Where to buy JB Weld

I tend to do a good bit of research when I purchase anything. I will spend hours finding the deal that will save me five cents. While this doesn't make much financial sense for me, maybe it will end up being worth it if you can save a few cents in the process!The only step to this instructable is a list of the best places I've found to purchase JB Weld. For those who are not familiar with JB Weld, it is, simply put, God, in a tube. It is an epoxy that when mixed (and mix quickly, you only have about 20 minutes of pliability) will set within 4-6 hours, and cure within 24. Once cured, it has the strength of steel, can bind with glass, and neatest of all, is actually conductive enough to use as solder!Note that I'm only referring to the original JB Weld, model 8265 (and 8265-S). I find the stick version doesn't adhere as well, and the "Kwick" version isn't as strong. I also tend to be stubborn and just stick with what I'm comfortable with.Since the invention of Duct Tape (genuflect) nothing has been so valuable to mankind. Thus, it's not surprising to find it anywhere from $9.99 a tube, up to $14.99 per tube. So how much should you be paying for your J.B. Weld?If ordered online, you can get it for as little as $2.95 per tube!Note: These prices are only accurate as of the posting of this instructable (29 June 2009)Okay, so if you've come this far, $2.95 per tube sounds pretty exciting. Keep in mind though that you're also going to end up dealing with shipping, so we'll see what the end result will be. When in doubt, if you have a local Ace Hardware, Lowes, Home Depot, etc. look there first. You avoid shipping, and the Ace online outlet sells it for as little as $3.25 per tube (No idea why nobody else, including Sears, KMart, Target, etc. carries it online). If you can find it in the store for that price, that would be your best bet. But assuming you don't have a local Ace Hardware, or since they're locally owned the Franchise Owner is a prick that overprices things, let's see how the following websites work out.First, it's important to note that while you will find many other places online that claim to sell the JB Weld for as little as $2.95 per tube, just try to purchase them. I'll wait... Back? So as you saw, 99.9% of these sites use the Amazon.com checkout system, and only allow ONE TUBE AT A TIME to be purchased. They then hit you with a $4.99 shipping fee for each pop, and now you're back to paying $8 per tube.On to the real suppliers:#1) Tool Explosion - The best price I've found with free shipping, but their free shipping minimum purchase is $100, and their JB Weld was only $3.76 per tube when last checked! One of the better deals out there. Between $100-$130 worth, this was the best deal I could find.#2) Alexandria General Supply - To get the $2.95 price here, you have to buy in 6 packs, otherwise it's more expensive. But hey, more JB Weld can only be a good thing. They seem to have a starting-rate of $17.05 for shipping, which is nearly as much as the 6-pack of JB Weld, making them almost $6 per. However, the more you order, the price of shipping will actually start to go DOWN. At 7 cases (42 tubes), it dropped to $7.41 for shipping making it $3.12 per tube, and at 20 cases, it was only up to $8.16 for shipping, making bulk purchases very much worth it. At $131.31 for 42 tubes, this was the best deal out there, and only gets better the higher you go. They do not accept PayPal, but do accept all major credit cards.#3) Ace Hardware Outlet - Don't ask me why AceHardware.com doesn't carry it, but AceHardwareOutlet does, but I'm not going to argue. At its respectable price of $3.39 per tube, it's not a bad deal if you're buying in bulk. Unfortunately, for just a single tube to ship, you're looking at $6.39 for shipping. The shipping rates only slowly go up the more you pile on, so if you're doing some shopping for some other hardware, Ace is The Place... For Me... (Plus, they take PayPal!) For individual tubes assuming you can't find anything locally, this is the best price going. At least buy 2 or 3 tubes at a time to make the shipping worth it, though.#4) Hands-On Tools - Another site with fair shipping, and a decent price of $3.66 per tube. Not much to say about this one, except that they seem to be one of the more reputable sites selling the weld for a good price. They work with the BBB and have a good rating, accept PayPal, and give you percentage discounts the more you buy. All around a solid company.#5) Castle Wholesalers - One of my personal favorites (since they are located near me, mostly) selling the JB Weld at $3.47 per tube. However, do keep in mind that you have a $25 minimum order here. Their prices are pretty standard for shipping, so you can add about $1 per tube once you've bought the requisite $25 worth. The more you buy, the cheaper the shipping gets per tube, as well. Only Visa and Mastercard accepted.#6) College Toolbox - While their price isn't the best, it's still a fun site with some decent stuff at fair prices. At $4.11 per tube, it's not necessarily worth the purchase here unless you find enough of their gear to get the "$150 purchase gets free shipping" thing. (And they take PayPal)In closing, if needing just a tube or two, your best bet is always going to be to shop locally, and buy from a hardware store. But once you start getting into the $5 and $6 price range, there are some decent places online to pick it up (if you don't mind the wait). Always take shipping into account, and always avoid Amazon.com and their Affiliate's rip-off schemes. If you see the Amazon logo, run far and fast (or at least close the window). E-Bay is equally a rip-off, only moreso as you're starting at the $9.99 level, and then tacking shipping onto that.For the hobbyist that understands the glory that is JB Weld, drop the $130 and get enough JB Weld to last you for a long, long time. For all others, I would recommend avoiding purchasing it online unless you absolutely can't find it for a fair price in your local stores (I can't stress that enough. Shipping is the debbil.)Hope this helps someone, and if anyone finds a better price, feel free to include it in the comments and I'll add it to the list!

Posted by Javin007 9 years ago


How to bond cross linked acrylic sheets?

I want to join two 1/4" thick acrylic sheets.  All the welding adhesives for acrylic claim to not work for cross linked joins.  Can someone please suggest the proper chemical or any other method to bond the two pieces together. Thanks.

Posted by kabira 3 years ago


Welding!!

So I see tons of instructables for no weld bikes, trailers, and all kinds of stuff. Well, I just got a new flux wirefeed welder. I need something to weld! It has just been sitting there after I stopped practicing to save some wire. I welded the seats down in my car and want a new project that's not too hard. Give me your ideas!

Posted by Yerboogieman 7 years ago


Backpack Welder

Check out this awesome backpack welder; I saw it in a Farm Show magazine.  It would be fun if someone made an Instructable of one of these.

Posted by robbtoberfest 8 years ago


Need help with wiring a KJD17 switch for homemade stick welder!

Hello everybody! So, I finally got around and made a stick welder, and it wa surprisingly easy! Now it's just up to make the box it will live in, cooling and on-off-switches and the like. I have a KJD17-switch which I'd really would like to use, it has automatic safety protection against power outages and restarts, which sounds nice enough, considering that this again is an electric appliane that I made myself, meaning more protection is always good! Now the problem is the safety protection, as I do not know how to wire it! Where am I supposed to connect the A1-pin? To pin 14, maybe? I'm afraid I'll destroy this nice switch by connecting it wrong, so if anyone has a clue, please let me know. The datasheet for the switch can be found here. On the datasheet there is the same shematics as on my switch. Best regards Elmo

Posted by Kaljakaaleppi 7 years ago


robotic arm arc welder

Is it a robotic arm capable of arc welding feasible for a diyselfer ? I spotted some robot arms for cheaper than 200 $ over the web . Vantages for the operator would be no weld fumes breathing , no uv rays and such ..

Posted by gabdab 5 years ago


Welding as a craft subject listed under crafts and also some nice welding projects

Let's add Welding as a craft subject listed under crafts and also get some nice welding projects.

Posted by geezerbeast 2 years ago


"Welding" Plastic

What is the best way of "welding" or joining two pieces of plastic? The type of plastic I'm using is the translucent material used in milk containers.

Posted by BrianKT 10 years ago


Welding Classes?

I really want to learn how to weld but don't know where I can go.  Does anyone know a class or workshop in Kansas City, Missouri were a can learn to weld?

Posted by H20 8 years ago


liquid weld

I patched the bottom of an iron pan we use for camping with liquid weld, is it safe to eat food cooked in the pan?

Posted by thinkingtank 3 years ago


Remove RF welding

I am trying to build a small tent and bag.  i have some nylon fabric that have been RF welded before. Is there any way to remove this welding so that i can reuse the material ?

Posted by tingtong74 5 years ago


How to fasten galvanized pipes?

Hi there, I have a lot of galvanized conduit of various diameters that I found in a dumpster. I would very much like to know how to fasten one pipe to another so I can make stuff with it.Welding: I've read on instructables and elsewhere that you will become quite ill if you weld galvanized materials due to the evolved zinc fumes. Are respirators an option?Lap Joints: I thought of trying to make a lap joint by cutting out matching "half rings" from the pipes, overlaying them, and then bolting them through. I'm stuck as to how to make that cut though. I could do it in wood, it seems like metal would be trickier. Any thoughts?I'm being forced to move the pipe in a week or so; any off-the-cuff ideas would be fantastic, thanks!

Posted by post.haste 10 years ago


art welding

I want to get into art welding and don't have any welding experience. Where can I go to get welding instruction and guidance for small projects. I don't know the difference between a TIG, MIG, or Arc welders. Which one is the best to learn on?Not intrested in jewelry. Thanks

Posted by bouche 11 years ago


welding how-tos?

I want to learn how to weld aluminum and steel. Anyone know of good sources of information and/or starter kits?

Posted by ravelgrane 11 years ago



welding

I was thinking of making a welder that uses a capacitor bank, and does stick welding (STAW). How would I go about doing this? Any other ideas for homemade welders? A small desktop welder?

Posted by LinuxH4x0r 10 years ago


Welding

Hello, I am currently in the process of making a pneumatic air-gun, I have previously made one out of PVC but had major leakage problems.. Ive moved on to metal.. Will high pressures break the welds and fly off and hit me in the face?? What pressures? Can I weld brass to steel?

Posted by alex117 9 years ago


Fabric welding, no sew, hf/rf welding

Howdy folks, I've got a question that I hope someone might be able to help me with.  I'm interesting in creating a way to "weld" fabric together.  Basically taking two pieces of fabric, using heat, pressure and "glue" attach them together.  Think of Nike footwear and there sewless uppers. Anyone out there done anything like this DIY style?  I've got a number of projects that I could create from it. Thanks in advance, TOM

Posted by thmsbender 6 years ago


First time welding (and im 14)

have always been making things from instructables, but i was limited to office warfare type things knex etc. I have always taken interest in what my dad is doing in the garage. From making me bb gun targets to welding brackets on my bmx bike. My dad was really happy when i started to take an interest in welding. I welded for the first time tonight. He was impressed with me. He said that i can already weld better than a lot of people he knows. this was just something i tacked together.

Posted by ajmerc10 7 years ago


Threaded Brass Inserts, 6-32, Sonic Weld, Press or Solder.

Add threads to new projects as well as modify or repair existing products. If the plastic you are using can be melted with a soldering iron you can place the insert on the part you want to add threads to. Then heat the insert with a soldering iron and press in to the part as the insert melts the plastic. Try with and without pilot hole. Excess plastic can be cleaned up with a dremel tool. You can also try soldering the inserts to the surface of metals that can be soldered such as copper and brass. Add these as threaded standoffs by soldering to bare copper on you circuit boards. Just the right color for steam punk projects. This part can be pressed into some materials with the right size pilot hole. Get them here: 50 pieces for $9.00. Free shipping: http://www.ebay.com/itm/50-Pieces-Brass-Threaded-Insert-6-32-Ships-Free-/130947172652?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash;=item1e7d0f492c#ht_96wt_1084   12 pieces for $5.50 http://www.ebay.com/itm/12-Pieces-6-32-Brass-Threaded-Insert-Free-Shipping-/130947489203?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash;=item1e7d141db3#ht_115wt_1084

Posted by luxstar 5 years ago


need help welding

I have a 1970 HT panelvan which i am restoring. I have replaced a floor panel but i cannot get the main undersuport panel to take to the new floor panel i have cleaned thw paint off the area need and clamped it tight. I drilled holes throught the support panel and gave plenty of weld but it did not take in any area why is this happening can anyone help

Posted by wayneavery 10 years ago


How to weld a broken woven wire fence?

I am trying to fix a stretch of woven wire fence that was broken by a car running into it about 3 months ago. The wire itself is completely broken in two. I want to weld the wire back togeather, but the trouble is that I weld with Oxy Mapp gas and my welding wire is the same thickness as the fence wire. I am worried about melting the fence when I am trying to repair it. So what I think I need is some way to ark weld the wire, but I do not have an ark welder. Are there any homemade welders I can make for this purpose, because I do not want to buy something I will never use again?

Posted by Sedgewick17 10 years ago


Arc Welding Advice?

My father-in-law just gave me this 295 amp arc welding rig (he's forbidden to use it anymore--pacemaker.) It's complete with mask, rods, etc. I've never welded before, and have a couple questions:-- Any good books or tutorials to recommend?-- I live in an older home (1930s), which has bus fuses and certainly can't supply 295 amps without burning out (or down.)Should I get a separate service installed for the garage? Is it expensive? I've looked on the power company website, and it's typical superficial information for the average customer...

Posted by gmoon 9 years ago


AC vs DC welding Science.

AC vs DC welding. I'm not contesting whether DC is better. Consensus is "yes"  But what about the physics of _WHY_ it is better? Theory: when a droplet of steel on the electrode is charged opposite of the workpiece, it is drawn toward the workpiece.  BUT in AC, there are moments when the charge drops to zero and reverses. At that time, might the droplets of steel, for just a moment, be electrostatically drawn back toward the electrode? Y,N,M?

Posted by Toga_Dan 2 years ago


Can anyone make an instructable on building a gas welding gas kit?

Oxy acetylene kit with torch and gauges? Is it even possible?

Posted by eric m 9 years ago


Tips on Welding

This is s a general forum for people to post questions and tips they have found over the time they've spent welding My question/tip is this - I recently had to weld two pieces of oddly shaped steel together. Placement and alignment was important for me but the shapes of the steel pieces made clamping them together a bit of a mission. My solution was to position and hold the pieces of steel using prestik (probably the south african equivalent of U.S. bluetack - maybe chewing gum could work) and then the steel pieces didn't move while I tacked them in place. My question is obviously whether this is a questionable practice because of fumes (I didn't notice any) or weakening of the weld from the prestik inclusion (it seems to be holding quite nicely though and the piece is now the switch activator for a press strip feeder. If you can't think of any problems then its a tip

Posted by djmachet 9 years ago


welding cast iron to mild steel

Welding cast iron to mild steel is for the most part done with ornamental iron such as gates and fences. the ornaments are typicaly cast iron such as spearpoints and fit over the top of what ever square tubing size ect you are working with. If you weld say with a mig welder in the normal mannor you rweld will cold roll and ball on you leaving a poor appearance that you will have to spend time grinding to make look good. Fortunatly it is not a matter of strenght or how much penetration ect. It is just ornamentation but must look good. Now take your mig welder with say 035 wire and use pure argon..(less spatter). Turn your welders heat up somewhat past what your normanl setting would be for what ever thickness you are using. Use breif spot welding like techniques overlapping as needed. You will find that this makes a good wash bead with no undercut or cold roll. The argon gas helps to keep down all the extra spatter welding cast iron to mild steel seems to cause. Larger peices such as caps for say 4by4 gate posts or fence posts, i preheat as uniformely as possibly to just under cherry red then weld as described. It welds badly because cast iron is actualy dirty, literaly with particles of dirt in the cheap castings, wich the ornaments are. Not haviong the need to be anealed or nodular for instance. If the welds are not going to show then you dont have to do this. It will still weld, just do not expect the clean perfect welds you are used to.  And NO I do not have PICS AND I dont own a digital camera nor do i know how to use one let alone put them on a computer.

Posted by beserker 6 years ago


Making a better spot welder....

I am in the process of building a proper spot welder from scratch. Proper more in terms of the electrical and electronics part but not so much in looks ;) My problem now is to find useful info on what power levels are required for certain tasks. I realise that welding thin sheet metal won't need as much time and amps as welding a 3mm stainless steel rod - but what is a "good" power level? I watched a bunch of Youtube videos showing various approaches but for many it seems the producer had no clue about the difference between creating a short with burn marks and a weld... Especially when it comes to creating battery packs with a capacitor bank as the main power provider you can clearly see the device burns holes but does not really create a welded spot. On the other hand there are a few videos showing spot welder made from a MOT that seem to produce a proper melted and welded connection. When I used a proper spot welder at work it had timing settings, power levels and even a feature to adjust how the current rises.... Not to mention a gauge that checks the pressure and only activates the welder once the set point is reached... There is a ton of info out there that after a thausand words still tells you nothing you need to know :( So is there anyone here who can shed some light on the actual process of spot welding in easy words for everyone to follow? I am aiming for a max output of around 400A @ 1.5 -2.5V with an adjustable shunt in the transformer core to avoid oversaturating the core. In a later stage I will add power control over the primary side but until then it is only time control, from a few ms to a max of 5sec if the damn controller arrives one day. Big questions: 1. Is a power control really required or is it possible to cater from thin to thick just by using different timing settings? 2. Since a MOT is used for the power supply: Is it better to leave the shunts out to fully avoid saturation by adding an inductor in line with the primary or is it still better to adjust the shunts under load to get the maximum power possible? 3. Aluminium and other materials benefit from using AC but would be good to have a DC output too, if so then what materials really need DC? 4. All I could find is that copper is used for the electrodes, due to resistance and heat transfer - are there other options apart from using copper? 5. Tricky one: I would prefer to use the secondary winding as the new primary to avoid core saturation and to lower the load on the power outlet. Where can I find very thin copper bar material that I can coil up and insulate as I would quite a few more turns to get at least 1.5V out of it? Just don't like the idea of spending days rolling a copper bar thin enough.... For the advanced model at a much later stage: Of course I would like to be able to use a proper power control instead of a motor dimmer or similar. For obvious reasons an inverter microwave jumps to mind. But after checking one I noticed one big problem: there are not really that many windings on the primary of the transformer at all! Same way our modern switchmode power supplies only use a few turns these things do exactly the same. After some quick and dirty initial tests I realised that even a single turn of thick wire already results in over 20V on the secondary. Wasted a lot of wire and time making one coil with 5 turns less and one with 10 turns less but the system would not even start with it. Seems these things need a fixed inductivity on the primary that matches the frequency used, in my case 36kHz. Would love to overcome this problem so I can at least go down to a single turn to get under 5V on the output side as space is non existing on these inverters. Can I cheat? Do I need to change the circuit to match the new primary coil? Am I thinking in the wrong direction altogether here? And added bonus would be to be able to adjust the power from around 15% to 100%, so far the electronics don't allow anything below 45%. Is it possible to drive these inverters in resonance? (Ok, off topic as I would like to use this for a beefy HV supply) Last thoughts: I know people already used Arduinos and Raspberries with displays and all but so far I have not found anything that shows how to do it properly. Seems all that counts is to create connection one way or the other and to call it a spot weld even if it is just a burn hole from discharging a capacitor bank through a needle like electrode.... For obvious reasons I don't want to create just another spot welder that makes a professional pee himself laughing about it. IMHO nothing beats personal experience with something but I don't really like wasting my time by trying what other people alread did a long time ago. So if YOU already built a MOT based spot welder and used for more than a few spots I would love to hear from you! Let me know what type you used, what problems or shortcomings you noticed or where you feel it just does not work out the way you expected it. From simple things like always getting bad sparks or arcing, over how easy or hard it is to get consistand results to whatever really annoys you while using your homemade spot welder. I hope that your feedback here will help me to write an Instructable on building a spot welder that does what you expect it to do, not once or twice, but everytime you use it. Mechanics might vary the same way the electrode style does but the weld should always be a proper weld that won't tear apart ;)

Posted by Downunder35m 9 months ago


diy welding mahine cable size?

Hi guys i wanna make a welder. i checked https://www.instructables.com/id/Making-an-ARC-Welder-Part-1-of-2/ there the king uses 8 awg copper cables for the winding of the transformers.  here (namibia) they seem to have only 6 or 10 sqare mm cables. can i use 1 of those?

Posted by kefflon 1 year ago


Peanut Butter Cups, Welding, R2D2 Lamps

  Peanut Butter Cups Welding R2D2 Lamp Alarm Clocks Tree Speakers Aluminum Can Craft Weight-Sensitive Backpack Floppy Disk Percussion Drain Barrels Paracord Can Koozie Make Your Twin WIFI Projects Create a 3D Layered Drawing Paracord Belt Balloon Tying Jig

Posted by randofo 8 years ago


Welding and Machinist Classes

Hello I am an exhibits designer and builder for a museum. I weld and do some machining every week. I would like to take formal classes here in Philadelphia or the surrounding area but I can not find a single program! One would think that in a major city there would be something but no luck so far. Does anyone know of a school. New Jersey would be ok too. Thank You Montrose

Posted by Montrose 7 years ago


Welded structure for 2 camera

Hello, I am building a sensor base one modified stock camera for agriculture survey,this sensor will be under a drone. I an looking to build the structure that hold this two camera. I know how to weld using Stick and Mig so i was looking to use mild steel plate, and bend it to get more resistance. but i don't know how to calculate the minimum thickness ( weight is really important). On the photo attached the red circle and opposite screw hold and the blue one is a bigger screw hole. Each of the two camera weight 250 grams and they are 10 cm heigh. All the best Vincent

Posted by VincentD48 1 year ago


brazing/welding dilemma

I'm building a cnc machine and I just bought a whole bunch of steel vat a surplus store. I need to braze or weld them together, but I can't braze since the objects too big for my propane tank, it disipates tthe heat to fast. I can't afford an arc welder. What should I do? I don't want to use nuts and bolts because that adds wiggle to the machine and I lose all of my accuracy.

Posted by guyfrom7up 10 years ago


Clubworkshop open in Denver

Clubworkshop recently opened its doors- they have everything from woodworking to welding, CNC mills and rapid prototyping equipment. 16,000 square feet of maker heaven. I know I could spend some serious time there!

Posted by Honus 9 years ago


Worst prank EVER

So I broke a wheel off my lawnmower, no big deal, just weld it back on. How was I supposed to know that a wooden stump would break it? Anyways, since i have a shitty flux core mig welder from Harbor Freight, I decided I'd ask a friend to use their gas mig to fix it. I bring the lawn mower over, bring the welder outside, clamp the wheel bracket back on, and start the weld. All of a sudden, there's a huge ball of fire all over my mask. I immediately stop welding, and jump backwards.. yelling out, while he sits there on the ground laughing. He switched the argon with acetylene, at 10psi. Not cool. It was hilarious, but not cool.

Posted by cvxdes 10 years ago


Your tipe of Workshop.

What is your workshop intended for. Crafts, electronic, carpenters, welding, bike repairs... What is the thing you most like about your workshop, what would you like to have, like a 3D laser cutter... Where would you like it to be located, in the nature, in a house, building... What do you think is the most important tool you have.

Posted by comodore 9 years ago


High Current measurement

I need to measure Current from a welding machine to make a alarm if it goes down below some level for ensuring better quality of welding. The current normally set is of the order of 200A max with around 100V DC.Not sure if i could use some clamp-on meters and pass those values out to Arduino for switching circuit. Shunt resistors may be a better option. But to make a signal conditioner to convert the ma output will be a problem i guess..is there something i can do with Arduino.. any ideas guys....? Thanks in advance Chuppandi

Posted by chuppandi 6 years ago


Welding Transformers in series. How close can they get to one another?

Building the microwave transformer welder. Is there a distance that they need to be from one another? One site said they need to be 5" from each other. Some youtube vid said they can't be aligned in the same direction and has to be 90 degrees turned.

Posted by eric m 9 years ago


RECUMBENTS FROM 2X4 LUMBER

Look on http://mysite.verizon.net/res88kr1/ for plans of a 2X4 recumbent. No welding and no special parts needed.

Posted by bikeboy 11 years ago


Need Help With A Mini Spot Welder

I've been trying to gather information to build a welder for a special application. The use is for welding the commutator tabs and magnet wire that passes over them for small DC motors. While there are specialized and often automated welders made for this purpose, they are both large and very expensive and really intended for industrial users. I have been able to get small bits of information as to how others have done this, but it's been difficult to get the whole project laid out (there is apparently some "secrecy" involved here!?). The materials being welded (soldering isn't a preferable way to make this connection...these motors run hot and very fast) are the brass commutator tabs (approximately .030" thick material about .060" wide formed as a "U") and the copper magnet wire used to wind the poles that then passes over each brass tab...from #23 awg to #28awg. From what I've been able to gather, people have done this on a "homebrew" basis using 6V automotive battery chargers/starters that can deliver around 30 amps or more. I have very little knowledge of electronics and none at all about welding and circuit design, but am looking for information on how I might proceed after sourcing the charger/starter. I'm guessing that the "negative" cable would be adapted to use as a clamp at the commutator and would also double as a heat sink to prevent damaging the commutator and that the "positive" cable would somehow be adapted to hold some sort of fine rod that would touch each com tab to complete the welds. -Maybe a footswitch could or should be used to start/stop the weld? -Is the positive cable simply used to hold a rod for the "spot weld"?, or are there other pieces that need to be added? To my mind, it would seem that simply touching the positive to the commutator tab to make the weld and complete the circuit would simply trip a breaker at the panel or any protection device on the charger(dead short!?). -Any other information or thoughts? Thank you in advance -john

Posted by havlicek 9 years ago


Upcoming Welding, Mechanical Sculpture, Woodturning, Glass Classes etc at The Crucible

Want to expand your repertoire of Instructable skills so you can weld, make fun kinetic sculptures with your creations or re-use old stuff, make jewelry, glass etc? If you're in the SF Bay Area, check out the upcoming classes at The Crucible, a non-profit in West Oakland, CA. It's easy to get there off of 880 or by BART.Some classes have "family packs" where 2 people can get a discount when you take a class together, which could make for an interesting Father's Day or graduation gift. You can see all the classes and start dates on these postings:http://sfbay.craigslist.org/search/cls/eby?query=crucible&neighborhood;=Or browse around on The Crucible site - http://www.thecrucible.orgHave fun!

Posted by susie 10 years ago


Cal Lane's steel lace

The photo of this cut-steel lacework make me want to run out to the shop, grab the torch & some scrap steel, and start carving. Cal Lane cuts shovels into lace, oil drums into tapestry, and I-beams into filigreed sculpture with incredible delicacy. From the New York Times article: "The work is about the contrasts between the industrial and the fanciful, the opaque and the transparent. Ms. Lane described herself as "a person who always has opposites in my head."She started her adult life as a hairdresser (her mother owned a salon in Victoria), but she said she was a tomboy and "welding seemed to fit me better." The mix of feminine and masculine vocations (teasing hair and welding steel), she said, is encapsulated in her work."Check out more of Lane's work here and here. Amazing.

Posted by reno_dakota 10 years ago


TechShop Menlo Park Open House -- Saturday May 31, 2008 10 AM to 5 PM

Jim Newton at TechShop wants to let you and the other people in the SF bay area maker community know that they're having an Open House at TechShop Menlo Park on Saturday, May 31st from 10 AM to 5 PM, and everyone is invited.NEW TOOLS AND EQUIPMENTYou'll be able to check out all the tools, machines and workspace and see how TechShop can help you build all those projects you've always wanted to make. They have a bunch of new tools, including the brand-new 45-watt Epilog Helix laser cutter with 18 x 24 bed and a rotary attachment for etching bottles and cylindrical objects (now they have two of these Epilog Helix 45 Laser Cutters), 4 brand new computers packed full of 2D and 3D design software including SolidWorks (CAD), a plastics vacuum forming station, and a super easy-to-use computer-controlled ShopBot CNC router that can cut out and carve any piece of plywood or solid wood or plastic up to 4 x 8 feet!BRING YOUR PROJECTSPlease feel free to bring your projects to the Open House to show off...completed or not. It will be fun for everyone to see what you're been working on.THE DETAILS o TechShop Open House, Saturday, May 31, 2008, 10 AM to 5 PM o TechShop, 120 Independence Dr, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (Near Marsh Road and 101) o Guided Tours Will Be Given Throughout the Day o BBQ and Pot Luck -- Please Bring Your Favorite Main Dish, Side Dish or Dessert o Tell Your Family and Friends, and Bring Them With You o Kids Are Welcome Too! o Lots of Parking, All Free o No Need to RSVP...Just Come On By!Event details are available on the TechShop Events Page TechShop Events Page.SECURE YOUR TECHSHOP MEMBERSHIP SLOT WHILE YOU STILL CANTechShop 1-month, 6-month, and 1-Year memberships are available. May 31st -- the day of the TechShop Open House -- is the very last day to take advantage of our special membership pricing...membership prices will go up on June 1st. With over 160 memberships sold in just the last 3 weeks, we are quickly approaching our membership cap of 500 members. Buy your membership online right now or at the Open House...save money, and make sure you reserve your membership slot and don't end up on the waiting list!We all look forward to seeing you at the Open House on May 31st! TechShop120 Independence DrMenlo Park, CA 94025(800) 640-1975[mailto:info@techshop.ws info@techshop.ws]http://www.techshop.ws/

Posted by TechShopJim 10 years ago


need welder/mechanic in london UK (go kart)

Hi guys, I am seeking for professional help to build a go kart. Welding and workshop would be needed. This is a project seeking to use biogas to power the engine. The vehicle I seek to build is a standing type of ATV. I've used the word go-kart simply because of the majority of parts I would be using is from go-karts. Please contact me if you are interested, paid work.

Posted by tesselar 5 years ago


People powered woody garden waste shredder

Would someone please make an instructable for a hand or bike powered 'shredder' or 'chipper'  that doesn't involve welding.  Bahi did a great one, but it requires welding, and we don't have that available. The woody stuff that needs making into much smaller pieces are: orach stems, collard and kale stems, summer squash vines, perpetual spinach roots, tomato stems and Florence fennel stalks (they get to be about eight feet tall each year). 

Posted by mole1 7 years ago


Making a dwarf welding helmet out of fiberglass.

Hey everyone, I've been thinking about a new project lately. And for that I need a lot of tips. So here is what, why and how. Introduction: I'm currently making a welding helmet out of an old beer keg as in the instructable of bricobart. When I started with it I though about using the keg as sheet material to make a papercraft mask, probably Dr. Doom or the ABC warrior Hammerstein from the first Judge Dredd movie. I quickly realised it wouldn't provide me the result I like to have, so now I'm just making the 'simple' version from bricobart. But I don't give up that easily. I also want to make something out of fiberglass and epoxy resin for a while, just to have the experience and to try it. So my quest for the perfect helmet/mask continued. I found Fallout helmets, which have tubing on which I could attach a breathing device. But finally I came to this Erebor helmet from the Hobbit. The plan: The plan is to make the Erebor helmet with a hinged visor. I am planning on using several pepakura helmet models and combine them to make the helmet suitable for my welding purpose. The hinged visor and all other mechanics like that I can work out myself. The paper helmet will then be covered with epoxy and fiberglass as can be seen in several other instructables. To make it smooth and for details, I will use car body filler. (I already know EVA foam is the better choice for the helmet, but I don't trust is with the temperature of the welding and I read things about epoxy resins not werking properly on EVA foam.) However, I never used epoxy resin/fiberglass/car body filler or any of these kind of materials. So therefor I need al the help I can get from here. What kind of stuff is suitable for my welding helmet due to high temperature (gradient)? What is the best way to go so all parts will connect properly? Is it wise to start this project?(Please don't answer no, because I will probably won't listen). Painting tips, epoxy tips, general tips etc. Thanks in advance.

Posted by ruudcreates 4 years ago


Kickbike

I'm building a kickbike out of two mountain bikes. The goal is to do it without a welding kit. I'll have pics up soon. cheers, Dick Lawless

Posted by RichardKL 11 years ago


Silhouette from photo

How to make a silhouette from a photo on my iPad  I want a silhouette of our 50 Chevy Pickup to weld on to our rod iron fence thank you

Posted by HowardSue 4 years ago


HEAT SEALERS

Hi guys, gals and robots of course I am having trouble finding out what type of sealer and the required wattage needed to weld high quality annexe matting which is about 3mm thick x 2 - 6mm all up. It is 98% nylon. I need something with about 600mm long jaws and variable heat and probably 6mm weld width? I would like to make my own as well, quite handy with electrics and mechanical stuff, live in Australia with 240v Kind Regards Build Stuff

Posted by Build Stuff 4 years ago


i just joined last night!

Hey eveyone...just wanted to say hi! a friend told me about this sweet site! see ya around, timothy

Posted by timothyadamdesigns 10 years ago