can see more about it and the process by which I got the event going, at http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com/ExhibitorsStar Guest, all the way from London, was Professor Maelstromme (AKA Amanda Scrivener), who brought her beautiful creationsWhat can you make from a dead umbrella? Display of the possibilities for reusing the fabric and structure of dead umbrellas.The Tea Party. 1950s style tea party made from a combination of hand made fabric and edible pieces.Cardboard structures from the students of the department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde.Greensteam's steampunkery, 101 uses for a dead keyboard and other examples of her work as shown on Instructables.The Offline Mechanical Blog – a very old manual typewriter with continuous paper available for the public to type their messages and thoughts on for all to shareLemonie (another Instructables enthusiast, who travelled up from York especially) brought his amazing conversion of a VHS player-into-toaster that makes toast with VHS imprinted in it. He also brought his nice LEGO USB stick, a lantern made out of a tin-can & glass. and his *untested* wind-turbine, made from VHS player parts.On the Young Makers stand we had a display of virtuoso Lego constructions and an extensive collection of home made Steampunkery.The self-replicating machine from the department of Design Manufacture and Engineering Management at the University of Strathclyde, the Reprap, was on display and moving but sadly not reproducing on the day.ActivitiesThe public were offered a wide range of free hands-on activities, which ran continuously all day, to 'Make and Take'Soldering - make a solar theremin (or a robot). 16 of these were made and all worked first time. Some were taken for a trial run in the sun and a video of this can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzUZMon3vpA The Stemnet ambassadors helped visitors to make their own Musical Straw Oboes.One of the most popular activities – especially with children – the Stemnet ambassadors supervised the making of many handsfull of Gloop.The Stemnet ambassadors used the plastic Polymorph for visitors to make a fingerprint keyring to take away.Fishy things - Busy Bees Art studio provided painting and collage fishes to make, particularly for our very young visitors.The Glasgow Crocheted Coral Reef invited visitors to try their hands at crocheting and contribute to the growing coral reef, all made from wool and even strips of plastic bag. Many total novices not only tried their hands but actually completed a piece of coral to contribute to the reef. This workshop area was very busy throughout, with visitors typically spending 30 minutes or more participating. Many thanks to my civil engineer pal who ran this.House of Cards - visitors could make and take their own set of the design classic 'Eames cards', which slot together to form fantastical structures. Ideal for recycling old greetings cards.Cable necklets, keyboard bracelets and keyboard film wallets. All made from recycled/repurposed materials from dead keyboards. Popular with adults and children alike.Risk assessments were provided to the Glasgow science centre, for all the activities. There were no injuries and the 'emergency first aid bucket of water' was not needed as there were no soldering or gluegun burns.Participant Presenters30 people were involved on the day, either as exhibitors or as workshop facilitators. An essential component of the team was the group of11 Stemnet ambassadors, most of whom were there all day. It would have been impossible to run so many activities without them. Another group in the team was the members of the Glasgow Electron Club who, with some friends and a Stemnet ambassador, ran the soldering workshops continuously all day. We were particularly fortunate to have two exhibitors travel up specially to take part. Several exhibitors were entrepreneurs who gave their time for nothing, even though the venue rules meant they could not sell anything, nor charge for the activities being provided. This was especially generous given the harsh financial climate just now. Everyone said they had lots of fun.PublicOver 1,000 people visited the Glasgow Science Centre on the day. The BSA/NSEW assessment forms collected only represent <10% of the visitors to the McMADSAT area. Stallholders and workshop facilitators estimated a total of about 425 active participants (people who did an activity, or asked questions and generally interacted with the displays) by 1530 (GSC shuts at 1700). However, even these only represent a proportion of the people visiting the event which, although not recorded, probably amount to about double that, since most of the activities were taken up by children accompanied by other family members. The numbers at any given time were variable, depending upon the GSC's own activities/talks etc. I would estimate that the McMADSAT area was visited by at least 700-800 during the day. From the few assessment forms returned, and from chatting to the public, it was clear that most had come simply because they were coming to the GSC anyway, but some (mainly young adults) had come as a result of internet and email information or because of the Metro article. The GSC visitors seem to be mainly families with children of primary school age. The University of Glasgow Steampunk Society had come especially to make contact with the steampunk element, as featured in the Metro article. We also collected some contact details for future events. BudgetThe total budget for the event was the £500 grant provided from NSEW Scotland scheme. This had to cover all the exhibitors' costs and the costs for the free make and take activities, plus all publicity etc.In-Kind Sponsors:The Glasgow Science Centre provided free space, tables, cloths, technical assistance, without which the event would not have been possible at all.The publishers of Make and Craft magazines, O'Reilly's, did not feel able to sponsor us in the same extent as they did for the much larger event in Newcastle on the same day, but did send boxes of back issues of their magazines to give away, which probably amounted to an equivalent of about £300 at UK newsstand prices.Clockworkrobot.com provided more theremin kits than contracted for, which were themselves at cost price.Madlabs provided free batteries for all the kits they supplied at cost.Instructables.com assisted with publicity and allowed the use of their logo.VenueNone of this would have been possible at all, particularly on this minimal budget, without the kindness of the Glasgow Science Centre. The Director agreed immediately to offer us the space free, plus the use of tables and technical help to enable this event to take place. We were able to partially set up the night before which was very helpful in avoiding a scramble on the day. We were able to get the loan of 4 GSC soldering irons which avoided us having to get personal ones PAT tested. This was the ideal venue for us as it meant we really didn’t have to do a great deal of publicity as we could be sure of an audience from the GSC's normal throughput.PublicityThe event was listed in the NSEW diary and in the university of Strathclyde's NSEW information. Posters were distributed around venues in Glasgow and information posted on relevant websites. A blogspace http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com was set up as a temporary web presence to refer people to. The Metro published a small piece which was a wonderful boost.Lessons for the futureNeeded more helpers and more exhibitors. Outdoor displays would have been impossible as the weather was dreadful, but it is still necessary to have some more dramatic displays as well as the hands on activities. Successful soldering for novices really needs 1:1 or 1:2 supervision. The budget only worked because minimal publicity was done at low cost and all the participant presenters were generous with their time and resources. Anything more ambitious than what was done on this occasion would need a larger organising team and significant sponsorship.

Posted by greensteam 9 years ago