Indoor Thermometer - Check temp at home while at work

Hello! I sure hope this qualifies as a Tech category! I'm looking to build (or possibly buy) an indoor digital thermometer that transmits the temperature information to my computer over the internet. The goal is to be able to check the temperature of my house while I'm at work, or anyplace else with internet access. Do any of you know of a simple way to build this? Has it been done before? With temperatures here in Washington DC breaking records this week (over 100F) I'm worried about my pets health at home, and more worried that the a/c will go out while I'm away and I'd never know. This could result in the death of my pets, and I'd love to be able to be informed in time if something were to happen and the temperature rose suddenly (or dipped, in winter). Help in the right direction is greatly appreciated!

Posted by Kindlekat 8 years ago


3 "outdor" thermometer in one display

Made a doodle draft http://www.pic-upload.de/view-15029884/534899_4018926638889_1477588234_n.jpg.html would like temperature and hydrometers in different rooms and display in my own room. anyone knows how to to or where to buy?

Posted by itge13 6 years ago


Talking Meat Thermometer - Circuit wizard help

Hi everyone  I am doing a project in university and i wanted to make a talking thermometer which told a blind person what temperature the meat was.  At the very best i wanted it to have different functions for chicken, beef and pork. (So they can cook a medium steak and then a safe temperature for chicken, although the temp for chicken and pork is above that of a beef so maybe i can fit it into one chip. i dunno) I have to make the PCB myself so i was just looking for any help on how i may do it (maybe a mix of a home made pcb and arduino) Any any tips or advice i may need  Thanks  Michael 

Posted by abro100 4 years ago


Cen-Tech Thermometer to PC Hacking

I just got my new $30 Cen-Tech thermometer from Harbor Freight and it's begging to be hacked. I would love to be able to use this thermometer as part of a closed loop system to control a hot plate for soldering purposes. Just inside the battery compartment is a header with four pins. They nicely labeled the pins on the silk screen. I'm probing on "Gnd" and "Tx" pins. I used a MAX232 level shifter to convert the TTL output to RS232 so I could connect to my PC. I then ran the attached simply Python app that dumps the data packets to the console. Each packet has 25 characters and repeats at about 3Hz. My question is, how would one go about decoding the data packets? Some numbers seem constant while other move. I'm hoping the data format is obvious to someone. Note, the reading on the display was around 68.8 degrees F when this data was collected. The readings did jump plus/minus a few tenths while collecting. Any ideas? Thanks, Jim Console Output: 33 15 11 00 3A 07 9B 14 1B 1E 82 FF 15 07 A9 12 F7 01 CA 0B 97 0C 00 00 4A 33 15 11 00 3A 07 9B 14 1B 1E 82 FF 15 07 A9 12 F7 01 CA 0B 97 0C 00 00 4A 33 15 11 00 3A 07 9B 14 1B 1E 82 FF 15 07 A9 12 F7 01 CA 0B 97 0C 00 00 4A 33 15 10 00 3A 07 9B 14 1B 1E 81 FF 15 07 A9 12 F6 01 CA 0B 97 0C 00 00 47 33 15 10 00 3A 07 9B 14 1B 1E 81 FF 15 07 A9 12 F6 01 CA 0B 97 0C 00 00 47 33 15 11 00 3A 07 9B 14 1B 1E 82 FF 15 07 A9 12 F7 01 CA 0B 97 0C 00 00 4A 33 15 11 00 3A 07 9B 14 1B 1E 82 FF 15 07 A9 12 F7 01 CA 0B 97 0C 00 00 4A 33 15 12 00 3A 07 9B 14 1B 1E 84 FF 15 07 A9 12 F8 01 CA 0B 97 0C 00 00 4E 33 15 13 00 3A 07 9B 14 1B 1E 85 FF 15 07 A9 12 F9 01 CA 0B 97 0C 00 00 51 33 15 11 00 3A 07 8F 14 1B 1E 82 FF 15 07 9E 12 F7 01 CA 0B 9C 0C 00 00 38 33 15 11 00 3A 07 8F 14 1B 1E 82 FF 15 07 9E 12 F7 01 CA 0B 9C 0C 00 00 38 33 15 11 00 3A 07 8F 14 1B 1E 82 FF 15 07 9E 12 F7 01 CA 0B 9C 0C 00 00 38 33 15 09 00 51 07 63 17 65 1D 81 FF 2C 07 2D 15 F1 01 00 0C 92 0B 00 00 35 33 15 0B 00 51 07 63 17 65 1D 84 FF 2C 07 2D 15 F3 01 00 0C 92 0B 00 00 3C 33 15 0A 00 51 07 63 17 65 1D 82 FF 2C 07 2D 15 F2 01 00 0C 92 0B 00 00 38 33 15 0A 00 51 07 63 17 65 1D 82 FF 2C 07 2D 15 F2 01 00 0C 92 0B 00 00 38 33 15 0A 00 51 07 63 17 65 1D 82 FF 2C 07 2D 15 F2 01 00 0C 92 0B 00 00 38 33 15 0A 00 51 07 63 17 65 1D 82 FF 2C 07 2D 15 F2 01 00 0C 92 0B 00 00 38 33 15 0A 00 51 07 63 17 65 1D 82 FF 2C 07 2D 15 F2 01 00 0C 92 0B 00 00 38 33 15 0A 00 51 07 63 17 65 1D 82 FF 2C 07 2D 15 F2 01 00 0C 92 0B 00 00 38 33 15 0B 00 51 07 63 17 65 1D 84 FF 2C 07 2D 15 F3 01 00 0C 92 0B 00 00 3C

Posted by jimk3038 9 years ago


Need help with DS18B20 1-wire thermometer IC

So I recently bought a DS18B20 1-wire digital thermometer IC to use with an arduino.  But when I hooked it up, I couldn't get any reading at all out of it.  I have the VDD pin wired to 5v on the arduino, the gnd wired to gnd, and the data pin wired to analog pin 0.  Any help would be awesome.

Posted by dudes 3 years ago


ICL7107 and LM35 based 7-segment thermometer

I'm trying to create a digital centigrade thermometer based on an ICL7107 3 1/2 digit 7-segment driver/ADC and an LM35 linear centigrade temperature sensor but I'm having a few problems. There doesn't seem to be much online about using the ICL7107 with a LM35 and most of the schematics available are for volt meters, but that's not a massive problem as the LM35 gives 10mV/C linearly. I'm just trying to go based on the few schematics I have found but I'm wondering about the supporting components for the LM35 which seem a little too simple. The first schematic I found was from a Hungarian electronics forum and seems to depict a diode and amplifier being used for the temperature sensing which seems like a bad idea to me. The second seems more like what I'm trying to do. The other few things are the negative voltage source, the first schematic shows an inverter being used as does the datasheet, but the second schematic shows an LMC7660 voltage converter which seems like a better option to me. The second one does also show three diodes in series used to drop the voltage for the LED displays which doesn't seem like the best idea, but I can't think of a better way to do it without attaching resistors to each one as the number of lit segments will be variable. The supporting components for the ICL7107 seem pretty consistent between the two and the schematic so I'm confident those are correct, but I'm looking for some advice on how to connect the LM35 in a way that will give me an accurate readout. Thanks!

Posted by andy70707 4 years ago


help creating a biosensor prototype

I will attempt to be as concise as possible. That said, please bare with me if things are explained as well as they need to be, I am very new to this. Determined, but still a novice. I am conducting research as part of an effort to create a wearable prototype. Essentially, I need to combine a ppg heart rate monitor with a infrared thermometer (to measure skin temperature) and to have both devices maintain bluetooth capability. Any input in regards to this would be amazing.  More specifically, I am wondering if there are any DIY ppg heart rate monitor and/or infrared thermometer starter kits? Or resources that will assist with building these elements, aside from tutorials. I ask because it is a challenge to uncover all of the nuance and intricacies with electrical engineering and design without having a sufficient background.  For instance, it is clearly possible to add a bluetooth component to a heart rate monitor, but I am unsure if the two components (ppg hrm and infrared therm) must "talk" to each other while maintaining a bluetooth connection to a website or some other device.  If this is all as "simple" as building these devices separately and adding a bluetooth component to each of them, it would be greatly appreciated if you can provide a specific link to easy sources to obtain the components. I think I can follow along the tutorials, though there are still questions there.  Salud

Posted by ChrisU2 3 years ago


Need help wiring up this digital thermometer

I bought a thermometer and probe from McMaster-Carr, but didn't expect that it'd come without a power plug nor a clear way to wire it to the probe. Instead, there are a few connections at the back and I need a hand to make sure I don't break anything. Can anyone here help me identify the right way to wire this for 110v wall power? Do I put one end of the power cord into the 0 VAC socket, and the other into the 115 VAC? Also, the probe terminates in eyelets, where this wants a raw wire for the connection. I can snip them--is that right? And why are the probe wires red and yellow (the unit has inputs for TC+ and TC-). I've attached a photo of the rear of the unit. Thanks for your help everyone. EDIT: I did some research and figured out that my hunch was correct. One connection to 0VAC, the other to 115VAC, and the probe leads into the other side. Works great, too.

Posted by mikejs 9 years ago


Tutorial: LCD Thermometer with optional Alarm

I created this Arduino tutorial. I hope somebody finds it helpful! Feel free to post any comments or suggestions. http://wellsb.com/post/1328196426/arduino-lcd-thermometer-with-optional-alarm

Posted by 5m0k3 8 years ago


Thermometer for furnace

OK I have created Shark500's furnace (which was an awesome Instructable). I have made some modifications to it. Now I'm curious can some one help me make a inexpensive thermometer for it? I have made mine a bit bigger and I am using a 16oz propane tank as my crucible with about a 1/2" thick cement coating on it and the top is my lid. I figure I could wire a sensor through the old valve but I don't know where to start to make something like this. could some one please assist me in this it would be greatly appreciated.

Posted by Jdogg55 9 years ago


xbox360

Thank you for telling me the 220 degrees C + temperature. With my heat gun .eletric heated pan and a IR thermometer I got the GPU off.But I think I ruined it.So will by a new one off ebay with the solder balls already fixed -Keith tait

Posted by iamkeithtait 7 years ago


Temperature and LEDs

Is there a way to control a group of LEDs or even an RGB LED with some sort of temperature sensor/thermometer? I'm new to electronics and wanted to know if you could have a Red LED glow when something relatively hot/warm was near and have a Blue LED glow when something relatively cold/cool was near by. I'm new to electronics and was just curious

Posted by smkoberg 9 years ago


Water valve on/off control

Need some help! I need to know what to buy. I need to control water flow with an electric water valve to open when the water temp reaches 65 degrees and shut off at 55 degrees. From the valve, thermometer, etc., what do I need to buy and how can I wire it? I know it’s the same concept as a HAVAC thermostat in your home, but I don’t know how to wire it to a relay for the valve.

Posted by opc167 8 years ago


3D Printer Thermistor in a K type thermocouple

Hi all,Quick question before I butcher something unnecessarily.Can I connect a bog standard thermistor as found in Chinese 3D printer (of which I have spares) to a k type thermocouple plug (I have none) and use it in my k type thermometer?Or should I just buy the slightly more expensive correct lead?I want to monitor temps @ the heat break of a new hot end.

Posted by Squibo 25 days ago


Recycling Soda Bottles Experiments

Test 1: heat gun, "high setting"  Plastic Coke bottle SOFTENS + shrinks                                                                  -  at about 250F * Test 2: Heat gun " low setting** " Plastic coke bottle MELTS enough to  make gooey threads , and bubbles   -   at 450 to 500 F *according to a cheapy harborfreight laser thermometer. Not sure just how accurate it is in the 250  to 500F range. This device seems to read 5 degrees high at the 100F range. ** ironically, the temp is higher on the "low" setting. When the fan is moving less air, that air is hotter. One of the tricks, I imagine, might be to fully melt the plastic without burning it.   Suggestions welcome. Further results will follow.

Posted by Toga_Dan 4 years ago


peltier cooling/heating system for transportable animal incubator

I am trying to design a heating system for an animal incubator that can be transported in a car to rescue animals and keep their body temperature level. I was thinking of using the peltier systems to heat the box the animals will be staying in but I'm not sure if they would have the capability of 70-90 degrees fahrenheit. Also the temperature needs to be very specific (plus or minus 1 degree) is there a thermometer out there that would work well for this? I just need some help on learning about these because I've done a little research but I'm still confused on how they work and if I could even use them. Also, is there a good website to buy these on? I could use a lot of little ones or one medium sized one (up to 1ft by 1ft) but not too tall.

Posted by oabf19 10 years ago


Idea for extended version of "Sun Jar"

After seeing the recent Sun Jar I'ble, I had an idea (not even concrete enought to be a Completable) for an interestingly extended version. There now exist LEDs for infrared, visible red, green, and blue, and near UV.It should be possible, with a mix of small low-voltage constant-current power supplies and pulse modulators, to construct a multiple-LED light source which roughly models what we perceive as the solar "spectrum." I don't mean formally reproducing the raw wavelength distribution, but rather the combination of intensities we see (or measure with a thermometer) in a prism- or grating-spread spectral display.Coupling such a circuit to a solar cell would allow you to build a "Sun Jar" which "collects sunlight" during the day and "releases sunlight" at night. As I said, just an idea...

Posted by kelseymh 9 years ago


Peltier Cooler/Heater - Pooling Brainpower

I recently acquired a thermoelectric mini fridge. As a fridge, it doesn't work so very well - it will get down to ~50 degrees with an ambient temperature of 70. So, I took it apart. You know the saying: "If it ain't broke - fix it until it is." So I now have a peltier effect cool/heater. I put my meat thermometer on the cold side with the fan off - and it gets down to freezing (probably a bit below). On the hot side, with a big sink and fan - it seems to be ~85 at it's warmest point (this sink is about half a square foot and an inch deep). Ideas on where to use? It's 110 service.... It literally almost killed me a few days ago when I touched a transistor sink that was part of the rectifier circuit while holding a plate that was grounded (I got knocked out for a few seconds) I've got a couple ideas, I just figured I'd pool brain power and see what happens :p

Posted by trebuchet03 10 years ago


A Transatlantic Tunnel, Hurrah!

Deep beneath the Atlantic Ocean, forgotten for the best part of a century, lies a tunnel linking London and New York.It was built on the whim of a Victorian inventor with the aim of linking two great cities and developing the kind of friendship that still exists today.But bad fortune befell the venture - and the tunnel lay idle ever after.Until today, that is.One end of the "tunnel" emerges next to Tower Bridge on the banks of the Thames in London - the other is next to Brooklyn Bridge on the banks of New York's East River.It looks like something HG Wells might have imagined.Each end has a giant telescope-like construction which appears to punch its way out of the earth.There are dials, and levers, and thermometer gauges on the side of the 20m long brass and wood construction.Peer into it and you can see people on the other side of the Atlantic.Wave at them, they wave back at you.Web-cam it ain't, but the Telectroscope is fascinating. I hope it's stays operational for quite some time.Telectroscope websiteDaily Mail articleBBC StoryBBC Video

Posted by Kiteman 10 years ago


Help with JARVIS-like Smart Home

Hey guys, I am planning to do a project with Smart Home theme. I would like to create JARVIS-like application, which would be able to recognize my voice and then do appropriate action. Example: Temperature Sensor Me: "Jarvis, Show Temperature" Jarvis: -"Temperature displayed sir" I am planning to buy a very cheap Tablet, on which I would like to write an Android Application, which would create "jarvis" and other activities. For example, if I say "Show Temperature" the activity would pop up, where the temperature will be displayed. I will messure temperature with a Thermometer (DS1280 most probably). And I'd like to use a Bluetooth module to communicate Wireless with them. Temp. Sensor -------- > Arduino board ------------> Tablet All of the above are on different locations. I need help with this project, so if anyone could do an instructable on how to do this - would be really awesome! What do I need ? - Temp. Sensor - Bluetooth Module - Arduino Mega - Speech regonition software (BitVoicer probably) - anything else? Also, is the TFT display (http://www.geeetech.com/wiki/index.php/3.2TFT_LCD) good enough to replace the Tablet ?  Meaning, can I write such an Application to this display ? Thanks, David

Posted by DavidDaVinci 3 years ago


Group : Collection of Instructables for class-room and teaching purposes ...

Hi !I created a group that seems not to have been ever created here yet."Class-Room" group.The main purpose of this group is to make a collection of every instructables that may be useful for school teaching, and that may be reproduced by pupils or students as science-fair or class-room projects ...Please, add your Instructables if they fit this description._Biology :"Be a Scientist : map your skin"Chemistry :"Carbonating""Kitchen laboratory II : The CO2 trap""Make crystal clear ice !""Make Rheopectic slime in less than 15 minutes !""Shelling a raw egg !""Sodium Acetate"Investigations :"Amazing Kite For Under $5""How to make Playdough (Play-doh)""Oobleck""Pop-Up 3D words and messages !""The Huffin' Hoopster""The Improved CD Hovercraft."Physics : Electricity & Electrostatics :"Build an Electrostatics Motor""Jacob's Ladder Sculpture from found materials""Kelvin's Thunderstorm : Create lightning from water""Paper Resistor"Physics : Instruments & Measures :"Be a Scientist : Make your own force-meter.""Be a Scientist : Make your own thermometer"Physics : Magnetism :"A simple mechanical resonance demonstrator""Diamagnetic Levitation Experiment"Physics : Optics :"Naff Movie into _DVD-Spectra_""Optical Water-Prism"Physics : Sound :"How to measure the speed of sound ...""Mechanica Wave Driver for Chladni Plate"

Posted by chooseausername 11 years ago


Heating Element for DIY Melting Point Apparatus

Hi Everyone, this is my first post on this site!  I am seeking advice to help me construct a home-made melting point apparatus (M.P.A).  A melting point apparatus allows it's operator to determine the melting point of a chemical sample by heating it in a controlled fashion and noting the temperature when the sample melts.  I have most of the design made up in my head, but I'm not sure as to how I can obtain the proper heating element.  The heating element I am seeking is an emulation of the M.P.A.s heating elements in my school's chemistry lab, which look like this: a metal block (about 3cm tall by 2cm deep by 3 cm wide) with vertical holes bored into the face with a pane of glass pressed against said holes so a glass capillary tube (containing the sample) can be slid into the bored hole and viewed through the glass pane as the sample is heated by the metal.  Another hole is bored into the metal, adjacent to the sample hole, for a thermometer.  So again, my question is do you have any suggestions as to where I could by a heating element like this?  Or, any suggestions on how to build one?  I have a jewelry shop at my disposal so I can probably bore any holes myself.   Any suggestions will be appreciated, thanks!

Posted by Das Horse 6 years ago


Car Heater/ Warmer

Hello I am Melwin from India I want to create a Car Can/ bottle Warmer/ Heater. My Basic Aim is to make hot water for preparing baby formula my baby when I travel with family in my car. This way I can avoid multiple stops for getting hot water. The commercial versions are available in the Market for a minimum of 3000 Rupees. It is very rare to buy in India My plan is to buy a 220 v 1000Watt Heating Element and cut it to suit to 12v When i measured one test setup with such a coil I get around 1.5 Amps per coil. I didnt have a thermometer to test how hot it gets. Since the car Cigarette Lighter supports 10A. I can easily Add 4-6 Coils of the same length in parallel. Also I can add switch to get different temperatures by adding up coil for each switch. 1-2 Coils = Warm. 3-6 coils = Heat. I dont want it to be a huge cooker. It should be able to heat up a glass (200 ml ) of water till 50- 60 degrees C) A higher version can have a Thermostat to cut off things as a safety feature. If this setup succeeds in boiling up water then I can also have my favourite cup nooodles when on long trips with friends I plan to make a small ceramic frame to mount the heating elemmet. On top I will place a Copper plate. Leaving some gap between the Plate and coil. This entire setup will sit in a Tin can of suitable diameter. I need to think about how i get the ceramic frame to Sit inside the can without touching the Metal. To this Metal can i will attach a handle so that it can be handled when hot. My next question. Where do I place it in my car safely. Suggestions/ Concerns/ Comments please Melwin

Posted by melwinmyworld 7 years ago


Let's Make Soap - A Cold Process Soapmaking Tutorial

I get a lot of curious people downtown who want to know how to make old fashioned, cold process soap. So for anyone who is interested in what making soap is all about, here's an overview of the soapmaking process. It is not meant to be used as a tutorial. Because of the many dangers associated with soapmaking due to the use of lye and the plethora of information to be had, I recommend that you carefully research the process before starting out on your own. Details on where to obtain additional information will be included within this article.Soapmaking involves a chemical process in which sodium hydroxide (lye) reacts with oils to make soap. This process is called saponification. Because this process requires the use of lye, important safety precautions must be taken. Rubber gloves and safety glasses should be worn during the soapmaking process, and vinegar, which neutralizes the lye, should be kept on hand in case of an accidental spill or burn. In addition to the necessary safety equipment needed for the journey into making soap, there is other required equipment you'll need to get started. First and foremost you will need to acquire lye. Because without lye, there is no soap. You should be able to find lye in the plumbing section of your hardware store. I buy Roebic brand at Lowe's. The brand doesn't really matter, but it must say that it is 100% sodium hydroxide. You'll also need a large pot for mixing the soap. This can be any type of pot you like - I use my hubby's old beer making pot - as long as the pot is not aluminum. Lye reacts badly with aluminum so remember to never mix the two. You'll also need an accurate scale, I use a digital postal scale I purchased at Staples. And, you'll need a thermometer or two to measure the temps of your oils and lye solution as well. Additionally, you'll find that a stick blender is your best friend in making soap, and then of course there are the molds, soapmaking oils, and distilled water to be mixed with the lye. Read the rest of this tutorial.http://soapdelinews.blogspot.com/2009/03/lets-make-soap-cold-process-soapmaking.html

Posted by soapdeli 9 years ago


Heating Control

I have been thinking for some years now that I would like to have finer control over my central heating. The problem Now we are older we feel the cold more so in winter the heating is on all the time. This means that we have to keep altering the thermostat on each radiator at different times of the day or just leave them and so waste energy. One method means wasting energy but the other means rooms will be colder than we want initially.   The system and what i have We have a combination boiler which has a digital timer and also on the panel are temperature controls for hot water and radiator temperature. Each radiator has a thermostatic valve so each room can have it's temperature set independently. I have a computer which runs 24/7 and also a bit whacker which I can control via python code and electronics has been a hobby for over 50 years My idea I would like to have some system which would allow me to adjust each room temperature via computer control.   Possible solutions Solution 1 Fit a stepper motor to each thermostatic valve to adjust it at different times of the day/night. This would allow precise control but would be quite expensive to set up. Solution 2 Fit a small structure round each valve with a filament bulb or resistance wire in the bottom so that when power is applied to it then the temperature around the valve will rise and so the valve will close or, at least partially close. I think this would be much cheaper to implement but would have the small on-going cost of using power to the bulbs whenever the room temperature needs to be cooler that it would normally be. My initial plan Build a small structure around one of the valves with a low voltage bulb in it. It would have vents at top and bottom and so air would circulate. I have a portable digital thermometer so i could gather information and try different bulbs to see how much power would be needed and therefore what the on-going cost would be. Also try various shapes of structure to see what the effect would be.   So guys what do you think?

Posted by buteman 8 years ago


Global Warming Experiment #1

(I slightly changed the instructable into a forum topic and an instructable)The Instructable Half"Global Warming" Experiment #1:As you can tell by my quotes around "Global Warming", I personally don't believe that this theory is happening. Theres facts I can use to prove this. However, even I believe that no matter how you put it, there's going to be some bias. Also facts are boring :PSo, what I have planned, is to do a series of experiments on what global warming might cause if it were real.I'm doing this because I've heard people claim some extraordinary things, which based on data won't happen.I could post an instructable with a bunch of facts, and I might. But for now, I want to set up a couple collaborative experiments. One reason I want collaboration is I'm biased. The other, is so you can't complain about my methods.I haven't done the experiment yet, I really don't know if this will help, or hurt, my case.The experiment is to determine if "global warming" could melt glaciers, thus cooling the ocean. Notice here I'm assuming global warming is happening. It isn't. But when people make claims on the news and stuff, they are assuming that too.Please comment if you would like to change my methodology, OR you want to do the experiment.I'm going to describe how the Instructable (and hopefully the rest in the series) will work.1) I, or anyone, proposes a framework for an experiments and writes up an Instructable. (Will be referred to as "I" in the following steps)2) I monitor the suggestions, editing and fixing as needed. After about a week or so, I go onto step 3.3) I preform the experiment to the best of my ability, and write up an additional 2 steps.3a) The first outlines my changes. This could mean I didn't have a 4x8 loaf pan, and I had to use a 3x8. Or it was plastic. Whatever. These small details are important3b) The second outlines the data and conclusion. This may have images of the experiment, graphs, tables, sensor data, Whatever. I also make a note of my previous bias.4) Wait for more people to run through the experiment, adding them as collaborators.5) Write up a conclusion to everything, OR do some more investigating.Its not that bad, however the whole process might take a few weeks. (I don't know)Scientific MethodThere are seven steps to the Scientific Method, which we will follow:1. Define the question2. Gather information and resources3. Form hypothesis4. Perform experiment and collect data5. Analyze data6. Interpret data and draw conclusions that serve as a starting point for new hypotheses7. Publish results(Thanks Wikipedia!)#1 was done in the introduction.#2 I've already done, however you only have to look into data you'll need during the procedure.#3 I've done it, but I'm not telling you (I don't want a bias, even though I've hinted towards my guess)#4 - We're going to expand this out. More later!#5 and #6 sort of come together in this format, will be done as we go along.#7 is done as we go!Okay, #4. Remember back to High School, remember Lab Reports? Well basically there will be a step for each segments (leaving some out). We sort of do this already in most instructables "What will happen", "What you need", "How you do it"; this time more formally. Due to Lab Reports being unstandardized, I'm breaking it down into:IntroductionMaterialsProcedureDataIts shorter than your average one, due to the fact in Data, you have hypothesis and stuff I don't want to reveal yet ;-)The following is the framework, you can also see my instructable:(This is a framework, remember. Its not supposed to be "done" and perfect)Materials*Large basin of some sorts.*Water*Ice*Lamp + Light bulbs (100W & 40W)*ThermometerProcedure1) Fill large basin/pan with water.2) Take and record standing temperature of water.3) Add ice off to one side of the pan.4) Take temp. of water every five minutes until it starts to level out, at least 4 readings.5) Replace water, and repeat steps 2&36) Shine lamp w/ 40W bulb off to the non-ice side of the pan, but allowing some light & warmth to reach the ice. (Roughly 20-35%)7) Repeat steps 4&58) Repeat step 6 with a 100W bulbTake pictures throughout!What now?Okay, I'll be updating this with your comments over the next week or so. If somethings wrong with it, POINT IT OUT!!! I'm going to add my thoughts in as well. (I still feel its missing some things, I can't put my fingers on them, though!)

Posted by zachninme 11 years ago


Technology Makes Cheap Drinking Water from Air

INTRODUCTION:   How can we best apply basic technology to help the underprivileged and/or disaster-hit countries like Haiti? Daily hygiene and nourishment are among the top needs for disaster ridden regions!  Simply put, no water means no hygiene. The Romans understood that over two millennia ago and created their complexly beautiful aqueduct networks for handling both fresh and wastewater! Other ingenious water systems like “air wells” have been found in the city of Theodosia (cf: discovered in 1900 by Zibold, see Zibold’s Collectors/Dehumidifiers) dating back to Greco-Roman times during the Byzantine Empire. These were strictly passive systems that naturally dehumidified air, collecting its potable water in underground basins. All air, even in relatively dry desert regions, will precipitate or release its natural water content (initially in the form of vapor) through condensation when it hits its dew-point temperature and below. That means you “chill” it to an appropriate level that is anywhere from 5F to 50F below its current air temperature, depending upon how much water content (relative humidity) it has locally absorbed. The condensation of the water vapor releases its internal latent heat (reheating the cooled air) which must be constantly dissipated (absorbed by something) in order for water formation to steadily continue. So how do we dissipate this resultant vapor-heat and chill our air without any infrastructure or electricity, in an underprivileged or disaster-ridden region? We simply bury a long cast-iron or any metallic drain-pipe sufficiently underground where the temperature of the earth is naturally held to a constant at around 45F to 55F. That’s our “free” chiller gift from nature. One end of the pipe, Figure-1,  sticks out of the ground to suck-in local outside hot air, and the other end dumps cooled dry air and water into an underground cistern where it gets collected and is piped to the surface to both exhaust the cooled dry air and connect to a water pump. We need a hand operated water pump to lift up the water above ground, and we need an electric fan to constantly pump air through the ground-chilled piping system. We can even force the cooled piped air to exhaust into a tent-like structure where it provides air conditioning as an added bonus, but this adds the penalty of both power and the increased fan size necessary to drive our required airflow further into an enclosure! While this concept is not “passive” (requiring electricity to work) like those clever Byzantine air-wells, it will produce much more potable water and within a smaller volume than those elegantly passive historic devices. The electricity for our fan power requirements can be produced by any one of four ways using either “active” or “passive” techniques: 1) An active playground or bike-pedaling-person or oxen-driven mechanism-generator, 2) A passive windmill generator, 3) A passive solar energy collection system that directly generates electricity, or 4) A passive thermo-electric system that directly generates electricity using the Peltier effect, operating solely on temperature differences between the cell’s top and bottom surface (we jury-rig the cool pipe and hot ambient air to contact separate sides of the cell). Depending upon how much water is needed, the required air volume plus pipe length and diameter, together with the fan will be sized accordingly. We can also configure groups of parallel fan-driven air pipes that are radially fed into the cistern. The sizing of this underground network depends upon the ambient air’s local average temperature and relative humidity (how much water gets absorbed into the air) plus buried pipe depth and effective underground temperatures achieved. The basic concept is one where we “wring” water from air at some given humidity content. The higher its relative humidity the more water is recovered from the air. The air-wringing process simply chills the air as it scrubs along the cooled internal pipe surface until it starts to rain inside the pipe from condensation onto its surface. The condensation is like the dew that forms on car windows, grass or any cooled surface in the early morning, before the sun comes out and evaporates the dew back into the heating air. A further bonus is that our dew-formed water is naturally distilled and very clean. It is potable water ready to drink without the need for additional sterilizing agents. Of course, we must make sure that the interior piping and cistern network is biologically cleansed before burying it underground. The hand pump with its 10 to 15 foot extended piping to reach the underground cistern must also be cleansed. The beauty of this constantly replenishable water supply is its convenient underground installation anywhere! After the in-ground installation, we have a virtual, partially passive, no moving parts, non-breakdown system containing above ground total access to all moving parts that could breakdown, namely the water pump and electric fan. Also, it is easily maintained, with few moving parts (water hand-pump and electric fan) and basically lacking any technical complexity which makes it ideal for technologically backward regions. The example below uses a relatively small industrial fan moving air at 1500 CFM (Cubic Feet per Minute) with a DC motor rated at 1kW. This fan together with our underground piping system will conservatively generate 12 GPH (Gallons Per Hour) of potable drinking water without need for any purification chemistry. Based on an average electrical cost of 14-cents per kWh (kilo-Watt hour), the typical commercial distillation of one gallon of drinking water costs roughly 35-cents as compared to our cost of only 1.2-cents. Furthermore, if we decide to go green and use solar energy for generating our water, it would effectively cost us nothing beyond the initial installation! USING A PSYCHROMETRIC CHART TO SIZE OUR WATER SUPPLY: The following gets a little technical and is only provided for those die-hards who are truly interested in how the science works. Those non-technically schooled may skip this part and not miss the basic concept. Figure-2 shows a Psychrometric Chart for air. This chart summarizes some of the basic thermodynamic properties of air throughout its typical range of operating temperature. The chart uses six basic air properties that defines the physical chemistry of water evaporation into air:  (1) the enthalpy or total energy contained within a unit of air which is a combination of its internal and external energy, expressed as the amount of BTU-energy per unit mass of reference dry-air, (2) the specific volume or the ratio of a unit volume of local air to its mass of reference dry-air, (3) the humidity ratio or the amount (mass) of moisture in a local unit of air divided by its reference mass of dry-air, (4) the percent relative humidity per unit of local air, or the mass ratio (expressed in percentage form) of the partial pressure of water vapor in the air-water mixture to the saturated vapor pressure of water at those conditions (the relative humidity depends not only on air temperature but also on the pressure of the system of interest),  (5) the dry-bulb temperature or the locally measured air temperature, and (6) the wet-bulb temperature or saturation temperature which is the local air temperature experienced during constant water evaporation (a wet-bulb thermometer is typically used:   a thermometer that measures resultant temperature while wrapped in a water wet-gauze and spun to generate local air movement and max-evaporation)  1.0   The Process and A Sample Calculation Our Psychrometric Chart uses six thermodynamic properties that help to determine the amount of water available for extraction from the local ambient air as a function of its temperature, pressure and relative humidity.  Let’s assume the following local ambient conditions for the region we plan to construct our water system at:  (1) Typical daily air temperature Td = 106F and one atmosphere pressure assumed at sea-level, (2) Relative Humidity, RH = 55%, and (3) Typical underground temperature down at six feet is measured at Tu=55F (at 12ft. it drops to ~45F). This yields the following calculated results for obtaining a steady-state supply (changes at night) of water to fill the cistern:      1)      In our example, the “local” air (dry-bulb) temperature is Td=106F, at a relative humidity of RH= 55%.  Fig-2 indicates that the resultant Humidity Ratio is HR= 0.0253 Lbs-water/Lb-Dry-Air (intersection of Td=106F line and RH=55% line, then horizontal to HR value).  We then determine the “gulp” of air volume containing the HR Lbs-water which corresponds to the point of intersection of Td and RH. Interpolating on specific volume “mv” yields mv=14.7 ft3/Lb-Dry-Air (this value sets the optimum unit airflow for our given ambient conditions, and creates a ballpark pipe length to diameter ratio needed later). It represents the basic unit of air volume that will enter our underground pipe per given time, and ultimately defines the size of our fan and piping network. For increased water creation, multiples of this unit volume will scale up the additional amounts of water that can be collected. 2)      As the inlet air cools down to a temperature of Tu=55F, from contact with the relatively cold underground pipe, we follow the constant enthalpy line (red upward left-diagonal) from the intersection of Td and RH to its saturated air temperature condition of Ts= ~88F, which is its dew-point temperature where the corresponding local RH=100%.  At this temperature or under, the air precipitates and releases its moisture content, resulting in water condensation onto the pipe walls.  Since our air will chill to a final pipe temperature of Tu=~55F, we follow the RH=100% saturated curve (green) down to yield an HR=~0.009 Lbs-water/Lb-Dry-Air. This is how much water is left in the air when it gets to 55F.  Therefore for every pound of local outside air that enters the pipe, mw=0.0253 – 0.009 = 0.0163 pounds of absolute pure, distilled potable water precipitates onto the inside pipe wall (per pound of dry air that is cooled and dehydrated) to gravity-flow out the pipe exit and into the cistern. 3)      We now convert pounds of air per unit time into a unitized volumetric airflow that yields gallons of hygienically pure potable water production per unit time. For every Va=100 ft3 of local volumetric air movement per minute (CFM) through the pipe, which translates into ma=Va/mv= 100/14.7 = 6.8 lbs. of dry air per minute or 6.8 * 60 = 408 lbs. per hour (PPH), to yield a water-flow of mwf=ma * mw = 408 * 0.0163 = 6.65 PPH or 6.65/8.345 = 0.8 GPH of water.  An industrial fan rated at 1kW DC will typically move 1500 CFM at a pressure of 8-iwc, to continuously produce 15 * 0.8 = 12 GPH of pristine potable water. 4)      Not shown here are the design details of sizing our pipe, fan and solar collection system for electric power requirements using heat transfer principles coupled with a thermodynamic heat balance, and aerodynamic fan performance assessment. These details help to size the electric power generation requirements plus margin used to properly size a solar collector containing further margins for overcast days. The engineering involved here is straight forward but beyond the scope of the current project.

Posted by RT-101 6 years ago


Funny Labels

These are hilarious!!! There all REAL funny product lables that people have found. Here's the link to where I got them: http://www.rinkworks.com/said/warnings.shtml Product Warnings: • "Do not use if you cannot see clearly to read the information in the information booklet." -- In the information booklet. • "Caution: The contents of this bottle should not be fed to fish." -- On a bottle of shampoo for dogs. • "For external use only!" -- On a curling iron. • "Warning: This product can burn eyes." -- On a curling iron. • "Do not use in shower." -- On a hair dryer. • "Do not use while sleeping." -- On a hair dryer. • "Do not use while sleeping or unconscious." -- On a hand-held massaging device. • "Do not place this product into any electronic equipment." -- On the case of a chocolate CD in a gift basket. • "Recycled flush water unsafe for drinking." -- On a toilet at a public sports facility in Ann Arbor, Michigan. • "Shin pads cannot protect any part of the body they do not cover." -- On a pair of shin guards made for bicyclists. • "This product not intended for use as a dental drill." -- On an electric rotary tool. • "Caution: Do not spray in eyes." -- On a container of underarm deodorant. • "Do not drive with sunshield in place." -- On a cardboard sunshield that keeps the sun off the dashboard. • "Caution: This is not a safety protective device." -- On a plastic toy helmet used as a container for popcorn. • "Do not use near fire, flame, or sparks." -- On an "Aim-n-Flame" fireplace lighter. • "Battery may explore or leak." -- On a battery. See a scanned image. • "Do not eat toner." -- On a toner cartridge for a laser printer. • "Not intended for highway use." -- On a 13-inch wheel on a wheelbarrow. • "This product is not to be used in bathrooms." -- On a Holmes bathroom heater. • "May irritate eyes." -- On a can of self-defense pepper spray. • "Eating rocks may lead to broken teeth." -- On a novelty rock garden set called "Popcorn Rock." • "Caution! Contents hot!" -- On a Domino's Pizza box. • "Caution: Hot beverages are hot!" -- On a coffee cup. • "Caution: Shoots rubber bands." -- On a product called "Rubber Band Shooter." • "Warning: May contain small parts." -- On a frisbee. • "Do not use orally." -- On a toilet bowl cleaning brush. • "Please keep out of children." -- On a butcher knife. • "Not suitable for children aged 36 months or less." -- On a birthday card for a 1 year old. • "Do not recharge, put in backwards, or use." -- On a battery. • "Warning: Do not use on eyes." -- In the manual for a heated seat cushion. • "Do not look into laser with remaining eye." -- On a laser pointer. • "Do not use for drying pets." -- In the manual for a microwave oven. • "For use on animals only." -- On an electric cattle prod. • "For use by trained personnel only." -- On a can of air freshener. • "Keep out of reach of children and teenagers." -- On a can of air freshener. • "Remember, objects in the mirror are actually behind you." -- On a motorcycle helmet-mounted rear-view mirror. • "Warning: Riders of personal watercraft may suffer injury due to the forceful injection of water into body cavities either by falling into the water or while mounting the craft." -- In the manual for a jetski. • "Warning: Do not climb inside this bag and zip it up. Doing so will cause injury and death." -- A label inside a protective bag (for fragile objects), which measures 15cm by 15cm by 12cm. • "Do not use as ear plugs." -- On a package of silly putty. • "Please store in the cold section of the refrigerator." -- On a bag of fresh grapes in Australia. • "Warning: knives are sharp!" -- On the packaging of a sharpening stone. • "Not for weight control." -- On a pack of Breath Savers. • "Twist top off with hands. Throw top away. Do not put top in mouth." -- On the label of a bottled drink. • "Theft of this container is a crime." -- On a milk crate. • "Do not use intimately." -- On a tube of deodorant. • "Warning: has been found to cause cancer in laboratory mice." -- On a box of rat poison. • "Fragile. Do not drop." -- Posted on a Boeing 757. • "Cannot be made non-poisonous." -- On the back of a can of de-icing windshield fluid. • "Caution: Remove infant before folding for storage." -- On a portable stroller. • "Excessive dust may be irritating to shin and eyes." -- On a tube of agarose powder, used to make gels. • "Look before driving." -- On the dash board of a mail truck. • "Do not iron clothes on body." -- On packaging for a Rowenta iron. • "Do not drive car or operate machinery." -- On Boot's children's cough medicine. • "For indoor or outdoor use only." -- On a string of Christmas lights. • "Wearing of this garment does not enable you to fly." -- On a child sized Superman costume. • "This door is alarmed from 7:00pm - 7:00am." -- On a hospital's outside access door. • "Beware! To touch these wires is instant death. Anyone found doing so will be prosecuted." -- On a sign at a railroad station. • "Warning: do not use if you have prostate problems." -- On a box of Midol PMS relief tablets. • "Product will be hot after heating." -- On a supermarket dessert box. • "Do not turn upside down." -- On the bottom of a supermarket dessert box. • "Do not light in face. Do not expose to flame." -- On a lighter. • "Choking hazard: This toy is a small ball." -- On the label for a cheap rubber ball toy. • "Not for human consumption." -- On a package of dice. • "May be harmful if swallowed." -- On a shipment of hammers. • "Using Ingenio cookware to destroy your old pots may void your warranty." -- A printed message that appears in a television advertisement when the presenter demonstrates how strong the cookware is by using it to beat up and destroy a regular frying pan. • "Do not attempt to stop the blade with your hand." -- In the manual for a Swedish chainsaw. • "Do not dangle the mouse by its cable or throw the mouse at co-workers." -- From a manual for an SGI computer. • "Warning: May contain nuts." -- On a package of peanuts. • "Do not eat." -- On a slip of paper in a stereo box, referring to the styrofoam packing. • "Do not eat if seal is missing." -- On said seal. • "Remove occupants from the stroller before folding it." • "Access hole only -- not intended for use in lifting box." -- On the sides of a shipping carton, just above cut-out openings which one would assume were handholds. • "Warning: May cause drowsiness." -- On a bottle of Nytol, a brand of sleeping pills. • "Warning: Misuse may cause injury or death." -- Stamped on the metal barrel of a .22 calibre rifle. • "Do not use orally after using rectally." -- In the instructions for an electric thermometer. • "Turn off motor before using this product." -- On the packaging for a chain saw file, used to sharpen the cutting teeth on the chain. • "Not to be used as a personal flotation device." -- On a 6x10 inch inflatable picture frame. • "Do not put in mouth." -- On a box of bottle rockets. • "Remove plastic before eating." -- On the wrapper of a Fruit Roll-Up snack. • "Not dishwasher safe." -- On a remote control for a TV. • "For lifting purposes only." -- On the box for a car jack. • "Do not put lit candles on phone." -- On the instructions for a cordless phone. • "Warning! This is not underwear! Do not attempt to put in pants." -- On the packaging for a wristwatch. • "Do not wear for sumo wrestling." -- From a set of washing instructions. See a scanned image. ________________________________________ Assurances: • "Safe for use around pets." -- On a box of Arm & Hammer Cat Litter. ________________________________________ Small Print From Commercials: • "Do not use house paint on face." -- In a Visa commercial that depicts an expecting couple looking for paint at a hardware store. • "Do not drive cars in ocean." -- In a car commercial which shows a car in the ocean. • "Always drive on roads. Not on people." -- From a car commercial which shows a vehicle "body-surfing" at a concert. • "For a limited time only." -- From a Rally's commercial that described how their burgers were fresh. ________________________________________ Signs and Notices: • "No stopping or standing." -- A sign at bus stops everywhere. • "Do not sit under coconut trees." -- A sign on a coconut palm in a West Palm Beach park circa 1950. • "These rows reserved for parents with children." -- A sign in a church. • "All cups leaving this store, rather full or empty, must be paid for." -- A sign in a Cumberland Farms in Hillsboro, New Hampshire. • "Malfunction: Too less water." -- A notice left on a coffee machine. • "Prescriptions cannot be filled by phone." -- On a form in a clinic. • "You could be a winner! No purchase necessary. Details inside." -- On a bag of Fritos. • "Fits one head." -- On a hotel-provided shower cap box. • "Payment is due by the due date." -- On a credit card statement. • "No small children." -- On a laundromat triple washer. • "Warning: Ramp Ends In Stairs." -- A sign, correctly describing the end of a concrete ramp intended for handicap access to a bridge. ________________________________________ Safety Procedures: • "Take care: new non-slip surface." -- On a sign in front of a newly renovated ramp that led to the entrance of a building. • "In case of flood, proceed uphill. In case of flash flood, proceed uphill quickly." -- One of the emergency safety procedures at a summer camp. ________________________________________ Ingredients: • "Ingredients: Artificially bleached flour, sugar, vegetable fat, yeast, salt, gluten, soya flour, emulsifier 472 (E) & 481, flour treatment agents, enzymes, water. May contain: fruit." -- The ingredients list on a package of fruit buns. • "100% pure yarn." -- On a sweater. • "Some materials may irritate sensitive skin. Please look at the materials if you believe this may be the case. Materials: Covering: 100% Unknown. Stuffing: 100% Unknown." -- On a pillow. • "Cleans and refreshes without soap or water. Contains: Water, fragrance & soap." -- On the packet for a moist towelette. See a scanned image. ________________________________________ Instructions: • "Remove the plastic wrapper." -- The first instruction on a bag of microwave popcorn; to see the instructions, one first has to remove the plastic wrapper and unfold the pouch. • "Take one capsule by mouth three times daily until gone." -- On a box of pills. • "Open packet. Eat contents." -- Instructions on a packet of airline peanuts. • "Remove wrapper, open mouth, insert muffin, eat." -- Instructions on the packaging for a muffin at a 7-11. • "Use like regular soap." -- On a bar of Dial soap. • "Instructions: usage known." -- Instructions on a can of black pepper. • "Serving suggestion: Defrost." -- On a Swann frozen dinner. • "Simply pour the biscuits into a bowl and allow the cat to eat when it wants." -- On a bag of cat biscuits. • "In order to get out of car, open door, get out, lock doors, and then close doors." -- In a car manual. • "Please include the proper portion of your bill." -- On the envelope for an auto insurance bill. • "The appliance is switched on by setting the on/off switch to the 'on' position." -- Instructions for an espresso kettle. • "For heat-retaining corrugated cardboard technology to function properly, close lid." -- On a Domino's sandwich box. ________________________________________ Requirements: • "Optional modem required." -- On a computer software package.

Posted by LoneWolf 7 years ago