art welding

I want to get into art welding and don't have any welding experience. Where can I go to get welding instruction and guidance for small projects. I don't know the difference between a TIG, MIG, or Arc welders. Which one is the best to learn on?Not intrested in jewelry. Thanks

Posted by bouche 11 years ago


Jury-rig it contest...

Either the requirements for the contest failed to be made clear, or the entries were assessed and chosen on a different set of requirements. It seems to me that a lot of the entries were on the fine line of professional engineering, not a fast solution to an everyday problem. Paracord fishing lure? Of course. Frankenstein laser engraver? Not very 'McGyver-ish,' more 'Einstein-ish.' Sour grapes? Maybe, as I had en entry. But I still say that the automatic TIG feeder was 'engineered' not 'McGyvered'. Maybe the contest itself should have won.

Posted by chokapi 5 years ago


Links not forming properly in comments

Exactly what is says in the title. I have twice recently left a comment with a link attached to text, only for the link not to work*. The text goes orange, but nothing happens when you click on it. The comments I left were here and here. Links as text, just in case: https://www.instructables.com/id/TIG-Welded-Steel-Vase/  https://www.instructables.com/community/DAILY-VIEWS-UPDATER/?comments=all#CC1EGT8ICRXR5X8 (*Was that a sentence? I think it was a sentence, but it doesn't feel like a sentence...)

Posted by Kiteman 3 years ago


gear ratio on a 42 cc chainsaw powerd bike

HI! Im new to instructables and Im wondering what kind of ratio of sprocket i will need to mount a chainsaw engine on a 26 inch bike i want to use pre existing bike sprockets that i can some how mount on the rear tire. ideas? i have the ability to use a mig/tig/oxy welders. also what kind of/ size sprockets will i need to mount.

Posted by noahwinter357 5 years ago


Help needed making a pause system for smartphone headphones

Hi guys, I'd like to take an existing pair of headphones (not a specific pair, I can buy a suitable pair if this will make things easier) and implement a switch that will automatically pause my android music when a switch is pressed. Specifically, I'd like the music to pause when a circuit is broken. Since Android will automatically pause music when the headphone jack is removed I can't imagine this would be too difficult to build. However I would also like the music to automatically start again when the circuit is closed again. I'm not overly tech savvy but I think this project is within the realm of my capabilities! Any thoughts or help would be much appreciated! Regards, Tig

Posted by tig5 5 years ago


Where have all the EE's gone; long time passing......

I'm trying to upgrade the control circuit on my cheap TIG welder. The existing control is a 10k ohm potentiometer, mounted on the welder. It's wired up such that the voltage drop across the pot is proportional to the welders output. Instead of having one knob that controls the output, I want one knob on the welder's panel that selects the maximum output, and another knob ( to be mounted in a foot pedal control) that allows me to select output power from zero up to the maximum value that is set on the panel knob. Seems to me that there should be a relatively simple, elegant solution that gets covered in the second year of an electrical engineering course. Or am I just insane to think that such a thing should be simple? I've tapped out my own social network, and I can't find anyone who will admit to being an electrical engineer. Thanks.

Posted by CTroyer 9 years ago


Get a Jump Start on Your Project at TechShop Menlo Park This Saturday

If you have a project in mind that you want to make, but you're not sure how to get started, the folks at TechShop invite you to come to the TechShop Project Kickoff and BBQ on Saturday, October 4 from 10 AM to 5 PM at TechShop Menlo Park and get expert help.A panel of expert makers (including TechShop staff, TechShop Instructors, and TechShop's founder Jim Newton) will field your questions, offer advice, and help get you moving in the direction of success with your project, no matter how big or small.This event is free and open to everyone who has a project they want to build, and you don't need to be a TechShop member to attend. Just bring your project ideas and your thinking cap.TechShop is a membership-based DIY workshop that gives you access to tools and equipment, wide-open workspace, expert instruction, and a vibrant community of makers so you can build the things you have always wanted to make.TechShop Menlo Park Web Site: http://www.techshop.ws

Posted by TechShopJim 9 years ago


Engineering Fellowship

Re:char seeks an entrepreneurial engineer ready to change the world. You'll be working with our 5-person team, operating out of a shipping container workshop of our own (evolving) design. A willingness to work on a start-up schedule and ability to live, full-time, in Kenya is essential. Requirements: -BS in a technical field or beyond-equivalent work experience. -A willingness and desire to spend extended periods of time working in developing countries -Experience with the following techniques: welding, 3d design, fabrication, improvisation -Interest in and familiarity with low-cost design principles for bottom of the pyramid customers Ideal candidates will also possess the following: -Experience/interest in agricultural technologies -Familiarity with biochar/charcoal production technologies -Familiarity with combustion/fuel chemistry Some of the more interesting tools you'll have 24/7 access to include: -4'x4' plasmacam cnc, with parts to build several DIY cnc setups ordered -multiple welding processes (tig, oxy, arc, spot) -extensive metalworking and woodworking equipment This fellowship will last for 6-12 months; a strong performer may then be offered a long-term, equity position **This position is paid, with a small stipend + expenses** **You should only apply if you care more about making awesome stuff than rolling in piles of money** To apply, email me ( luke@re-char.com ) the following: 1. Your resume 2. An explanation of why you want this job 3. 1 picture each and a 1-sentence description of the 3 things you've built of which you are most proud 4. A description of one thing you'd want to build in the shipping container shop and sell to customers in developing countries -Luke  

Posted by liseman 6 years ago


Large Boston-Area Cooperative Fabrication Facility Seeks Members

A friend writes:Need to do some machining? How about electronic assembly? Want to join a community of other people who are doing the same sorts of things?A new collaborative fabrication facility is starting up in Somerville, and it's seeking additional members. This will be a nonprofit enterprise, supporting the rental of space and buying additional high-end tools via memberships. A membership gets you access to three different spaces:o A 2500-square-foot wood- and metalworking shop in Union Square, with industrial-sized table saws, lathes, mills, drill presses, grinders, sanders, MiG and TiG welders, and so forth.o A smaller fab shop in Davis Sq with smaller and/or lighter-duty versions of some of the same tools, for smaller projects.o An adjacent space for hacking electronics, soldering, hanging out, using computers, etc. This space is likely to have a darkroom as well.The current plan is to have the two smaller spaces available 24x7, and the larger space available all day and evening but probably not overnight.This venture is just coming up; the spaces will be available for use around Oct 1, and tours can be arranged beforehand. We've had several introductory meetings to tell people about the space & will likely have another one soon if there's additional interest.We're already mostly at the number of members required to break even; additional memberships will help pay for higher-end stuff like lasercutters and so forth. If this turns out to be so popular that the shops are likely to be too crowded, there will be a waiting list for those who sign up too late.Membership prices currently range from $100/month to $1000/year, with various amounts of storage on-site if desired. Membership prices for those who join after the introductory period will likely be higher, to help support buying more expensive toys.Some early pictures of the larger space are below (taken during a tour a month or so ago); not every tool that might appear in the pictures will be there when it opens, and there will be significant improvements in the space sometime soon, but it should give you an idea. The other two spaces don't have photos available yet (in fact, we're currently doing demolition & remodelling in one this week).http://flickr.com/photos/27076997@N00/sets/72157603801290559/https://www.new.facebook.com/album.php?aid=144093&l;=31aac&id;=769825583More info:http://willoughbybaltic.squarespace.com/http://willoughbybaltic.squarespace.com/new/big-changes-at-wb.htmlTo sign up, go to:https://mgarniss.wufoo.com/forms/member-application/

Posted by ewilhelm 9 years ago


Make SF Meeting

This past Sunday I went to the Make SF meeting graciously hosted by Tech Shop in Menlo Park. I unfortunately do not have names and/or links to work relevant to the presenters, but I will try to give an overview of what I saw as best I can.The first presenter showed a musical interface he made with a laser pointer and a photocell that altered a track of music to correspond with the disturbance of the surface of the water. He told of how he embedded many such bowls in a table and had the laser pointers shining straight down into them from the ceiling so that it seemed as though the water itself was changing the music. He used it a party the previous weekend (side note: I never get invited to parties nearly as cool).Followed him was a man that created a device to interface with a computer as a USB HID. In short, it pretended to be a keyboard, mouse or joystick and then you could send it commands from a micro controller. He had his device installed in a model plane and based on accelerometer readings used it to control a flight simulator. Next there was a man from Google who showed the low-cost Arduino based glowing orb that he was working on based on the Arduino Orb Build Warden. This was presented as one possible solution to have widespread visual indication for monitoring the status of their ongoing projects. Presenter #4 promised not to have anything quite as high tech and passed around a copper bracelet made using copper wiring and traditional cold forge methods. He then spent the rest of the time talking about how he welded the ends of the bracelet with a tig welder made from a microwave much like this one. And even though he promised not to have anything technical to show, he went into the finer points of building your own microwave welder in regards to transformer modification and the importance of finding a reliable metal foot pedal to control the weld. Lastly, someone came from Shape Lock and demonstrated his "Ultra-High Molecular Weight Low Temperature Thermoplastic." Or in other words, you stick it in a pot of water heated to 160 degrees for a few minutes, take it out and bend it into any shape you want, let it harden for a few more minutes and you're good to go. You can use it to quickly and easily make all kinds of high-strength custom shapes and fasteners. It is actually very cool. However, remember, don't stick it in your mouth (or anywhere else!) because albeit non-toxic it will lock your jaw shut and good luck getting that back to 160 degrees. Oh... I should also mention that the meeting was organized and hosted by the legendary Andrew Milmoe.And that summarizes what I saw and heard.The next meeting will most likely be the first Sunday in March and you can get more info on the official Make SF site. Also, there will be a Make SF social gathering next Thursday at Mars Bar in San Francisco (7th and Brannan).It starts around 7 PM and there is rumored to be a special robotic guest attending. (if anyone has more info on any of the presenters please let me know)

Posted by randofo 10 years ago


Fozzy13's AiR Experience!

Being an Artist in Residence at Instructables was an amazing experience.  It's difficult to put into words but I'll give it my best shot. Let's start at the beginning!  Because where else would you start?  I'm a college student, but I wasn't when I started to love building things.  A knee injury years ago took me out of wrestling for a summer and I used my ample free time during that time period quickly filled up as I was excited by the idea of breaking water into hydrogen and oxygen.  Over the past five years, I've grown to love making all sorts of things.  Instructables has always been a fantastic community to get ideas for projects and share what I've made.  After being part of the community for so long I wanted a chance to be a bigger part of Instructables and have the opportunity to meet some of the people who I've been following on this website for years!  Hopefully that only sounds mildly creepy.  The Artist in Residence program allowed me to have just that opportunity. I had the honor of being one of the very first Artists to make use of Instructables/Autodesk's brand new facility.  It's incredible.  If you're on a tour, it will be referred to as the greatest workshop and creative space in the world, and after working in it for a month,  that's an easy statement for me to believe.  The metal shop is where I loved spending most of my time as I worked on my main project: a jet engine.  However, I barely scratched the surface of what's possible even when I dabbled in playing around with 3D printing and laser cutting.  I'll post links to the projects I did when I'm done at the bottom of this post! I could go on and on about how exciting it was to learn how to TIG weld, or pull my first 3D printed object out of the printer for cleaning.  That's not what I loved most about being an Artist in Residence.  Don't get me wrong, that's why I was there, and I loved every minute of it!  But what I loved most was just being in the office at Instructables.  It was an amazing feeling to get to interact with lots of different people who all in some way loved to make things.  Being around people who know what Maker Faire is meant a lot to me!  Usually mentioning it only yields confused faces in my city.  It was great getting to talk about different projects people had done or were working on, which made me love "Build Day"s more than anything.  Being at the headquarters of Maker Culture made me feel at home. I've been away from the Pier where Instructables HQ is for a few weeks now.  I miss everyone I got to meet there, and I miss having the resources to make anything I could imagine.  Being and Artist in Residence will always be one of my best memories ever, and I can only hope that at some point I'll end up back at Instructables to see the awesome people I met and build some more cool stuff. Thank you to everyone at Instructables who made my short stay a great experience!  I can't thank you enough. - Projects! https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Make-a-Mini-Compressed-Air-Turbine/ https://www.instructables.com/id/3D-Printed-Modular-Ball-and-Socket-Joints/ https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-your-own-Instructables-Robot-Keychain Jet Engine Instructable coming later!

Posted by fozzy13 5 years ago


An embarrassment of riches

I was an Artist in Residence at Instructables from September-December 2013, and words cannot express how wonderful it was.  Instructables has recently built out what I can only imagine is the world's greatest general use workshop, at Autodesk's Pier 9 facility.  You are probably aware of this shop if you're reading Artist in Residency posts, but if not, check out the overview here and the machine details here.  I tried to learn and do EVERYTHING in this shop!  I didn't quite succeed in that but I came close enough that I didn't totally finish any of my projects.  I'd planned to make an articulated model of an Escher drawing and an 8 foot tall steel dinosaur statue, both projects I could probably have spent all my time there on.  There was so much awesome to learn about and experiment with, though, that I kept getting distracted by side projects and what-if's that I might not have had opportunity to mess around with later on.  So what I actually ended up making was a series of acrylic jewelry, two small cardboard dinosaur models, MOST of the Escher drawing (I finished it later), some sheet metal walking-leg linkage experiments, half of a new Mustache Ride, part of a sixth Pulse of the City heart, tests of chemically-mediated etching on metal, a pair of 3d printed snowflake ornaments, and the beginnings of a pair of antler pants.  (I will definitely write instructables for the dinosaur and the pants, when they are complete.) I loved it all.  I loved it all so much, and so consistently, that I had to try everything and was hardly able to finish anything.  I cut metal on the waterjet, I printed many 3d things on the 3d printers, I lased like it was going out of style, I lathed like I didn't know what I was doing (Yay Learnings!), I cut and welded and drilled and screwed and printed and ground and sewed and soldered and blasted and glued.  I was like a kid in a candy shop who can't finish the fudge because the lollipops are so tasty and then whoa! peanut brittle! peppermints! gumdrops!  The only part of the shop I didn't use was the test kitchen because, well, I don't really cook. Three months was not enough.  Three years would not be enough.  I feel so fortunate to have been in there doing anything at all for any amount of time, though.  Things I can do now that I couldn't do last summer include: turn wood on a lathe cut metal, stone, cardboard, etc on a waterjet etch metal on a laser printer operate a small vacuum former print multiple materials on an Objet Connex run a jointer and planer operate a Shopbot TIG weld aluminum (to be sure, I'm lousy at this still, but I know How) operate a sand blaster bend steel tubes I'm an introverted anti-social nerd so it has taken me to the bottom of this post to talk about the people.  I absolutely need to say how great the people there are - everyone, no matter their job description, makes things.  Everyone just gets how it is to lose yourself in making some weird possibly useless object that you might have to get rid of when you're done anyway, but you just need to work on it to figure out That One Thing that you didn't quite understand but now you do!  It is a rare and wonderful set of people.  And some of the people, it is explicitly their JOB to teach me about all the equipment and help me with any problems I had with anything at all. If you're reading this you should definitely apply for this program.  You do not want to miss out on working in this shop.

Posted by rachel 4 years ago