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Battery still usable? Answered

So I had this old power pack my cousin gave me in perfect condition but it had been left for a long time uncharged. So I took the battery out and put it on my charger which automatically went into restoration mode and attempted to desulphate the battery which was sulphated. I did many cycles like this which worked and got it to hold a charge quite well but still not where I wanted it at so I took the main cover off and then the little rubber ones inside and topped it up with distilled water. But I forgot to dump out the excess water after I let the battery absorb it and just went ahead and put it on the charger. When I checked on it all the little rubber caps had blown off and it seemed to boiling inside. So should I scrap the battery or try to resurrect it?? I assume it was probably a lost cause from the start but I don't know if I can find a battery like it or not so Id like to save it.    

Discussions

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jbaker22

3 years ago

For every pound the battery weighs it will take that many days of desulfating to fix it.

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seandoguejbaker22

Answer 3 years ago

Maybe , maybe not. It really depends heavily on the amount of salt deposition. If too coated, there's no practical method for going back. Only forward, to a recycling plant.

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camping crazy

3 years ago

Thanks everyone!! I guess I will try to save it

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Jack A Lopez

3 years ago

I think it will be OK. Just put the little rubber caps back on the cells, erm... loosely, in the case they keep popping off, and then do whatever charging rituals you were doing before, and see if you can get the thing to store charge.

I don't think the "boiling" is really boiling, but rather electrolysis of water, making hydrogen at the cathodes. I've seen this before, and I am guessing this is not harmful. Although, at the same time, I have not had super good luck with lead-acid batteries.

The real proof, is if you can get the battery back into a state so it can store charge.

I suggest not giving up just because the battery emitted some gas.

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Downunder35m

3 years ago

Too much water while still having a constant charge / discharge cycle is no real problem, as you noticed the water will turn to gas.

But if you want to get the battery back to power give this old school trick a go:
For a car sized battery add 5ml of Phosphoric acid to every chamber, truck sized batteries can take 10ml or slightly more.

Now do around 5 charge / discharge cycles making sure not to discharge with a too fast rate or too low.

After that the inside of your battery should look much better and the thing should hold a charge again.

Keep in mind the lead over time can an will disappear to lead oxide and other things that are not useful.

Once you have missing bits on the plates or a layer of scum on the bottom it is time for a new battery as you don't want the battery to create an internal short.