672Views4Replies

Author Options:

I deleted this question from instructables because they removed the ability to view an instuctable in its whole for free Answered

I deleted this question from instructables because they removed the ability to view an instuctable in its whole for free 11-2-09

Discussions

0
None
lemonie

Best Answer 9 years ago

Your fertiliser is most likely providing the nitrogen source which is ending-up as ammonia. Bacteria can produce ammonia, but (other) bacteria can also oxidise ammonia to nitrate. This is what you want to happen, because your plants can be nourished by nitrate.

If the place smells of ammonia there is insufficient oxygen in there, see what happens if you allow more air in.

This is pretty much what AndyGondorf said, but I don't believe you'll need to renew the soil.

Maybe adding fertiliser to the bottom was not such a good idea - less air down there?

L

0
None
Cthulu

9 years ago

Im not really sure, but if you used a non-organic (chemical) fertilizer it may be having a chemical reaction with the container it is in. I know I used to use the cheap plastic seed starter trays, and they tend to break down over time. Also a lesson I have learned, is that cats like to pee in strange places, so if you have a cat, it may have "waterd" you plants :(

0
None
AndyGondorf

9 years ago

Possible suggestions: 1: Anaerobic breakdown of organic matter in the soil. Maybe your greenhouse needs better ventilation? 2: A lack of certain types of bacteria in the soil which convert ammonia to nitrates. Not sure how to sort this I'm afraid without renewing the soil or growing medium.

0
None
Kiteman

9 years ago

The small could be the fertiliser itself. Could you have added too much?