Studding leather

Hey guys, Okay so I came across a bunch of spiked studs which I throught were screw on, but it turns out they're not. The backs look like they should be able to hammer into the stud... but Im not sure of how. I've tried as many ways as I could think of to hammer them in but the stud always slips sideways preventing the back from going in .... Anybody have any ideas?

Posted by lyingsage 10 years ago


pls suggest me a locking stud, which will meet my idea, added my drawing herewith

Respected Experts, i am in need to get this kid a locking stud. i have drawn this in photoshop. if was there any substitute for this kind lock, or and info abt, be kind to share.this is altogether in 3/4inch in size. thanking you in advance

Posted by shinojmahe 8 years ago


Stud Finder Circuit Diagram

I am looking for a circuit diagram for an electronic stud finder (the type of finder that measures the density of the wall rather than a metal detector).  Can anyone point me in the right direction? Christopher

Posted by willowtaylor 8 years ago


how to mount a bipod without a stud

How would i mount a bipod to this?I dont have a swivel stud or screw or anything. my gun is identical to this one.i am not sure if i even can have a screw in it because it is a tube-loader(there is a tube under the barrel and you slide the bullets into this. it can hold either 17 or 18 .22 long rifle.alllsssooooooooo. how would i make a nice non-knex bipod?

Posted by ledzep567 10 years ago


Doornob touch sensor

I took apart a stud finder to see how it worked. Did a quick google search and figured out they work similar to tough sensitive lamps (capacitance). So after soldering an on off switch to replace the push button on it, I taped it to my door, and fine tuned the sensitivity wheel. Now when someone touches the doorknob (on either side of the door), It lights ups.

Posted by boggysandman 10 years ago


Sketchbook Customizing Help

I purchased a pretty standard black sketchbook with a hardcover, and I had this really cool idea of lining the entire back with 2 rows of metal studs. The metal studs are the kind with four prongs that are meant to pierce through whatever material, but with the said material in this case being the spine of a book and all, im kind of lost for ideas. does anyone have any ideas how i can do this?

Posted by canoflaughs 7 years ago


Where do I find a base to make my own stud earrings?

I want to glue (or whatever you recommend) buttons and other small knick-knacks onto some type of stud earring base.I'm not sure if this is it (the 2nd from the left): http://www.silverenchantments.com/bezel-cups-sterling-silver.htmlbecause it's a "cup", possibly designed for a gemstone or something? I was looking for a sort of flat surface w/ a post coming out (and a backing of course) to glue vintage buttons on. Seems pretty easy to me, any precaution? I don't have a glue gun... will superglue work, or is there some sticky crafty substance I don't know about that would stand the test of time?

Posted by betl 10 years ago


Drilling into walls and not electrecuting myself

So these walls have a sheet of wood on them, as in, original wall --> then sheet of wood, painted. Can a stud finder still work with this wall setup? I dont want to start drilling and end up electrecuting myself and or ripping the walls up with too much weight. I plan on doing the hungarian shelfs.

Posted by bronevaya 11 years ago


Power wheelchair controller testing

I just bought a VR2 controller and I want to know how to bench test it to make sure it is functioning properly before I resale it. I do have a good multimeter.  I just need to know which studs to connect the MM leads to on the controller and what readings I should supect to get.  Thanks again for the help?  Manpan

Posted by themanpan68 3 years ago


Need Data Sheet for old diode laser. RCA SG2001

I have been digging though my assortment of electronic components, stuff that has gathered dust for years.  One item I came across still new in the original package is a laser diode.  RCA # SG 2001.  I have tried searching internet with out much luck other than a PDF about how to drive the diode.  ( short pulses high current ) I see the same part number referenced for other products.  I did find it listed but there is no data showing that I can find.  Yea...it is over 30 years old !  No reason not to know what it is or what it could be used for, perhaps for the pocket engraver? Would much appreciate any information anyone may have about this chip.  I believe it is fairly high power IR diode.   It is stud mount with a single lead exiting the center of the stud bolt.  A bit less than 1/4" dia case.

Posted by stuffdone 5 years ago


A parcel delivery box

I am planning to build a parcel delivery box that would accept large box deliveries from things I order on amazon namely.  The boxes vary in size but I am wondering if anyone would weigh in on how large of a package you think should fit.  I have already decided the drop box will be cut into the wall on the side of my garage where I am relocating my mail slot.  That means it will fit between two studs approximately 16" apart, but the height is open to negotiation.  Thanks guys.

Posted by nalipaz 3 years ago


Tracing Plastic Water Pipe Underground.

Earlier today, while removing tree stumps, on of my crew struck water. The theme song for the Beverly Hillbillies came up. "when up from the ground came a bubbling crude! ...oil, that is... " except it was water, and we went scrambling to find the water shutoff. Lawn Sprinkler systems usually have plastic pipe a few inches underground.  No metal.   :.   Can't find it with metal detector. Potential Options: AC wires can be tracked through walls by the electromagnetic flux around them. Stud sensors today also have a circuit for AC wiring. Could something like that be used?  Although city water has some minerals in it, does it have enough to conduct electricity well enough for an electric pulse sensor? If the water in the system was temporarily made salty enough for an EM signal to be traced, would it mess up the lawn once you dumped that salty h2o? Whata bout conductivity of a fertilizer mix? Medical scans- barium- mildly radioactive. mmmm.... yeah. right. Chemical sniffers- sniff out those semi-soft pipes? Like dogs sniffing out contraband in the airport... Use water flow to carry a fine wire through the pipe, then track an EM signal in that wire. sonic imaging (or at least detection- like the stud sensor) ground penetrating radar... That's all I can think of.  Every option I can think of has issues. Is there any precedent for something that works in this situation?

Posted by Toga_Dan 4 years ago


is my desk frame strong enough?

Hey guys. i'm making a desk that's 90in x 30in x 30in.. i will be using a piece of MDF that's 94in x 30in x 3/4in. i plan on using 2 x 4's for  the back and right side of the frame and screwing them to the wall studs. the rest of the frame will be made with 2 x 2's. i plan on using the space mainly as a computer desk. fully loaded i'm estimating about maybe 100lbs on the desktop at one time. i attached some pictures of the my current plans for now as well as the sketchup file. so that you guys know what i'm talking about.. my question is.. do you guys think the frame is strong enough to hold the desktop and about 100lbs of random stuff. thanks in advance.

Posted by NodozFi2eak 5 years ago


Ground Penetrating Gadget

Hello, out there, I would like to find how to build a ground penetrating gadget. I think there are a lot of 'us' would like to have something that can 'peek' underneath the surface of the ground, not necessary very deep. For example, such a gadget that can help fossil hunting tremandously. And it does NOT have to go all the way to Ground Penetrating Radar. As long as it can detect the differences between the matrix and interested object up to say 50 cm in depth, it will be good enough. And it doesn't matter what physical principle is used: GPR, ultrasound, electrical resistance or capacitance, ... (whatever). What I have in mind in such gadget would be tied to one of the shoes (so, it must be very light weight), using wifi to transmit the signal to iPad/iPhone so that the user can just walk and know the place to dig. Any help or comment will be greatly appreciated.

Posted by DinoDragon 7 years ago


Calling all Crafters: The Hub Network's Halloween Costume Contest (US)

Anyone with a little imagination can get involved in the Hub’s Halloween Bash Costume Contest, where we’ll search for the best DIY and handmade Halloween costumes in the country! After submitting photos and/or a video of your costume from 8/16-9/29 we will bring 50 semi-finalists (one from each state) to Los Angeles for a star-studded nationally televised event with celebrity judges, hosts and performances (Martha Stewart is the Halloween Expert Lead Judge this year!). There they will compete to find out who will win each of the six costume categories and take home $1,000, or win best overall costume and take home the grand prize of $25,000 and a chance at a walk on role on the Hub Network’s show, “R. L. Stine’s The Haunting Hour.” For further information or to enter a costume, visit: http://www.hubworld.com/halloween

Posted by hubhalloweenbash 5 years ago


MacBook Pro Case fix-up

So, I made this case last year in July-ish, It used to be a Speck(™) Fitted Case. The old fabric was white plaid but it was getting discolored, so I decided to be creative and take an old shirt of mine that didn't fit and cut it to the shape of the MacBook Pro case. I then peeled off the old fabric and placed the shirt on the case, and I bought Fabric Spray Glue from Michaels and sprayed the shirt till it stayed immobile and flat to the case. I then used a razor to cut off tattered pieces but now the glue wears off on the edges and the fabric isn't as stretchy anymore because I cut so much off the shirt.  I was wondering if anyone had any good tips for a nice "guy-styled" trim to put around the case to cover up the annoying saggy fabric? The material on this case already has black studs all over. 

Posted by Feross26 5 years ago


Replacing an old bathroom fan

This is an idea someone may be able to use, but it does not quite rise to what I would want to do as an Instructable. A widow friend has two bathrooms, each with a very dated bathroom fan in need of replacement. I was able to mount the works (fan motor, fan blade, and mounting plate) for the new fan onto the old mounting plate after modifying the old plate. This saved me hours of work in a very hot confined attic when time and tools available to me were quite limited. Had I torn out the carcass for the old fan and tried to put the new fan carcass in its place, I would have needed to fashion a wooden framework for mounting the carcass that would fit just right between the ceiling joists, all so the fan would be properly centered above the existing hole in the ceiling.  The mounting plate for the new works was just a bit smaller than that for the old works. The height and diameter of the new fan cage were very close to the dimensions of the old fan cage. I began by using a cutting wheel on an angle head grinder to cut through the old mounting plate around the circumference of the old fan cage. Then I positioned the old mounting plate over the new works and its mounting plate. The glass dish that would cover the light bulbs fastens to a shaft that screws onto a threaded stud centered between the corners of the new mounting plate. I sighted across the corners of the mounting plates so the threaded stud was centered. I clamped the two mounting plates together and drilled four holes for 10-32 screws 1/2 inch long and secured them with nuts and lockwashers. (I did need to cut out part of the new mounting plate so the fitting for the two electrical outlets [fan and light] were accessible to plug in both the light and fan cords.) Had the glass dish mounted to the works differently, I would have used measurements from at least two sides to the center of the fan's shaft to position the new mounting plate on the old. Once the two mounting plates were held together with four screws it was a simple matter to put the works into the old carcass and plug in both the fan and the light to their respective receptacles. There was no question the works would fit because they were attached to the old mounting plate that had been taken from the old carcass. The round opening in the ceiling drywall bordered on being too large to be covered by the escutcheon for the new cover/light fixture. I added some drywall spackling around the edges to close any imperfections and gaps. For me this was an idea that worked and saved me a lot of time.  

Posted by Phil B 5 years ago


How to Fix a Broken Pipe Inside a Wall

Here's a quick photo-essay about my Sunday afternoon: An outside hose bibb was leaking around the handle, so I decided to replace it. * I couldn't remove the old hose bibb from a piece of galvanized pipe, so I removed the pipe too, and found what looked like a brass fitting inside the wall. * Once I had installed a new length of pipe and hose bibb, I turned the house water back on, and heard it leaking inside the wall. Thinking I hadn't tightened it enough, I really beared down and gave the bibb/pipe combo a good crank to seal the connection in the wall. That's when I felt a pipe inside the wall break, and heard water start blasting inside the wall. *Fortunately, I have access to the other side of the wall through the garage, so I cut a hole and installed a valve upstream of the break. I didn't have time to do a full repair and re-route the pipe outside, so that's where I've left it for now. It took three separate trips to Home Depot -- represented above by *'s -- which seems about average for me and plumbing disasters. Things I could have learned: try to remove the broken item before going to get parts. That would have saved one trip to get the additional length of pipe. I don't think I've ever soldered copper pipes in a non-emergency setting. Last time, our hot water heater failed the day before my parents arrived for a week's stay. If you'd like to do your own plumbing, I strongly recommend learning to solder on a project that doesn't require the water to the entire house to be off.Thanks to zachninme for taking photos!2008-08-31 Update: Since I know everyone is dying to know how this turned out, I've add a few more pictures. With the right tools and parts in hand, I replaced everything from the broken copper pipe out to the hose bid, and removed the valve inside the wall. The tricky part was mounting a brass 1/2 NPT female to copper 1/2 elbow. Originally, this piece was nailed into a stud and then the copper was soldered on before the walls were finished. I didn't want to make a big hole in the stucco on the exterior wall and I couldn't safely get my torch into the confined space, so I soldered some copper elbows onto this brass elbow and then mounted it with machine screws coming in from behind through the stud (screw heads on the inside where I could access them through the hole in the drywall, and bolts on the other side with the brass elbow where I positioned and tightened them by feel).Having opened a plumbing battle on this front, I decided to fix a bunch of other plumbing problems around the house, which I'll write about shortly in an Instructable.

Posted by ewilhelm 10 years ago


Desk Support

Hey boys and girls. Over the past couple of weeks (due to work, mostly) I've been building this computer desk, the original here, and a slightly modified one. I've built it using 3/4" MDF and have it painted a gloss black, similar to the modified version. I'm currently stuck on what to do for support. In the original, he uses file cabinets and some scrap material for supports. In the slightly modified version, he uses desk legs from Ikea.I'd like to do something simple, but I'm kinda lost. I've had two ideas floating around my head for a while but I was wondering if their were any other suggestions y'all might be able to throw at me. First, I was thinking about making legs out of chain-link-fence style posts.Then I had the idea to suspend it. Attaching a cable to the front "bulge" on each side (see pic.), and attach the other end of cable to the wall. Using a piece of 2x4, or the like, screwed to the studs in the wall to support the back edge's. (I hope that makes sense). I'm thinking suspending it might work, but would require a bit more work.The idea of a floating desk sounds really cool, but I can't think of another way to achieve the effect.Any thoughts on getting this thing off the floor, minus the saw-horses, will be greatly appreciated.

Posted by smkoberg 9 years ago


How can I get rid of the smell of damp concrete in my studio?

I have been working without success on the smell in my 12' x 14' studio for 5 months, so I really hope someone can help me. I can put my nose right up to the walls and the ceiling and the outlets and not smell anything. But when I put my nose right to the floor I smell the dank, musty, yucky smell of damp, dank concrete. The place reeks of it, I can't work in it. I smelled it last October when I was looking to buy the house, I told the inspector about it but he could not smell anything. Everyone can smell something when they open the door, some people can tolerate it but I can't. As soon as you open the door it just overwhelms you. What I have done so far: 1. Had two peg board walls removed and replaced with chipboard, because that was what the other walls were made of. I had assumed at that time that the smell was mold coming from the pegboard. At that time I looked at the insulation inside the studs and it was fine. It smelled so good with that new chip board up that I thought the problem had been solved. 2. In preparation for painting I caulked the ceiling, around the windows, and up against the floors where it meets the walls. 3. Painted 3 coats of Kills primer on all the walls. 4. Painted 2 coats of very good quality semi-gloss paint on all the walls. 5. I scraped off all of the existing paint that was on the floor. It was peeling in places which is what led me to think the smell was coming from the concrete. 6. Washed the floor with a de-greaser. 7. Washed the floor with sulphuric acid, and rinsed it about 30 times. 8. Painted the floor with 3 coats of special paint made for concrete basements to act as a waterproofer. 9. Painted 2 coats of sealer on top. 10. I called the previous owner who confirmed that the studio's monolithic slab was poured without a vapor barrier because code didn't call for it, because no one was going to spend the night there or live in it. He never noticed the smell. 11. In all this time I have run the A/C non-stop, with the windows open, with the windows closed, with no effect. I have even run the heater for a few days. I have cleaned the A/C over and over, there is nothing to clean and the smell is not coming from there. Is there anything I can put on the floor to effectively seal the smell from getting into the air? Why didn't all those coats of concrete paint and sealer do it?

Posted by Ninzerbean 6 years ago


Hack your Servo V1.00: Make a powerful linear actuator using a standard hobby Servo

Hack your Servo V1.00: Make a powerful linear actuator using a standard hobby Servo   Provided you have the tools and the servo you can built this for under a couple of bucks. The actuator extends with a rate of about 50mm/min. It is rather slow but very powerful. Watch my video at the end of the post where the small actuator lifts 10kg vertically.   Materials List Tools list   - hobby servo - standard hobby brass tubing             -OD: 4.0mm, ID: 3.4mm             -OD: 5.8mm, ID: 4.5mm - standard hobby styrene tubing                                                 -OD: 4.8mm, ID: 3.5mm - M4 studding - 2 x M5 washers - 2 x M4 nuts - 5 minute epoxy - cyanoacrylate - grease - multi-strand cables - heat-shrink tubing   - standard tools – screwdrivers, scalpel, files etc. - dremmel multi-tool with ceramic abrasive disk, or similar - hand-drill + 4.9mm + 2.5mm drill-bits - M3 tap - M4 tap - soldering iron - glue gun - small vice - small saw - sanding paper (relatively fine) - small flame torch         http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/material_tools.jpg Procedure - I will be giving instructions based on the dimensional parameters of the Hitec HS-300. The procedure remains the same for any type servo. I strongly recommend you read the whole post before you start. So lets make a start, shall we?   - Open your hobby servo, remove control electronics, feedback potentiometer and mechanical stop on the servo’s output gear.   - Solder new cables on the servo motor’s leads.   - Drill two 4.9mm holes on the servo case bottom cover. These should be located longitudinally along the centre line and 9.5 mm from each end (this applies on the Hitec HS-300 and is also true for many standard servos but depending on your servo type there might be differences). The M4 thread will come out from the servo body using one of these two so this hole must be located directly below the centre of rotation of the servo’s output gear. Be very careful since this alignment is very important! If you don’t get it right you might have to use a new servo! The more accurate you are, the longer your servo will endure.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/bottomCover_potHead.jpg -  Measure the dimensions of the rotating shaft of the potentiometer on the servo’s original electronics – note the geometry in general. The shaft should be flattened right at the tip in order to prevent it from freely-rotating once inserted into the servo’s output gear.   - Take the M4 studding (M4 thread) pick one end and by using the dremmel and the abrasive wheel tool, replicate the tip of the servo’s potentiometer on that end. Start by decreasing the diameter of the thread, rotating it steadily by hand against the abrasive disk (normally to 3.5mm in diameter and at least 6mm in length). Try to think of your fingers as the chuck of a slow-turning lathe. Once the diameter of the thread is down to the pot’s shaft diameter, flatten the tip according to the potentiometer’s tip. The idea is that the thread must be inserted in the servo’s output gear in the same way the potentiometer did before. The better the fit the longer your servo will endure.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_modofication.jpg - On the flat tip of the M4 thread, screw the two M4 nuts approximately 20mm down its length. Following that, insert the two M5 washers. - Insert the thread inside the servo and adjust the distance of the nuts and washers down the thread such that the servo case bottom cover closes properly and the motor rotates efficiently. Basically, you have to make sure that once the thread and the servo are assembled there is no pressure between the servo case bottom cover and the nut-washer assembly. Similarly, you have to make sure that once the thread and the servo are assembled there is no gap between the servo case bottom cover and the nut-washer assembly. Once again, the better the fit the more your linear actuator will endure.   - Once you find the optimum position carefully disassemble the servo, remove the washers from the thread and use a drop of cyanoacrylate on the side of the nut that was in contact with the washers in the assembly. Let the glue to settle for 5 minutes. Unscrew the second nut by 10mm towards the flat end of the thread, and prepare a small epoxy mix.   - Put the mix between the two nuts and screw the second nut back in place. Once in place also use some epoxy on the back of the second nut as well. Ideally you should sand all contacting areas before you apply the epoxy glue. Leave to settle for at least 6 hours (even if you use a 5 min epoxy).     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/copper_thread.jpg - Secure tightly the 4mm diameter brass tube onto a vice by flattening the mounting end and use the M4 tap VERY carefully tapping as deep as possible (at least 15mm). Using the dremmel cut 10mm out of the threaded part of the tube and then verify that the created thread runs along the whole length of the small threaded tube by screwing it onto an M4 screw. Keep the 4mm threaded tube on the screw for handling purposes. Apply a layer of solder on the outside surface.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_solder.jpg - Take the 5.8mm diameter brass tube pick one end and try to sand at least 5mm into the tube (on the inside). Mount the brass tubing on the vice without squishing it and apply a thin layer of solder on the inside.   - Ignite the flame torch, take the 4mm threaded tube (holding it by the screw) and move it on the soldered end of the 5.8mm diameter brass tube which should still be mounted on the vice. Using the flame torch heat-up both tubes and carefully insert the 4mm threaded tubing inside the 5.8mm tubing until is fully inside. Use a pair of pliers and insert the brass tube by holding the end of the screw that sticks out. Hold the threaded tube levelled inside the 5.8mm tube until the solder settles. If you do not have a flame torch use a candle, your soldering iron and your patience :). Remove the screw. The end result will be the cylinder of your linear actuator.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_cylinder.jpg - The cylinder length should be equal to: the actuator’s desired working length (stroke) + length of the 4mm threaded tube which is inside the 5.8mm tube + 10mm for the mounting hinge at the cylinder end.   - The thread length should be: the actuator’s desired working length (stroke) + length of threaded tube which is inside the 5.8mm tube + length of the thread which resides inside the servo casing, which is model-dependant.   - Take the non-threaded/non-soldered side of the cylinder and drill a 2.5mm hole through, 5mm from the tip.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/cylinder_heatShrink.jpg - Cover the entire length of the cylinder with heat-shrinking tube and cut-off any excess bits. The 2.5mm through holes made earlier on the non-threaded side of the cylinder are now covered. Use the drill again to expose them and tap them through, using the M3 tap. Screw a 20mm long M3 studding or simply cut-off the head of a 20mm long M3 screw. This will act as your cylinder mounting hinge.   - Take the 4.8mm styrene tubing and M4 tap it 10mm deep. Cut a small ring 5mm in length and screw it in the M4 thread fully, from the side of the nut that was in contact with the washers (long side of the M4 thread). This will act as bushing between the thread and the servo’s case bottom cover. Ideally you should use nylon, copper or metal bushing.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_servo.jpg - Secure the motor cables inside the servo casing using a glue-gun and use heat-shrinking tube to cover them. Assemble the servo including the thread, the styrene bushing and the washers.   - Screw-on the cylinder and you are good to go! Here is a video of the small actuator lifting 10kg For those of you that have watched my video on the MTR Rover     will understand where the idea of hacking the servo came from ;))   Soon we will be posting assembly instructions, code and schematics on how to modify a standard servo to get full PID speed and position control with 10-bit resolution over 360 degrees – continuous ;)     I look forward for your comments!    

Posted by Antonb 8 years ago


Roof deck over synthetic membrane: water intrusion?

Oops, so I posted this in Outdoors before I found Home. Double posting is irritating but it's kind of relevant to both... I'm new to the forums here (long time reader, infrequent poster), if I just committed a major faux pas, gimme a heads up and I'll take one of these down! Anyway, so the back door of my 3rd floor apartment opens on to what amounts to a raised back yard; the only problem is that this "back yard" is the roof of a 2 story addition to the brownstone I live in, and I'd rather not put my foot through a very expensive roof. I've been looking into decking, and right now my plan is a contact-only solid frame all the way around the perimeter of the roof, with a lip extending over the edge of the roof (to supply stability without puncturing the membrane) connecting to the actual frame of the deck which would of course be placed over the top of the brick walls of the building. From there I was going to face the deck with synthetics, probably with struts placed along the horizontal struts of the roof connected to both the upper deck and sub-deck cross bracing (depending on what materials I use/can afford and their relative strength). My hope is to find a way to make the deck in modular pieces that can be removed for when the roof inevitably needs to be resurfaced. So basically it would be large squares (or irregular shapes, whatever) that would sit on top of the struts/cross bracing with the help of a few screws and provide the deck surface. What I'm worried about is water intrusion at the contact points, such as around the edge of the roof and on top of the studs in the middle of the roof. I know synthetics are much more resistant to this type of failure than older materials, but are they impervious? Where do the pros put contacts so water doesn't leak into the floor below? Even if you minimalize it, the deck will have to come into contact with the roof at some point, or you've found some fancy new way of building I'd love to hear about. A few other thoughts are footprint: the building is an 1890 Richmond row house, could this be done with a small enough profile to increase the value of the property without damaging the "drive by" value? (I was picturing an iron railing to keep the project semi period, and this roof actually connects to the big hulking wooden fire escape, so it wouldn't be marring a virgin landscape) Also, do you think any building codes in the country would allow L bracing and big old bolts to hold the structure of the deck together instead of end-nailing the boards? It would make removal for roof work a lot easier. For the corners, would it be better to miter the ends at 45 and run a bolt through the two of them, end nail an L joint or use a thick metal l bracket and a few bolts to hold the joint together? That was kind of an intense post, I'm just looking to shoot the breeze a little bit with anyone who has any thoughts. Everybody always has their perfect way of doing things, on such a big, high pressure job (if this goes south I'd be poor AND homeless!) I want to really chew on the idea a little bit first. Thanks to anyone who actually read this far!

Posted by Macadaciouse 10 years ago