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Antique Fan Answered

Hi, I bought an old Hunter antique fan at a garage sale  that I am trying to make work.

I should mention that I am a 65-year-old female and have never done this sort of thing before.

I have removed the cage and blade.   

Through another source which has stopped helping me, I was able to unlock and de-grease the oil box.

I did rewire the main cord and I see that the fan does work.  Yay!!!!

Now the problems start.  There is a 3-wire cord that comes out of the motor head and  snakes down to inside the base.  This cord is majorly frayed.   It is not like the 2-wire cord I fixed that plugged into the wall outlet.

I need some advice on how to replace the portion of the cord that shows the fray for both esthetic and safety reasons.  It is wired inside the motor and I don't want to remove that attachment.   I have enough wiggle room with the cord to add/replace a portion and snake it down to the base.

I will attach some pictures to try and clarify my ramblings.

Discussions

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Downunder35m

2 years ago

There are two (or three) ways of addressing that cord:
a) As I only see the outer insulation damaged you could cover it with heat shrink tubing or pull a fibreglass sleeve over the cable.
b) You can get a replacement cord for the use on hot household items like waffle maker, ironing board or similar.
They usually use white cotton as the added outer nsulation against heat but black can be found too.
c) Would spoil the anique look a bit but you can just replace it with a nomal 3-core cord that you salvage from an old extension lead or similar.

B and C however will require you to replace the cable.
If you want to stick to the original then you will need to find a black cotton covered cord or use fabric color to make a white one black.
For the "cable ties" you will ned to get waxed thread as used for leather work or hevy duty hand stitching.
If all the above is less important than function and safety then get self sealing silicone tape (emergency repair tape) to wrap around the fried parts after checking that the core wires are still insulated.

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dani eggertDownunder35m

Reply 2 years ago

Thank you so much for responding.

I did go to a site today and bought 36" of round 'antique" cloth covered wire.

Now here is my question and please tell me if I will electrocute my self if I try this. I have a good 5" of good wire that sits under the back base of the fan. It currently is not on but it covers the whole back. Can I cut this wire about 3" from where it is attached and splice in this new cord? it will be under the cover and no one will see the splice. then I would take the new cord and snake it through to the bottom and under the fan? That looks like an easy fix under the fan, but I am worried about the splice up toward the top.

I will attach a couple of pictures

Please respond , thank you

20161017_161410[1].jpg20161017_161429[1].jpg
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Downunder35mdani eggert

Reply 2 years ago

Considering the age I would prefer to replace the old wiring with your new cord as complete as possible.
"Splicing" won't work, if you want to connect the old and new wires properly you need to solder them together and use heatshrink tubing to insulate it.
Sometimes (if the wire insulation is still in good order) you can be lucky and push the outer sleeve of your fabric cord over the old wires.
But this only works for short pieces as the resistance is usually quite high when fabric rubs against fabric.

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dani eggertDownunder35m

Reply 2 years ago

Nuts, I am afraid to undo the wiring at the place it is going into the motor. It is old and looks too complicated. This already is beyond my comfort zone with electricity.

You said I could solder them together? I am willing to try that. Can I get the heatshrink tubing at a Home Depot? All of this will be under the back dome of the fan and no one will see it anyway. Also if I take this 3-cord wire down to under the fan, I see it is connected to 'other parts' with those screw on connectors. Will I still be able to do that? Where can I go to learn how to solder.

thank you Dani

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Downunder35mdani eggert

Reply 2 years ago

Soldering two wires together is not really that hard, you heat the soldering iron, put some solder on the tip and then "wet" the wire with it.
Do this on both wires and then bring them together and re-heat, the solder will flow together.
If you have no loose end to push the heat shrink over it is best to put it in one wire before soldering them together - leave enough space though so the heat won't shrink it premature.
And should be available in any home depot, same for a cheap solderin iron and some solder.
Not sure if you are able to do it yourself, so if you know someone with more experience to help you it would be benefitial.
But I am sure we also have a few Instructables that explain how to solder the easy way.

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dani eggertDownunder35m

Reply 2 years ago

Good news on this. My son said he is pretty adept at soldering so he will help me with this. He has a soldering thing, a heat gun and the heat wrap you mentioned. Hope it all works. Then my big concern will be putting the fan blade and cage back on but this is not electrical so hopefully I can do that.

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Josehf Murchison

2 years ago

You might want to repost this in Answers.

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Josehf Murchisondani eggert

Reply 2 years ago

Go to Answers click on "Ask A Question" and post just like you did here.

To link,

Highlight the address in the browser by clicking on the address with your mouse.

Press Ctrl and C on your keyboard.

Go to where you want to paste the link and click on where you want to paste the Link.

When you see the cursor where you want the link press Ctrl and V on your keyboard and it will paste the link address where the cursor is.

Then press Enter or Return on the keyboard and the text will change color telling you the link is good.

Now when you click on the link with your mouse the page goes there.